Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Server
#1
I have now changed all my machines except one over from Windows to Linux. Well everything but my wife's laptop and there is no way I'm suggesting that to her. My main machine is running Mint and my laptop is running Ubuntu 18.04. I have a Dell Latitude E6400 with four megs of ram that I use as a Plex server currently running Windows and I want to install some kind of Linux server that I can access from my home network (and from outside my network if it is easy to do). I currently am using a Raspberry Pi as a sort of semi server but I don't really like the way it works right now. It has nothing to do with my Plex set up. I won't be sharing Plex much if at all to any outside users except for myself and even then it will be used for streaming music 99.9% of the time so my needs are simple.

I am a total newbie and not all that great with the terminal but I'm trying. With that said...

This is what I want to be able to do:
Make my 4TB Elements drive available to anyone in my home network
Make my 1TB HP external drive available to anyone in my home network
Run my Plex server
Run Kodi
I plan on adding one more additional drive so that I can use it as backup 
Ultimately I am going to ditch cable all together and I need to make a media box that is easy to operate, stable as possible and simple as possible for the people in my family. 

I have watched dozens of videos and read tons of stuff on networking, servers, etc and all I've managed to do is get confused. I thought this may be the best place to get some practical advice on what to do. 

Any advice would be appreciated.

Phillip Waters
Reply
#2
I'm sure there are other ways to do it but this is how mine is set up, there is no external usage of my drives or plex but my internal network has access to both.

First I use linuxMint 18.3

I have all drives I want to be shared automount on startup.

Then I install samba like this:

Install samba in mint 18


sudo apt-get install samba --install-recommends

sudo apt install caja-share

sudo apt-get install libsmbclient libwbclient0 python-dnspython python-samba python3-smbc samba samba-common samba-common-bin samba-dsdb-modules samba-libs samba-vfs-modules smbclient

sudo service smbd start


Next I create a file named smb.conf and paste this text into it after changing stuff in brackets () to your names


[global]
server string = (computername that the network sees)
workgroup = WORKGROUP
client max protocol = NT1
security = user
map to guest = Bad User
name resolve order = bcast host wins
include = /etc/samba/smbshared.conf


After that I create a file named smbshared.conf and paste this text into it after changing stuff in brackets () to your names


[(name that you want to show in file manager)]
    force user = (your username)
    path = /home/(your username)/(name of drive - for instance 4tb drive)
    writable = yes
    public = yes

[(name that you want to show in file manager)]
    force user = (your username)
    path = /home/(your username)/(name of drive - for instance 1tb drive)
    writable = yes
    public = yes


Then I open /etc/samba as administrator and paste the 2 files in it and check the permissions to be sure both files are set to root.

After that I restart my computer and make sure the drives I just shared are writable by others and fix permissions if needed.


Next I install plex from the .deb file off the website and make sure it works and grabs the metadata.

Then I just put bookmarks in the web browsers (I use static IPs for internal machines) to access plex (I don't know about using kodi as I see no reason for it with plex installed).
Reply
#3
(05-29-2019, 07:11 PM)spudnuts Wrote: I'm sure there are other ways to do it but this is how mine is set up, there is no external usage of my drives or plex but my internal network has access to both.

First I use linuxMint 18.3

I have all drives I want to be shared automount on startup.

Then I install samba like this:

Install samba in mint 18


sudo apt-get install samba --install-recommends

sudo apt install caja-share

sudo apt-get install libsmbclient libwbclient0 python-dnspython python-samba python3-smbc samba samba-common samba-common-bin samba-dsdb-modules samba-libs samba-vfs-modules smbclient

sudo service smbd start


Next I create a file named smb.conf and paste this text into it after changing stuff in brackets () to your names


[global]
server string = (computername that the network sees)
workgroup = WORKGROUP
client max protocol = NT1
security = user
map to guest = Bad User
name resolve order = bcast host wins
include = /etc/samba/smbshared.conf


After that I create a file named smbshared.conf and paste this text into it after changing stuff in brackets () to your names


[(name that you want to show in file manager)]
    force user = (your username)
    path = /home/(your username)/(name of drive - for instance 4tb drive)
    writable = yes
    public = yes

[(name that you want to show in file manager)]
    force user = (your username)
    path = /home/(your username)/(name of drive - for instance 1tb drive)
    writable = yes
    public = yes


Then I open /etc/samba as administrator and paste the 2 files in it and check the permissions to be sure both files are set to root.

