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Alternatives to Adobe software (with video)
#1
This isn't specific to Linux, but he does a nice presentation of alternatives to Adobe software, including those available to Linux. I'm not into video or photo production, so I'm not sure how accurate it is. I wanted to share it to see what you think.

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#2
I wonder why he missed Acrobat?

I found Qoppa's PDF Studio Pro to be an excellent replacement for Adobe Acrobat Standard. It costs much less than Acrobat Standard, has more features, and it never has an EOL, even after an new version comes out (roughly, every two years). I'm using the Windows version in Win 7 (it's also available for Linux) and, after the initial learning curve (annoying but not horrible), I like it much better than Acrobat Standard. It's also NOT cloud and subscription based!
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#3
(06-06-2019, 03:43 AM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: I wonder why he missed Acrobat?

Mostlikely because most people do not edit PDFs, just view them.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#4
(06-06-2019, 02:12 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(06-06-2019, 03:43 AM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: I wonder why he missed Acrobat?

Mostlikely because most people do not edit PDFs, just view them.

Never worked in an office setting? Also, someone has to make all those PDFs people view.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#5
(06-06-2019, 03:34 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote:
(06-06-2019, 02:12 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(06-06-2019, 03:43 AM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: I wonder why he missed Acrobat?

Mostlikely because most people do not edit PDFs, just view them.

Never worked in an office setting? Also, someone has to make all those PDFs people view.

It does come down to the source creating the PDFs.

It is very easy to create PDFs using LibreOffice or even the print to PDF option.  So one can still edit data say in LibreOffice, text editor, images, whatever and then just use the PDF print option.

Of course if you absolutely have to edit a PDF sent to you then that is an issue. Okular is a good open source option along with some commercial versions such as the one mentioned.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#6
(06-06-2019, 03:34 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: Also, someone has to make all those PDFs people view.

You can create PDFs in a number of ways, like exporting a document in LibreOffice as PDF,
using a markup language, etc. I have never heard of people editing PDFs directly, to be honest.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#7
(06-06-2019, 05:05 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(06-06-2019, 03:34 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: Also, someone has to make all those PDFs people view.

You can create PDFs in a number of ways, like exporting a document in LibreOffice as PDF,
using a markup language, etc. I have never heard of people editing PDFs directly, to be honest.

I edit them frequently. It's also not uncommon in a business, government, or academic setting.

I use many methods of creating PDFs, depending on what I need (and whether I need it to be edited or not; how a PDF is created determines how editable it will be). For example, if I need a PDF of a receipt for an online transaction that can only be printed, I use a virtual printer (PDF Creator is my current weapon program of choice for that). This is fastest and easiest for documents that will fit on a standard paper size page (such as letter or A4) for possible later printing onto paper.

My duplexing ADF scanner can automatically save directly to PDF (and I sometimes edit the resulting PDF later). This works well for  scans of documents of varying sizes into a single PDF that need to retain the original size. I can also scan to JPEG so I can edit the independent images (brightness, contrast, and cropping mostly), then use PDF Studio Pro to combine them into a single PDF.

Many times, I create PDFs using LibreOffice Writer, Calc, or Draw. To ensure I can easily edit the PDF later using LibreOffice, I have it set to embed the original document into the PDF. Then I can just open the PDF in LibreOffice to get full access to the document for editing.

Before I started using LibreOffice for creating PDFs, I used to create PDFs in Acrobat Standard, then PDF Studio Pro when I told Adobe to take a hike (hopefully, off a high cliff). While that resulted in fully editable PDFs, LibreOffice was easier and faster and I didn't care that the resulting PDFs were slightly larger in size due the embedded file and could be edited only in LibreOffice. PDF Studio Pro is still handy for reading PDFs and making some PDFs and for editing downloaded PDFs that need some cleaning up or correction.

The reason I use PDFs so much is they are stable, are multi-platform (Windows, Mac, Linux; PDF stands for Portable Document Form), and will give a reliable reproduction of the original content on any computer using any PDF reader. They can be encrypted to be unreadable without a password or to be read only and uneditable without a password. They can also be made to be searchable.

