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Installing programs on Mint
#1
Hello,
I do not understand how to install a program from the terminal.
I understand I have to write "apt-get install and program name" but it's "mechanical" not "organic".
You can help me understand why and how ... and how to install the required packages go with that program.
And how do I install a local server ... I looked at youtube but I do not understand why they do what they do and most of them are for Ubuntu, and I use Mint.
I use the local server for, php, html, css, js
Please explain, because I am new to these programs.
P.S. I installed only Apache2
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#2
(06-09-2019, 06:06 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote: Hello,

Hi!

(06-09-2019, 06:06 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote: I understand I have to write "apt-get install and program name" but it's "mechanical" not "organic".

What do you mean with that? What is "mechanical" instead
of "organic" and what does that have to do with installing
software?

The correct way to install software using the terminal is
like this (using gimp as an example of a program to install):

Code:
sudo apt install gimp


(06-09-2019, 06:06 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote: And how do I install a local server ...
[...]
P.S. I installed only Apache2

You apparently already have installed a server.


(06-09-2019, 06:06 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote: I looked at youtube but I do not understand why they do

Youtube videos are not really a good source for technical
how-tos. Try an article: Text is often better for instructions
than video.

I searched on DuckDuckGo for "Linux Mint LAMP stack
installation for webdev" and I immediatly found this.


(06-09-2019, 06:06 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote: what they do and most of them are for Ubuntu, and I use Mint.

A lot of that will work on mint to.


(06-09-2019, 06:06 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote: I use the local server for, php, html, css, js
Please explain, because I am new to these programs.

So I assume you want to learn web development. You
do not need a full LAMP stack for this when you are
just beginning. Just start with plain HTML and CSS
and only add PHP and Js later.

Any browser can open a local .html file and interpret
it the same way as if it was served by some server.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#3
What do you mean with that? What is "mechanical" instead
of "organic" and what does that have to do with installing
software?
-"Mechanical," meaning I remember them as they are, and I do not understand why I have to do that.

-"Organic" I understand how and why I have to do this.

Thanks for your help, I've been watching more on youtube than on text instruction Big Grin 

The problem is that if I make a php file, it shows me the white page instead of what I wrote in the file: echo "2 + 1";

And I do not understand why
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#4
(06-10-2019, 09:28 AM)Daniel2213 Wrote: -"Mechanical," meaning I remember them as they are, and I do not understand why I have to do that.

-"Organic" I understand how and why I have to do this.

Ok, I will explain the command.

Code:
sudo apt install gimp


'sudo' will execute everything after it with
root privileges. 'apt' is the package manager,
the program responsible for managing software
and installing them. 'install' tells apt that
you want to install something. 'gimp' is the
target, the package you want to install.





(06-10-2019, 09:28 AM)Daniel2213 Wrote: The problem is that if I make a php file, it shows me the white page instead of what I wrote in the file: echo "2 + 1";

And I do not understand why

Mostlikely because your server does not execute the php
file. There are multiple things that could be wrong here.

Is PHP actually installed on your system?
Is the apache server configured to execute scripts?
Is the file executable?
Is your PHP script actually valid?

Start by confirming whether the script would actually work.
Here is the 'echo' example:

PHP Code:
#!/bin/env php
<?php
echo 1;
?>

You can test the script (which in this example is a file called
'test.php') by executing it with the 'php' command.

Code:
php test.php

If the script is executable, you can also run it like this:

Code:
./test.php

If it is not executable, you can make it executable like this:

Code:
chmod a+x test.php
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#5
(06-10-2019, 09:28 AM)Daniel2213 Wrote: What do you mean with that? What is "mechanical" instead
of "organic" and what does that have to do with installing
software?
-"Mechanical," meaning I remember them as they are, and I do not understand why I have to do that.

-"Organic" I understand how and why I have to do this.

Thanks for your help, I've been watching more on youtube than on text instruction Big Grin 

The problem is that if I make a php file, it shows me the white page instead of what I wrote in the file: echo "2 + 1";

And I do not understand why


SO Leon.P already explain really well, i will not repeat in a different way. I will just tell you this: in all your future linux terminal user life, when you don't understand a command, you can do either:
Code:
apt --help

Or:
Code:
man apt

the --help will give you a list of commands and the man is simply stands for manual. It is basicly a text book.
This 2 commands will both be useful for pretty much any command you'll see. Curl, python, you name it.
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#6
I think he's saying he doesn't understand how to see programs to install? Or something?