After that I restart my computer and make sure the drives I just shared are writable by others and fix permissions if needed.


Next I install plex from the .deb file off the website and make sure it works and grabs the metadata.

Then I just put bookmarks in the web browsers (I use static IPs for internal machines) to access plex (I don't know about using kodi as I see no reason for it with plex installed).

Thank you SO much! This looks like something I can do on my main machine and still be able to keep my Windows set up. I use it occasionally for work and if I were to wipe that out I would lose that so this may just be the trick. I run 19.1 on my main machine. I'm going to try this on it and see what happens. Thanks again!
Reply
#4
I almost forgot you may want to make the 1tb drive ntfs for your wife or you to be able to use it from windows.

She will be able to stream the movies within her internet browser.
Reply
#5
(05-31-2019, 01:46 AM)spudnuts Wrote: I almost forgot you may want to make the 1tb drive ntfs for your wife or you to be able to use it from windows.

She will be able to stream the movies within her internet browser.

They are both ntfs drives at this point. All my media are on my 4TB drive. I have it all working at this point. Well almost..

From the network tab I go to:
Other Locations
then
Windows Network
then
Workgroup
then
Plex (What I named it)
Then I can see the two drives:
Elements
HP

I can see the drives on my network only I can't access them. 

Pretty sure the problem has to do with permissions. Right now it says "The permissions of "Elements" could not be determined." Same with my HP. I can't figure out how to set permissions. I think I could do it from the terminal if I new how to access the drive from there. What do you think?
Reply
#6
Yes it is permissions and this line comes up if you are in the wrong spot to make the change "The permissions of "Elements" could not be determined.".

The permissions for the drive need to be set to the person you have listed as the forced user in smbshared.conf.

This is one of those cases where it is easier to fix it from the command line if you know how and as an old guy I keep forgetting.


Several posts have info on doing it and also Joe has a couple videos on permissions.
Reply
#7
(06-01-2019, 05:47 PM)spudnuts Wrote: Yes it is permissions and this line comes up if you are in the wrong spot to make the change "The permissions of "Elements" could not be determined.".

The permissions for the drive need to be set to the person you have listed as the forced user in smbshared.conf.

This is one of those cases where it is easier to fix it from the command line if you know how and as an old guy I keep forgetting.


Several posts have info on doing it and also Joe has a couple videos on permissions.

I found this....
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-root /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=84852069-a27b-4d09-8707-d7844bfd9707 /boot           ext2    defaults        0       2
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-swap_1 none            swap    sw              0       0
LABEL=Elements /mnt/Elements auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0
LABEL=HP\040Launcher /mnt/HP\040Launcher auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto 0 0
LABEL=HP /mnt/HP auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0

But I'm not sure what it means and have been scared to fool with it.
Reply
#8
(05-28-2019, 11:18 PM)muddy Wrote: I have now changed all my machines except one over from Windows to Linux. Well everything but my wife's laptop and there is no way I'm suggesting that to her. My main machine is running Mint and my laptop is running Ubuntu 18.04. I have a Dell Latitude E6400 with four megs of ram that I use as a Plex server currently running Windows and I want to install some kind of Linux server that I can access from my home network (and from outside my network if it is easy to do). I currently am using a Raspberry Pi as a sort of semi server but I don't really like the way it works right now. It has nothing to do with my Plex set up. I won't be sharing Plex much if at all to any outside users except for myself and even then it will be used for streaming music 99.9% of the time so my needs are simple.

I am a total newbie and not all that great with the terminal but I'm trying. With that said...

This is what I want to be able to do:
Make my 4TB Elements drive available to anyone in my home network
Make my 1TB HP external drive available to anyone in my home network
Run my Plex server
Run Kodi
I plan on adding one more additional drive so that I can use it as backup 
Ultimately I am going to ditch cable all together and I need to make a media box that is easy to operate, stable as possible and simple as possible for the people in my family. 