PDFs can be created in MS Word but they are a bit trickier to make and are uneditable. 

I first started using them back when I was writing Chapbooks for a Renaissance Festival bookstore in Word 2003 and the bookstore staff couldn't print them with earlier versions of Word. PDFs fixed that problem.

I just learned something new about PDF Studio Pro. The windows version can be used to view multipage .tif files as a PDF and even saved as a PDF (actually, I already knew that) but I found out by pure dumb luck while I was looking for something else that it can also create multipage .tif files from a regular multipage PDF (unlike PDFs, .tif files can be tagged). If that function will also work on the Linux version of PDF Studio Pro, I will be so stoked!
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#8
(06-06-2019, 05:05 PM)leon.p Wrote: You can create PDFs in a number of ways, like exporting a document in LibreOffice as PDF,
using a markup language, etc. I have never heard of people editing PDFs directly, to be honest.

Nor have I. I am in business and send customers PDFs specifically because I don't want them edited.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 18.3
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#9
(06-06-2019, 07:55 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: It's also not uncommon in a business, government, or academic setting.

I can not speaak for business or govermnent work, but I have never witnessed
PDF editing in academia, at least not in physics and CS. People usually write
important documents in LaTeX and use PDF only as a way to distribute finished
documents. If someone wants other people to edit their document, they simple
shares the .tex file, which can be edited and compiled on all major operating
systems using a number of different tools and programs. One also usually just
keeps the .tex file isntead of a PDF.

The nice thing with LaTeX (or basically any markup language) is that you can
choose a number of different output formats besides PDF.


This is an example document with my default template I use for anything non-
scientific:

Code:
\documentclass[twoside]{article}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{color}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{changepage}
\usepackage{parskip}
\usepackage{hyphenat}
\usepackage{mathtools}

\geometry{left=25mm,right=25mm,top=20mm,bottom=20mm,bindingoffset=0.0cm}

\begin{document}

\tableofcontents
\newpage

\subsection{I am a subsection}

Here is a paragraph.

Here is another paragraph.

\end{document}


I could compile this into a PDF, a TIFF, a JPEG, etc. The original .tex
file is also usually way smaller than the output files.




(06-06-2019, 07:55 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: [...] if I need a PDF of a receipt for an online transaction that can only be printed, I use a virtual printer (PDF Creator is my current weapon program of choice for that). This is fastest and easiest for documents that will fit on a standard paper size page (such as letter or A4) for possible later printing onto paper.

Is this faster than simply printing the document out and filling it in
with a pen? Because that is what I do for my (admittably usually smaller)
forms and I'd say that is reasonably fast.




(06-06-2019, 07:55 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: My duplexing ADF scanner can automatically save directly to PDF [...]

Now I am envious... Tongue




(06-06-2019, 07:55 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: Many times, I create PDFs using LibreOffice Writer, Calc, or Draw. To ensure I can easily edit the PDF later using LibreOffice, I have it set to embed the original document into the PDF. Then I can just open the PDF in LibreOffice to get full access to the document for editing.

Oh, I did not know one could do that. That actually sound rather
nice for portable but still editable documents.




(06-06-2019, 07:55 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: [...] could be edited only in LibreOffice.

Interesting to see that their is actually some kind of "vendor lock-in"
in FOSS (besides the kernel-incompatabilites between Linux, *BSD, etc).




(06-06-2019, 07:55 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: The reason I use PDFs so much is they are stable, are multi-platform (Windows, Mac, Linux; PDF stands for Portable Document Form), and will give a reliable reproduction of the original content on any computer using any PDF reader.

Oh, I definitely use PDFs myself a lot too, but only for finished things.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#10
[quote pid='4804' dateline='1559858927']

[quote pid='4801' dateline='1559850920']
My duplexing ADF scanner can automatically save directly to PDF [...]
[/quote]

Now I am envious... Tongue


[/quote]

The scanner is a Fujitsu ix500. To use with Linux, since it's not twain compliant so it will be necessary to use a third party universal driver program, such as VueScan (costly but it works well).


(I hate this stupid forum software! How the big fat hairy heck did you break up my posts for responses?)
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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