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Anti-virus program needed?
#11
(06-30-2019, 12:05 PM)Expresso Wrote: I especially like the section on reducing harmful radiation emanating from most laptops ,  my laptop now uses about 1/5th of the transmit power to talk to the router, down from 15 dbm to 1,   (which isn't 1/15th of the power)  my (independant) radiation gauge clocked the revised power setting at approx 1/5 of the previous  "normal electrosmog level"..

Even if you believe in small amounds of low power and
low frequency EM radiation being harmfull, that is not
worth it. Every charged particle emits EM radiation when
accelerating. Literally even the straight power cables in
your wall are happily emitting EMR all day long. Especially
devices like electric stoves, the motors in washing machines
or vacuum cleaners or any slightly larger screen are good
emitters.

Despite, going outside on a sunny day will blast you with
considerably more EM radiation, which is considerably more
powerfull and considerably more dangerous.

And let's not forget those fancy MRI scanners in some hospitals.

The emissions of a laptops wireless card are basically ignorable.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#12
(07-01-2019, 01:57 AM)leon.p Wrote:
(06-30-2019, 12:05 PM)Expresso Wrote: I especially like the section on reducing harmful radiation emanating from most laptops ,  my laptop now uses about 1/5th of the transmit power to talk to the router, down from 15 dbm to 1,   (which isn't 1/15th of the power)  my (independant) radiation gauge clocked the revised power setting at approx 1/5 of the previous  "normal electrosmog level"..

Even if you believe in small amounds of low power and
low frequency EM radiation being harmfull, that is not
worth it. Every charged particle emits EM radiation when
accelerating. Literally even the straight power cables in
your wall are happily emitting EMR all day long. Especially
devices like electric stoves, the motors in washing machines
or vacuum cleaners or any slightly larger screen are good
emitters.

Despite, going outside on a sunny day will blast you with
considerably more EM radiation, which is considerably more
powerfull and considerably more dangerous.

And let's not forget those fancy MRI scanners in some hospitals.

The emissions of a laptops wireless card are basically ignorable.

I disagree, having researched the subject it becomes apparent that the electo magnetic fields generated by electrical appliances play havoc with the human bio fields. If you look on the back of an old keyboard (around 2000 or earlier) there is a warning sticker which states that there is a potential health issue involved. Nowdays that sticker isn't there, but what we do see is a large number of keyboard operaters suffering from rsi. Now think back to the old mechanical typewriter, the keys on them really took some pushing  yet there wasn't a problem with r.s.i. .   Also there is the microwave signal which can cause all sorts of health issues (and the effect is cumulative). Youtube has plenty of videos on harmful wi-fi fields if you dare to look.
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#13
(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: I disagree, having researched the subject [...]

I study physics. Just sayin'.


(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: If you look on the back of an old keyboard (around 2000 or earlier) there is a warning sticker which states that there is a potential health issue involved. Nowdays that sticker isn't there, but what we do see is a large number of keyboard operaters suffering from rsi.

RSI, carpal tunnel and similar are things you get not from
radiation, but because the way you have to position and move
your hands when interacting with a keyboard or a mouse is
unnatural.


(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: Now think back to the old mechanical typewriter, the keys on them really took some pushing  yet there wasn't a problem with r.s.i.

Keyboards of mechanical typewriters are shaped differently,
each row is on a different height. These keyboards did not
encourage laying your arms down on your desk like modern
flat keyboards do. Typewriter keyboards simply forced the
typist to hold their arms, wrists and fingers in a healthier
position.


(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: Also there is the microwave signal which can cause all sorts of health issues

Let's assume you mean electromagnetic radiation, since there
is no such thing as "the microwave signal".

EMR with wavelengths around what one would call microwaves is
dangerous if they are high-power. One example of this is a
microwave oven. But now look inside a microwave oven: You will
find that thing has bloody huge transformer, so strong you
could use it to build a DIY welding machine. Now look at your
laptop: That thing comes no where near to what a microwave oven
can output.


(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: Youtube has plenty of videos on harmful wi-fi fields if you dare to look.

I personally prefer scientific studies over youtube videos,
because watching youtube videos is not research, period.

If you want to be afraid of electro magnetic radiation, then
at least choose something with a shorter wavelength, like
UV-Light or X-Rays, because that is actually dangerous.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#14
(07-01-2019, 10:43 AM)leon.p Wrote:
(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: I disagree, having researched the subject [...]