I have watched dozens of videos and read tons of stuff on networking, servers, etc and all I've managed to do is get confused. I thought this may be the best place to get some practical advice on what to do. 

Any advice would be appreciated.

Phillip Waters

Hello, I have pondered this post for 2 day and I have 2 cent's I want to through in here...  Rolleyes
I have several questions and observation...

I have been following this thread and Spudnuts has given some good advice...
I would suggest you watch Joe Collins video on adding hard drive and it will answer several questions at once... This video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeR8Rk5LwWU&t=809s

"Question"
1. So if I understand the post correctly, You want to make a "Media Center"...?
2. What is going to be the Media Center? The Windows, Plex system, which is Dell Latitude E6400 Laptop right?
3. I assume the Element and HP drives are USB external drives right? "Watch this video; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeR8Rk5LwWU&t=809s it will explain what to do." 

"Observations"
This all can be done as Spudnuts and I have done, desktop or laptop really don't matter, it is the way you have to configure the drive that are the important thing and brother it can be a "nut buster" until you get your head raped around it. I watch the above video 5 times before it stuck some.
I used a Virtual Machine (Orcale Virtual Box Software) to practice on an followed Joe as he went along, You can do it on a real installation also. I finally got it...

You can use external drive if you leave them on all time I have one like that on my Media center.

As for Plex, Kodi they are ok, but not my cup of tea...[My opinion, to hard to fool with..]

I use a program called Emby Server check it out here; https://emby.media/linux-server.html... Everything is done in your browser and the best part, to watch videos you type the address of the Media server(192.168.1.100/port number{mine is 8096} in your browser and you get a menu like Netflix to watch movies/music... It is way easier, there again my opinion...
Now doing things from outside your network, that will require a VM server, PFsence router to let outside traffect in to your system and that is a whole giant can of worms and beyonce my scope or knowledge. I would not do that, my opinion.... 

"My Mint 18.3 Cinnamon Media Center FSTAB/Samba .conf"

Note, The names have been changed to protect the innocence...

This might help is you can see someones else's stuff. All the info is in the video and I just expanded on it.

You can add Spudnuts "include" part to the smb.conf and it should work. I have used this smb.conf for years. Yes I am a Treky...LOL

As with all things, it will have to be tweaked to work for you...

Note; all drive folders that are mounted to there Folders in the /home/user-name dir,[d-drive] is shared to the network with the "share" function in the Nemo File Manager under the properties for each folder to be shared on the network...

