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LINUX NAMES ARE STUPID!
#1
I don’t know just why but the whole “Lets call GNOME ‘Gha-Nome’” thing is really getting under my skin. I’m so peeved by it now that I’m going around to other Linux YouTubers and posting nasty comments about it on their videos. I think we should boycott anyone who actually posts a video in which they repeatedly call it “Gha-Nome” just so they can sound hip. We called it ‘Nome, like the city in Alaska, like the little garden statue, for years in our ignorance and to change it now is just stupid. Bad marketing to push something like this. Really, really stupid. Next thing you know, they will be trying to get people to call it “Gee-Nome.”

At least we don’t have to deal with all the MENSA rejects who used to call Linux “Line-UX” anymore. Linus Torvalds set them straight years ago. Of course, now that he’s been successfully de-balled by the Linux Foundation’s PC police, he might not care these days. Who knows?

There are still plenty of other stupid names to have fun with, though:

GNOME 2 was forked into the MATE desktop. That’s another really stupid name. Yes, I call it “mah-tay” in videos but only because that’s what Martin Wimpress, the head developer of Ubuntu MATE, calls it. What they should have done from the beginning is ship the OS with a “é” instead of a regular “e” in the mane. Too late now. So, I end up having to explain myself every time I do a video. It’s just plain stupid. I say we all simply start calling it “mate” as in your buddy, your friend, your pal… I wonder if anyone will jump up in the comments to correct us?

We’re not done. More stupidity. The name “Manjaro” comes from the name of the African mountain called Kilimanjaro. The developers stated that clearly from the start. Still, some knuckleheads actually thought it should be pronounced in a mock Spanish style as “Man-Horo.” I had some dude say that in the comments of the latest Manjaro review video… Stupid!

What about OpenSUSE? Is it Open “Soos,” “Susie” ot “Soos-ah?” The world may never know…

Thank goodness for KDE… No, I’m not saying it’s a great project or anything, just that the name isn’t stupid. We can all agree on how to pronounce letters --- “Kay – DE – EE.” Not stupid at all! Now, what would be stupid is if the developers of KDE suddenly jumped up and tried to get us all to say “Kha-Dee” instead. That would be sort of like calling GNOME “Gha-Nome!” Stupid.
-- Your Fearless Leader!

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#2
Then there is the fuss over how to pronounce .gif files. Hard G or soft G. Despite the developer of the file type pronouncing it with a soft G, people still argue it should ba a hard G.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#3
(06-10-2019, 10:31 AM)EzeeLinux Wrote: What about OpenSUSE? Is it Open “Soos,” “Susie” ot “Soos-ah?” The world may never know…

SUSE is a german company, so I'd say the correct way to pronounce it
would be how it is pronounced in german. That would be kinda like
"Soo-Seh", were the "eh" sound like the "a" in "about".

However it is still weird, even in german. Suse is actually a german
first name. Having it all in capitcal letters would imply it is an
acronym, but apparantly it is not...

(06-10-2019, 10:31 AM)EzeeLinux Wrote: Thank goodness for KDE… No, I’m not saying it’s a great project or anything, just that the name isn’t stupid.

The name is good, true. But in 2009 they decided for some odd reason
that KDE should not longer be the name of the desktop, but the overall
project as well as the group. Officially the desktop is called Plasma.
Obviously everyone still calls it KDE, because the name change was
definitely not really a good idea (although Plasma is not a bad name in
my opinion) but this can lead to some cofusion when trying to read their
documentation, mailing lists or communicate with their devs.



I feel like overall only the larger projects have naming problems. Usually
desktop environments and distributions suffer from this. Smaller projects
often have quite reasonable names: I particularly like "upstart" for canonicals
(sadly) failed attempt at creating an init, "runit" for a process hypervisor,
"redshift" for the screen-red-turning-thing, "rhythmbox" for a music player
and a few others.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#4
This is mainly a joke but I do appreciate your feedback on the subject. Smile
-- Your Fearless Leader!

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#5
IMO I don't care what the name is as long as the project works.  I think it is Gee-Nome. ;-)

This all reminds me of the Cyrix processors.  People said was it sigh-rex or sear-rex.  There was an interview with the CEO and he said we don't care what you call us so long as you buy our CPUs.  Best answer ever for that kind of thing.

I used Cyrix (686) processors for some system builds.  They got a bad wrap for overheating but that was because people didn't pair them with a good cooler.  I never had them overheat in any system builds for clients, family, or myself back in the day.  However I didn't pick junk coolers or use poorly vented cases.

If you care about such things here is a link to WikiPedia about them: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrix
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#6
For some reason I just found this thread now and made me really think.
The real problem is in the latin alphabet and the English language, as in English, it's quite usual that the same letter or letter combination can represent different sounds depending on what the origin of the word is. This of course gets even more complicated when words from other languages come by.
Have you ever thought about the Korean car brand Hyundai? The way you Americans say it is so weird that no Korean would know what you're talking about. In my native Hungary it is pronounced in an other weird way, but that has also have nothing with the original Korean pronunciation, which is perfectly described by the Hangul letters, but get totally lost when romanized.

The criticism for Guh-nome is totally valid though, but in some circles I guess it became a running joke as it should be, I really like how we even have a "Linux GNews" podcast Big Grin
I am working on an Arch installation in a VM that will be moved to an USB stick.
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#7
(06-10-2019, 02:52 PM)EzeeLinux Wrote: This is mainly a joke but I do appreciate your feedback on the subject. Smile

You may have intended your post to be a joke but the issue itself is very real.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#8
So as a joke you can juste enter their game. Just say gnome like an Italian would read it (like the gn in lasagne) just say gif the way a dutch or spanish would read it: like Rif. Just say kid for KDE. SUSE just say it sooz.
They need to burn? just give them wood! Tongue


It is all a joke, except i really pronounce GIF "Rif" just to avoid this soft g vs hard g fight.
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#9
Not just Linux names. So many people have different ways of pronouncing various brands - and no matter how you say it, there will be someone who'll correct you... nine times out of ten they'll do so in a demeaning manner.

Reminds me of a poem I read:

Things must be tough
On Vincent Van Guff

When those in the know
Call him Vincent Van Go

For, unless I'm way off,
It's Vincent Van Goff.


And the thing I love about that poem is, according to my Dutch-speaking friends from the Nederlands, it's actually pronounced more like "Fon Hoch" (with the "ch" being like the gutteral Germanic "ch" as in "doch" or like the Scots "ch" in "Loch") - so the poem managed to get it wrong three times...
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