Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Home partition (disk) can be changed without reinstall Linux?
#11
Duck_Luck I started with Linux full time some 2 years ago, I think it was Mint 17.1 maybe 17,  gksu was in there then and still being new to Linux then (Now too) I did not know about it until I seen Joe Collins use it in one of his video's.
I gave it a try a few times and just used the sudo from the terminal anyway.
Just never caught on to it I guess....  Undecided

Quote:we will all consider the gksu package as a package from back in the day.

Lol, At 65 it is all back in the day....  Smile

Quote:the gvfs has bulletin support for admin://paths
Sooo, what is "gvfs" ?

LLAP
**********************************************************
Taglines of the Day:
Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.  Huh 

Everybody remember where we parked. - Kirk

To Boldly Go Where No BBS Has Gone Before. USS Stargazer BBS, Sheridan In.
Reply
#12
(08-08-2019, 02:22 PM)bescott9944 Wrote: Duck_Luck I started with Linux full time some 2 years ago, I think it was Mint 17.1 maybe 17,  gksu was in there then and still being new to Linux then (Now too) I did not know about it until I seen Joe Collins use it in one of his video's.
I gave it a try a few times and just used the sudo from the terminal anyway.
Just never caught on to it I guess....  Undecided

Quote:the gvfs has bulletin support for admin://paths
Sooo, what is "gvfs" ?

LLAP



gvfs

Acronyms can be confusing for a new user.  Knowing this forum has a large new user audience I should not use the gvfs acronym, but I am referring to the gnome virtual file system.  As one example many distros utilize gvfs features to implement the auto mounting or unmounting of removable media. 

gksudo

When sudo runs a program with privileges (running as root), the program still uses the original user home directory.  Consequently, when the software writes its configuration files, it creates files in your home directory with root ownership. You end up with files the original user cannot edit or delete.  Software running as the original user will not be able to modify it either and leading to even more problems.  Furthermore, a non-privileged user level home backup might produce permission errors.  Using the gksu package prevents this situation.  For a terminal user interface use the gksu command, and for a graphical user interface use the gksudo. Without the gksu package some possible work arounds are as follows:


$ admin:///etc/fstab # or

$ pkexec xed /etc/fstab # or

$ sudo -i xed /etc/fstab

The last example can be less secure with all root access given to the application, however it will use the root home directory preventing the previously mentioned scenario.





Reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GVfs
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fil...ctionality
https://askubuntu.com/questions/524667/l...ion-denied
Idea  Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.

Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)