Code:
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# My fstab for Cheyenne-Tv Media center
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/sdh1 during installation
UUID=3bed1384-e2f0-490e-aced-bbf16e566eee /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot was on /dev/sdh4 during installation
UUID=796045f3-129c-48c4-83ae-438e853014e8 /boot           ext4    defaults        0       2
# /home was on /dev/sdh3 during installation
UUID=eee75f3b-5e6d-4e64-afe7-b69a56189e36 /home           ext4    defaults        0       2
# swap was on /dev/sdh5 during installation
UUID=83f02f53-7c72-4819-8a3d-e3f364430f9b none            swap    sw              0       0
#
# My Windows 10 harddrive
UUID=308C429F8C426008 /home/bruce/C-Drive-Max-500-Ide   ntfs    defaults    0   2
#
# This is my "D-Drive-300Gb-Max-Ide" drive Note: All drive names follow Windows
# naming scheme and I use the drive type too.
#
# This is my Home partition
UUID=4a7adb14-15cc-46dc-96c6-6496b3828a27 /home/bruce/  ext4    defaults    0   2
#
# This is my G-drive-3TB-WL-Sata, Note: all drive are labeled the same in the case too.
UUID=91e0318c-4ed6-4c8f-90a2-951205957754 /home/bruce/G-Drive-3TB-WL-Sata   ext4    defaults    0   2
#
# This is H-Drive-2TB-WD-Sata
UUID=09f9d092-e910-4efb-86ab-31b6480eb437 /home/bruce/H-Drive-2TB-WD-Sata   ext4    defaults    0   2
#
# This is I-Drive-3TB-WL-Sata
UUID=258c2edf-73b0-4bd1-af2f-bb244848e77b /home/bruce/I-Drive-3TB-WL-Sata  ext4    defaults    0   2
#
#This is my J-Drive-2TB-WD2-Sata. Note that it is "NTFS" Windows drive storage....
UUID=1040A77340A75DEA /home/bruce/J-Drive-2TB-WD2-Sata  ntfs    defaults    0   2
#
# This is my K-Drive-SG-EXP-2TB-WD-Sata which is a USB external drive which is shared in Nemo to the network.
UUID=045C1B8A5C1B7620 /home/bruce/K-Drive-SG-EXP-2TB-WD-Sata    ntfs    defaults    0   2
#
# This is my L-Drive-2TB-HT-Sata
UUID=a31b641f-3383-4c65-b0e8-7918aef9f56c /home/bruce/L-Drive-2TB-HT-Sata   ext4    defaults    0   2
#
# Note all drives in the FSTAB file point to folders in the /home/user-name main folder and are shared to the network
# with Nemo share in the propriety....
This is my smb.conf. It has worked for years. Hope it helps. Now it is setup for just me to get on as in the set valid users =  part but Spudnuts user part should work just fine...
I use the same one in Linux and Windows...
Code:
#
# Sample configuration file for the Samba suite for Debian GNU/Linux.
#
#
# This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the
# smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed
# here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options most of which 
# are not shown in this example
#
# Some options that are often worth tuning have been included as
# commented-out examples in this file.
#  - When such options are commented with ";", the proposed setting
#    differs from the default Samba behaviour
#  - When commented with "#", the proposed setting is the default
#    behaviour of Samba but the option is considered important
#    enough to be mentioned here
#
# NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command
# "testparm" to check that you have not made any basic syntactic 
# errors. 

#======================= Global Settings =======================

[global]

## Browsing/Identification ###

# Change this to the workgroup/NT-domain name your Samba server will part of
   workgroup = STARFLEET
 passdb backend - tdbsam
 security = user
 usershare owner only = false
 client max protocol = NT1

# server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field
server string = %h server (Samba, Ubuntu)

# Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:
# WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable its WINS Server
   wins support = yes

# WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client
# Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both
;   wins server = w.x.y.z

# This will prevent nmbd to search for NetBIOS names through DNS.
   dns proxy = no

#### Networking ####

# The specific set of interfaces / networks to bind to
# This can be either the interface name or an IP address/netmask;
# interface names are normally preferred
;   interfaces = 127.0.0.0/8 eth0

# Only bind to the named interfaces and/or networks; you must use the
# 'interfaces' option above to use this.
# It is recommended that you enable this feature if your Samba machine is
# not protected by a firewall or is a firewall itself.  However, this
# option cannot handle dynamic or non-broadcast interfaces correctly.
;   bind interfaces only = yes



#### Debugging/Accounting ####

# This tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
# that connects
   log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m

# Cap the size of the individual log files (in KiB).
   max log size = 1000

# If you want Samba to only log through syslog then set the following
# parameter to 'yes'.
#   syslog only = no

# We want Samba to log a minimum amount of information to syslog. Everything
# should go to /var/log/samba/log.{smbd,nmbd} instead. If you want to log
# through syslog you should set the following parameter to something higher.
   syslog = 0

# Do something sensible when Samba crashes: mail the admin a backtrace
   panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d


####### Authentication #######

# Server role. Defines in which mode Samba will operate. Possible
# values are "standalone server", "member server", "classic primary
# domain controller", "classic backup domain controller", "active
# directory domain controller". 
#
# Most people will want "standalone sever" or "member server".
# Running as "active directory domain controller" will require first
# running "samba-tool domain provision" to wipe databases and create a
# new domain.
   server role = standalone server

# If you are using encrypted passwords, Samba will need to know what
# password database type you are using.  
#   passdb backend = tdbsam

   obey pam restrictions = yes

# This boolean parameter controls whether Samba attempts to sync the Unix
# password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB password in the
# passdb is changed.
   unix password sync = yes

# For Unix password sync to work on a Debian GNU/Linux system, the following
# parameters must be set (thanks to Ian Kahan <<kahan@informatik.tu-muenchen.de> for
# sending the correct chat script for the passwd program in Debian Sarge).
   passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u
   passwd chat = *Enter\snew\s*\spassword:* %n\n *Retype\snew\s*\spassword:* %n\n *password\supdated\ssuccessfully* .