I study physics. Just sayin'.


(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: If you look on the back of an old keyboard (around 2000 or earlier) there is a warning sticker which states that there is a potential health issue involved. Nowdays that sticker isn't there, but what we do see is a large number of keyboard operaters suffering from rsi.

RSI, carpal tunnel and similar are things you get not from
radiation, but because the way you have to position and move
your hands when interacting with a keyboard or a mouse is
unnatural.

The electrical field emanating from your keyboard interrupts the flow of electricity flowing through your nervous system, causing potential health problems as stated by the manufacturer on the back of the first decade of keyboards, this warning isn't given anymore presumably because of potential litigation issues.  Don't say that you haven't been warned when you come down with carpal tunnel, or stiff shoulders/neck. RSI was virtually non existent before electric typewriters were introduced to the mainstream workforce.  My electro-smog meter placed onto any fired up keyboard shows e-field levels to be in the accepted danger zone. Just 1/2 inch above the keyboard is just into the accepted safe zone.  Using the old fashioned mechanical typrewriters is not natural either, but then why the explosion of RSI when their use was discontinued....


(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: Now think back to the old mechanical typewriter, the keys on them really took some pushing  yet there wasn't a problem with r.s.i.

Keyboards of mechanical typewriters are shaped differently,
each row is on a different height. These keyboards did not
encourage laying your arms down on your desk like modern
flat keyboards do. Typewriter keyboards simply forced the
typist to hold their arms, wrists and fingers in a healthier
position.

You can keep your keyboard shape theory if you wish! It isn't up to me to do your homework.

(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: Also there is the microwave signal which can cause all sorts of health issues

Let's assume you mean electromagnetic radiation, since there
is no such thing as "the microwave signal".

EMR with wavelengths around what one would call microwaves is
dangerous if they are high-power. One example of this is a
microwave oven. But now look inside a microwave oven: You will
find that thing has bloody huge transformer, so strong you
could use it to build a DIY welding machine. Now look at your
laptop: That thing comes no where near to what a microwave oven
can output.

The wifi signal IS a microwave signal, here's a link to a knowledgeable physicist if you would like to learn some more about wifi- https://youtu.be/RrDNanZWeqE  There are about a dozen video's by Barrie if you want more info.
(07-01-2019, 04:32 AM)Expresso Wrote: Youtube has plenty of videos on harmful wi-fi fields if you dare to look.

I personally prefer scientific studies over youtube videos,
because watching youtube videos is not research, period.

If you want to be afraid of electro magnetic radiation, then
at least choose something with a shorter wavelength, like
UV-Light or X-Rays, because that is actually dangerous.

UV light isn't dangerous in the correct dose (sunlight) for an appropriate length of time (before you get sunburnt), your body develops a sun tan for the purpose of regulating uv/microwave/xray exposure. It isn't natural radiation levels that are of concern, it's the juiced up waves produced by un-natural sources that should concern you. I'm not here to argue about radiation, I'm after Linux tweaks, so you will have to do your own research, I've going tweak hunting!
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#15
(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: The electrical field emanating from your keyboard interrupts the flow of electricity flowing through your nervous system, causing potential health problems as stated by the manufacturer on the back of the first decade of keyboards, this warning isn't given anymore presumably because of potential litigation issues. 

You mean warning labels like this one and countless similar ones I found online?

[Image: health1_medium.jpg]

There is literally no mentioning of any kind of radiation,
waves, or fields causing RSI. Instead it actually says
what I was saying: You get it when you constantly have your
arms in a bad position.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: Don't say that you haven't been warned when you come down with carpal tunnel, or stiff shoulders/neck.

Oh, I will mostlikely get all that. But it is not caused by
the emlectromegnetic radiation from a keyboard. Even if EMR
could cause it, the currents inside a keyboard are quite small.
The rest of the laptop does not produce any amounts which are
noteworthy in a biological context either.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: RSI was virtually non existent before electric typewriters were introduced to the mainstream workforce.

I asked my mother who has worked with both mechanical and electrical
typewriters, teletypes as well as old and modern computers. According
to her, all of them can cause pain in your wrist and arms.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: My electro-smog meter placed onto any fired up keyboard shows e-field levels to be in the accepted danger zone. Just 1/2 inch above the keyboard is just into the accepted safe zone. 

