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Just Getting Started
#11
(07-14-2019, 09:47 AM)Tuxinho Wrote: About the disk space, why not 64 GB? it would be like 10% of your old machine HDD. It would be a nice training for partitioning. If this is something you want to try Smile

most important stuff don't be afraid to play the mad scientist with your VM, they are just virtual, you can clone them, try something, break it, use the back up and try something else over and over again.

Nice, I like the Mad Scientist comment... Egor, bring me another VM Drive! HahAhAhA!

Quote:It would be a nice training for partitioning. If this is something you want to try [Image: smile.png]

That is the best part of Virtual Machines, If you Boink the VM to the point it will not boot, Just reinstall and play some more....  Wink
No harm done it is virtual.... Lol
You might say; "No hard drives were harmed in the making of this VM"...  Big Grin

LLAP
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#12
<<"No hard drives were harmed in the making of this VM".>>
lol this is true.
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#13
Thanks for all the helpful replies . A quick update .

After much deliberation and being completely honest with myself , I decided to hold off with virtual box for the time being . As I stated above , I'm not terribly computer savvy and I didn't want to screw with my newer PC just yet . One of my first inclinations was to buy a used PC and install Mint on it . That way I'm starting with a clean hard drive and I'm not in danger of losing any valuable information .

Just bought a used PC on ebay with a Intel Quad Core and 8 MB Ram . It also has Ubuntu 18.04 installed on it . I know even less about Ubuntu than I do Mint and sorry if this is on the wrong forum , but this is where I started the thread . With this used PC , I can always switch over to Mint if I need to , but I was wondering if I could get any opinions on which is more difficult to learn for a beginner and what the main differences are between Ubuntu and Mint .

As always , thanks for any replies .
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#14
(07-18-2019, 06:02 PM)ihavenoidea Wrote: With this used PC , I can always switch over to Mint if I need to , but I was wondering if I could get any opinions on which is more difficult to learn for a beginner and what the main differences are between Ubuntu and Mint .

As always , thanks for any replies .

All right. First of all Ubuntu 18.04 comes shipped with the GNOME Desktop. The GNOME desktop is not as familiar to a new user as Cinnamon, the most common desktop Mint ships with. Canonical, the company that developed Ubuntu, has done a lot of work to make it better than it is on other distros, but it still may take some relearning.

Ubuntu is more bare bones than linux mint. You have Rythembox, a music player, video viewer, text editor, Firefox, file manager (which isn't really as good as the one Linux Mint comes with), and the and the Software Center. There is a couple other things, like the terminal, but that is about it. This can be a problem because, for example, there are some settings, like fonts, that you need to install the GNOME tweak tool for.
Just a teen who LOVES working with computers
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#15
Thank You . Being a windows user since forever , I thought there would be more steep learning curve with Ubuntu .

I'l probably install Mint 19.1 on this used PC . Like I said , it has an Intel Quad Core Processor and 8GB RAM .

If I go with Mint 19.1 , would Cinnamon , MATE or XFCE be most appropriate considering the resources on the PC . Or should I consider something even lighter ? I do not want to partition the hard drive if I don't have to .
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#16
Quote:After much deliberation and being completely honest with myself , I decided to hold off with virtual box for the time being . As I stated above , I'm not terribly computer savvy and I didn't want to screw with my newer PC just yet . 

well, this was not necessary. The all point of virtual box and virtaul machines, is that your host and guest system are not mixed up. See the VM's has video games: every thing you'll do on them is in a "save game" and won't harm your host machine.

But now that you have this machine, you can install all different sorts of distros, try them, wipe it again, and make your own opinion about all of them. At the end of the day the goal gonna be the same: learning through experience. 

I will not repeat what jeremiah just said, but i agree with all of it. Mint is a distro made to be newbie friendly and to people who just want a reliable and working system out of the box. Ubuntu it is not as much working out of the box and newbies friendly as mint.

I might be wrong, but the way i see it, the ubuntu main desktop is more for people who come from the mac world, they will feel at home with the dock system, with the way searching works and such. People who are long time windows user, will feel more confortable with some cinamon or xfce descktop.
But where you comming from (os speaking) don't keep you from learning newx stuff is this is something you want.

(07-19-2019, 04:47 PM)ihavenoidea Wrote: Thank You . Being a windows user since forever , I thought there would be more steep learning curve with Ubuntu .

I'l probably install Mint 19.1 on this used PC . Like I said , it has an Intel Quad Core Processor and 8GB RAM .

If I go with Mint 19.1 , would Cinnamon , MATE or XFCE be most appropriate considering the resources on the PC . Or should I consider something even lighter ?  I do not want to partition the hard drive if I don't have to .

Any of this three will be an experience. Because at the end of the day if cinnamon, mate or xfce are better for you, it is all just a mater of personal preferences. The only way for ou to know is by trying and make your own opinion about them. As i said befor now that you have this experiment machine, you can try them all.
Distro hopping, this means being a distro nomad, is something we all did in our early linux days. Some still doing it years after using linux. And this is fine if they like doing it. But my point is you can distro hope, and desktop hope with this machine you just got and see what you like, dislike about them and pick up one distro/desktop you like.

With this RAM and this CPU i guess you'll gonna be find with default partitioning (the automatic one)
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#17
Thanx . I still may try using virtual box but felt more comfortable using Linux on a used machine first . Just my own quirk .

As long as I have 8 GB memory and the quad core processor on this used PC , your saying Cinnamon should run fine on it ?

Excellent . I'll be back with more questions after the PC arrives and I've had a chance to use it a bit .
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#18
Dude I have linux mint cinnamon running on a machine with 2 gb of ram and a single core processor. Except for it being slow, it works just fine.
Just a teen who LOVES working with computers
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#19
Good to know . Thanks .

Did you partition the hard drive when installing ?

Is that Mint 19.1 or something older ?
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#20
I used the guided partition option in the installer to wipe the hard drive.

And yes, this is Mint 19.1 Cinnamon. You shouldn't have to do anything different from just a normal install.
Just a teen who LOVES working with computers
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