# This boolean controls whether PAM will be used for password changes
# when requested by an SMB client instead of the program listed in
# 'passwd program'. The default is 'no'.
   pam password change = yes

# This option controls how unsuccessful authentication attempts are mapped
# to anonymous connections
#   map to guest = bad user

########## Domains ###########

#
# The following settings only takes effect if 'server role = primary
# classic domain controller', 'server role = backup domain controller'
# or 'domain logons' is set 
#

# It specifies the location of the user's
# profile directory from the client point of view) The following
# required a [profiles] share to be setup on the samba server (see
# below)
;   logon path = \\%N\profiles\%U
# Another common choice is storing the profile in the user's home directory
# (this is Samba's default)
#   logon path = \\%N\%U\profile

# The following setting only takes effect if 'domain logons' is set
# It specifies the location of a user's home directory (from the client
# point of view)
;   logon drive = H:
#   logon home = \\%N\%U

# The following setting only takes effect if 'domain logons' is set
# It specifies the script to run during logon. The script must be stored
# in the [netlogon] share
# NOTE: Must be store in 'DOS' file format convention
;   logon script = logon.cmd

# This allows Unix users to be created on the domain controller via the SAMR
# RPC pipe.  The example command creates a user account with a disabled Unix
# password; please adapt to your needs
; add user script = /usr/sbin/adduser --quiet --disabled-password --gecos "" %u

# This allows machine accounts to be created on the domain controller via the 
# SAMR RPC pipe.  
# The following assumes a "machines" group exists on the system
; add machine script  = /usr/sbin/useradd -g machines -c "%u machine account" -d /var/lib/samba -s /bin/false %u

# This allows Unix groups to be created on the domain controller via the SAMR
# RPC pipe.  
; add group script = /usr/sbin/addgroup --force-badname %g

############ Misc ############

# Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration
# on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name
# of the machine that is connecting
;   include = /home/samba/etc/smb.conf.%m

# Some defaults for winbind (make sure you're not using the ranges
# for something else.)
;   idmap uid = 10000-20000
;   idmap gid = 10000-20000
;   template shell = /bin/bash

# Setup usershare options to enable non-root users to share folders
# with the net usershare command.

# Maximum number of usershare. 0 (default) means that usershare is disabled.
   usershare max shares = 100

# Allow users who've been granted usershare privileges to create
# public shares, not just authenticated ones
   usershare allow guests = yes

#======================= Share Definitions =======================

# Un-comment the following (and tweak the other settings below to suit) 
# to enable the default home directory shares. This will share each 
# user's home directory as \\server\username
[Homes]
   comment = Home Directories
   browseable = yes
   available = yes
   valid users = bruce
   read only = no
   public = yes
   writeable = yes

# By default, the home directories are exported read-only. Change the
# next parameter to 'no' if you want to be able to write to them.
;   read only = yes

# File creation mask is set to 0700 for security reasons. If you want to
# create files with group=rw permissions, set next parameter to 0775.
;   create mask = 0700

# Directory creation mask is set to 0700 for security reasons. If you want to
# create dirs. with group=rw permissions, set next parameter to 0775.
;   directory mask = 0700

# By default, \\server\username shares can be connected to by anyone
# with access to the samba server.
# Un-comment the following parameter to make sure that only "username"
# can connect to \\server\username
# This might need tweaking when using external authentication schemes
;   valid users = %S

# Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons
# (you need to configure Samba to act as a domain controller too.)
;[netlogon]
;   comment = Network Logon Service
;   path = /home/samba/netlogon
;   guest ok = yes
;   read only = yes