Cool. But do you actually know what the thing is meassuring? Do you
know who designed the scale that tells you what is safe and what not?

I can hold all kinds of cool probes to my laptop, like Hall-Effect-Sensors
or literally even a simple wire loop connected to a multimeter and get
all kinds of readings. Of course, close to my laptop some readins will be
different, but that does not even remotely imply that anything is dangerous
or harmfull.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: It isn't up to me to do your homework.

True, I definitely would not want you to work on my physics homework.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: The wifi signal IS a microwave signal,

It is electromagnetic waves with a frequency between 300 MHz and 300 GHz.
These waves are called microwaves. However that has nothing to do with
"signal". The signal part of WiFi is unrelated to the wave part and fits
more into computer science than into physics.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: here's a link to a knowledgeable physicist if you would like to learn some more about wifi- https://youtu.be/RrDNanZWeqE  There are about a dozen video's by Barrie if you want more info.

Everyone can upload a video to youtube. Youtube does not care whether the
contents are correct or wrong.

(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: UV light isn't dangerous in the correct dose (sunlight) for an appropriate length of time (before you get sunburnt), your body develops a sun tan for the purpose of regulating uv/microwave/xray exposure.

UV is more dangerous than microwaves, simply because it can be carcinogenic
and cause harm at comparatively low energy levels.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: It isn't natural radiation levels that are of concern, it's the juiced up waves produced by un-natural sources that should concern you.

Obviously microwaves can be dangerous, you definitely would not want to be
close to an unshielded microwave oven. But it needs considerable amounts of
energy to be dangerous. A laptop simply does not have this ammount of energy
stored. And even if you route that ammount of energy into a WiFi chip, it
would burn out before it can produce anything dangerous.

Despite, natural levels of electromagnetic radiation are not as low as you
might think. The earths magnetical field is natural and generated the same
way as other electromegnetic fields: By charged particles (the molten iron
in the core) accellerating. That field literally protects the earth from
sunwinds.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: I'm not here to argue about radiation, I'm after Linux tweaks, so you will have to do your own research, I've going tweak hunting!

Fair enough. But if you write something in a comment, expect it to be answered.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#16
(07-01-2019, 05:46 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: The electrical field emanating from your keyboard interrupts the flow of electricity flowing through your nervous system, causing potential health problems as stated by the manufacturer on the back of the first decade of keyboards, this warning isn't given anymore presumably because of potential litigation issues. 

You mean warning labels like this one and countless similar ones I found online?

[Image: health1_medium.jpg]

There is literally no mentioning of any kind of radiation,
waves, or fields causing RSI. Instead it actually says
what I was saying: You get it when you constantly have your
arms in a bad position.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: Don't say that you haven't been warned when you come down with carpal tunnel, or stiff shoulders/neck.

Oh, I will mostlikely get all that. But it is not caused by
the emlectromegnetic radiation from a keyboard. Even if EMR
could cause it, the currents inside a keyboard are quite small.
The rest of the laptop does not produce any amounts which are
noteworthy in a biological context either.

My electrosmog meter is quite accurate, I'll believe it anyday over your opinion.
(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: RSI was virtually non existent before electric typewriters were introduced to the mainstream workforce.

I asked my mother who has worked with both mechanical and electrical
typewriters, teletypes as well as old and modern computers. According
to her, all of them can cause pain in your wrist and arms.

One persons experience doesn't make a theory. RSI was virtually non existent before electronic typewriters came onto the scene, obviously we have to form our own opinions on why the surge in RSI injuries occurred.
(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: My electro-smog meter placed onto any fired up keyboard shows e-field levels to be in the accepted danger zone. Just 1/2 inch above the keyboard is just into the accepted safe zone. 

Cool. But do you actually know what the thing is meassuring? Do you
know who designed the scale that tells you what is safe and what not?

I can hold all kinds of cool probes to my laptop, like Hall-Effect-Sensors
or literally even a simple wire loop connected to a multimeter and get
all kinds of readings. Of course, close to my laptop some readins will be
different, but that does not even remotely imply that anything is dangerous
or harmfull.

Yes, and yes!
The designated "safe" limit varies quite a bit,  choosing one is up to the individual.

(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: It isn't up to me to do your homework.