When you want to install a program in terminal, you should know the name of the program first and foremost. But if you don't know exactly what it is called, you can search for it with this:


Code:
apt-get search (insert name here)

So for instance, say steam had a lengthier name. You could do:

Code:
apt-get search steam


And the apt would show you a list. But apt will show you everything that is similar to the word steam. So you might have to look up what the real name of the program is.

Also apt may show the dependencies of said applications too. You shouldn't have to install these, they should be installed with the program. But using lutris as an example, if you install a game with lutris, sometimes you need to install other programs that offer extra functionality that said game  you're trying to install might need.

This is why you should research whatever program you want to install first. So you know what you might need, and know exactly how to install it all.

I have no idea about servers and stuff, but figured this might help.
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#7
(06-19-2019, 08:35 PM)savantskie Wrote: I think he's saying he doesn't understand how to see programs to install? Or something?

Hello,
thank you for your help.
I'll give you a real case:
I have the Inscape and Bleach program that I want to update.
(maybe they solved some bags)
How can I see if the update exists in repository or if there is a newer version, and I can install it.
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#8
You are using windows thinking and it does not work the same in linux, with linux for updating purposes it works in general like this:

You install a distro (debian/ubuntu/mint) from a dvd or usb.

Each of those distros have their own repos of software that they have tested on their specific distro (that may or may not be the same version)


When a newer version is released or has a security patch they test it and after the test, if they find no problems they replace the older version in their repo with it.


In the background your personal computer checks the repo periodically and when it sees that an update has occurred it lets you know that it's available for you to use when or if you want to.

That is how the distro keeps itself (as in anything it has installed from the repo) up to date.

Now if you absolutely have to have the newest version of programA and it's not in your distos repo you install a bit of info for your system to use called a PPA, the PPA is maintained by the developer of programA and has the newest version (you install the PPA so that you receive regular updates just like the distro gives you but it is only for the one program the PPA covers), but the downside is it might give you problems with your system as it has not had the amount of testing that the distro repo has.

The third way is to find a .deb (or an .rpm for redhat base distros) file for the distro and do a "one time install", these installs do not update unless you go out and manually check for newer versions.

And the last way I am aware of is to compile from source code.


The way I have these methods listed is generally considered preferential order for installation of software in linux for best stability.
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#9
(06-19-2019, 08:35 PM)savantskie Wrote:
Code:
apt-get search (insert name here)

I guess it should be pointed out that on some distros apt-get won't do searches, you will get an error. 
Instead, use apt.


Code:
apt search ruby

It's a little unclear how apt and apt-get differ. However, Mint chose to put a wrapper in that allows many of the same things to be done with both of the utilities.
I know this is the kind of thing that makes watching different videos confusing, as one command on Ubuntu won't do the same thing on Mint for instance.
Should there be smoke coming from my CPU??
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#10
(06-21-2019, 01:36 PM)Daniel2213 Wrote:
(06-19-2019, 08:35 PM)savantskie Wrote: I think he's saying he doesn't understand how to see programs to install? Or something?

Hello,
thank you for your help.
I'll give you a real case:
I have the Inscape and Bleach program that I want to update.
(maybe they solved some bags)
How can I see if the update exists in repository or if there is a newer version, and I can install it.

Hi there,

The real short answer to this is: if the package comes from the repos and if you installed it from your distro package manager (apt in your example) each times you update/upgrade your distro all your packages will get updates as the same time as the rest of the system. You don't even need to think about it.

The longer answer is:
So if you installed Inscape and bleach through apt with the following command:

Code:
sudo apt install bleach inscape

Or through your GUI package manager, each times you update your system either with the GUI update center or with the comand line :
Code:
sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade

You will have every single package up to date every time.

It also apply to the ubuntu (and derivative) PPA. This is why you don'teven need to worry about the package version: there are nice people working on that for you in the distro staff.

I hope it helped.
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