True, I definitely would not want you to work on my physics homework.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: The wifi signal IS a microwave signal,

It is electromagnetic waves with a frequency between 300 MHz and 300 GHz.
These waves are called microwaves. However that has nothing to do with
"signal". The signal part of WiFi is unrelated to the wave part and fits
more into computer science than into physics.

The word "signal" was used as a generic term, you knew what I meant, but it seems that you just want to argue, I don't want to waste my time answering you, I have more interesting things to do.
(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: here's a link to a knowledgeable physicist if you would like to learn some more about wifi- https://youtu.be/RrDNanZWeqE  There are about a dozen video's by Barrie if you want more info.

Everyone can upload a video to youtube. Youtube does not care whether the
contents are correct or wrong.

Check the credentials of Barrie Trower .

(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: UV light isn't dangerous in the correct dose (sunlight) for an appropriate length of time (before you get sunburnt), your body develops a sun tan for the purpose of regulating uv/microwave/xray exposure.

UV is more dangerous than microwaves, simply because it can be carcinogenic
and cause harm at comparatively low energy levels.

Microwaves are carcinogenic too, at very low energy levels.
(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: It isn't natural radiation levels that are of concern, it's the juiced up waves produced by un-natural sources that should concern you.

Obviously microwaves can be dangerous, you definitely would not want to be
close to an unshielded microwave oven. But it needs considerable amounts of
energy to be dangerous. A laptop simply does not have this ammount of energy
stored. And even if you route that ammount of energy into a WiFi chip, it
would burn out before it can produce anything dangerous.

Despite, natural levels of electromagnetic radiation are not as low as you
might think. The earths magnetical field is natural and generated the same
way as other electromegnetic fields: By charged particles (the molten iron
in the core) accellerating. That field literally protects the earth from
sunwinds.


(07-01-2019, 11:40 AM)Expresso Wrote: I'm not here to argue about radiation, I'm after Linux tweaks, so you will have to do your own research, I've going tweak hunting!

Fair enough. But if you write something in a comment, expect it to be answered.

I'm not going to waste my time arguing with you about safe/unsafe levels, it comes down to who's scale you believe to be accurate.  Once again, I'm off to learn some more Linux tricks!
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#17
(07-02-2019, 05:01 AM)Expresso Wrote: My electrosmog meter is quite accurate, I'll believe it anyday over your opinion.

And I will believe science over a snake oil device any day.


(07-02-2019, 05:01 AM)Expresso Wrote: One persons experience doesn't make a theory.

She talked not just about herself but also all of her coworkers


(07-02-2019, 05:01 AM)Expresso Wrote: The word "signal" was used as a generic term, you knew what I meant, but it seems that you just want to argue, I don't want to waste my time answering you, I have more interesting things to do.

Nope, I don't just want to argue (what a neat way to shut down
anyone who disagrees with you). But if you want to use sciency
words in a conversation, at least use them somewhat correctly.


(07-02-2019, 05:01 AM)Expresso Wrote: Check the credentials of Barrie Trower .

When I punch his name into DuckDuckGo, the first article that
appears says the following:

Quote:Dr.Barrie Trower is a pseudoscientist who allegedly trained in the Government Microwave Warfare Establishment.
[...]
So far, he hasn't given any concrete evidence to support his apparent training and work.
[...]
He claims that WiFi uses "the same frequencies and powers as microwave stealth warfare weapons", which doesn't sound so scary if you know the properties of microwaves.

And this is what another one says:

Quote:His sensational assertion that Wi-Fi could lead to ovary damage in young girls is a total fabrication. The claim by Trower that Wi-Fi can cause DNA damage is based on a study that was later withdrawn because of scientific fraud. No properly conducted scientific studies have ever demonstrated DNA damage or any other serious effect from microwaves within existing safety standards. Virtually all of the public health authorities of the industrialized world including the World Health Organization, and Health Canada have reviewed the scientific literature and concluded that there is no credible evidence that Wi-Fi, cell phones, etc. cause health effects.

I have searched for about 40 minutes and there are no credible sources
that backup his claims about microwaves or even that he worked in a
government facility or even that he knows anything about physics at all.


(07-02-2019, 05:01 AM)Expresso Wrote: Once again, I'm off to learn some more Linux tricks!

Fair enough.

I just hope you don't waste any money on this obvious fraud.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#18
Don't go too far, you might fall off the edge of the world.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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