# Un-comment the following and create the profiles directory to store
# users profiles (see the "logon path" option above)
# (you need to configure Samba to act as a domain controller too.)
# The path below should be writable by all users so that their
# profile directory may be created the first time they log on
;[profiles]
;   comment = Users profiles
;   path = /home/samba/profiles
;   guest ok = no
;   browseable = no
;   create mask = 0600
;   directory mask = 0700

[printers]
   comment = All Printers
   browseable = no
   path = /var/spool/samba
   printable = yes
   guest ok = no
   read only = yes
   create mask = 0700

# Windows clients look for this share name as a source of downloadable
# printer drivers
[print$]
   comment = Printer Drivers
   path = /var/lib/samba/printers
   browseable = yes
   read only = yes
   guest ok = no
# Uncomment to allow remote administration of Windows print drivers.
# You may need to replace 'lpadmin' with the name of the group your
# admin users are members of.
# Please note that you also need to set appropriate Unix permissions
# to the drivers directory for these users to have write rights in it
;   write list = root, @lpadmin

####
# This is my drive that I add to all my /home/bruce folder as a sort of temp/hold folder that is shared...
# This folder is made in the /home/bruce as the path= showes
####

[Defiant-Drive]
   comment = Defiant-Drive Directories
   path = /home/bruce/Defiant-Drive
   browseable = yes
   available = yes
   valid users = bruce
   read only = no
   public = yes
   writeable = yes
For the most part Spudnuts and I have the same setup. Everyone's smb.conf will be and is different with this set and this not set, but they all work the sameway. I like comments in my files so I know what I did to set them up. If you add a "#" or ";" in the .conf files linux just pass's them by... Hope this helps some...

As for your last post, what is it... That is some form of a FSTAB file but I have not seen that kind before... Where did you get it?
Code:
I found this....[/color]
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-root /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
/boot was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=84852069-a27b-4d09-8707-d7844bfd9707 /boot           ext2    defaults        0       2
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-swap_1 none            swap    sw              0       0
LABEL=Elements /mnt/Elements auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0
LABEL=HP\040Launcher /mnt/HP\040Launcher auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto 0 0
LABEL=HP /mnt/HP auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0

But I'm not sure what it means and have been scared to fool with it.

That looks like the old way to writing "FSTAB's" ... it is using the OLD ext2 file system...
 The new way is using what is called UUID's which is explained in Joe's video... 
Joe's video is the key... Good luck!!! Smile


(06-01-2019, 06:06 PM)muddy Wrote:
(06-01-2019, 05:47 PM)spudnuts Wrote: Yes it is permissions and this line comes up if you are in the wrong spot to make the change "The permissions of "Elements" could not be determined.".

The permissions for the drive need to be set to the person you have listed as the forced user in smbshared.conf.

This is one of those cases where it is easier to fix it from the command line if you know how and as an old guy I keep forgetting.


Several posts have info on doing it and also Joe has a couple videos on permissions.

I found this....
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-root /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=84852069-a27b-4d09-8707-d7844bfd9707 /boot           ext2    defaults        0       2
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-swap_1 none            swap    sw              0       0
LABEL=Elements /mnt/Elements auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0
LABEL=HP\040Launcher /mnt/HP\040Launcher auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto 0 0
LABEL=HP /mnt/HP auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0

But I'm not sure what it means and have been scared to fool with it.

My guess this is the installations "fstab" file that was made when installing whatever Mint you are using.  I think those are your USB drives that are mounted in the /mnt folder in the file system...
Strange setup for sure, got me with the 040launcher, not a clue.... Sorry!
You would have to go the "Man page" for "fstab" to see what all the settings mean....
see my other post....
**********************************************************
Taglines of the Day:
Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.  Huh 

Everybody remember where we parked. - Kirk

To Boldly Go Where No BBS Has Gone Before. USS Stargazer BBS, Sheridan In.
Reply
#9
I have a Ubuntu 18.10 headless (No desktop) server that houses some movies and ton's of files and my Music collection.
I mount the music folder on the server into all my desktops so I can use any music app to play them. I found this on "AskUbuntu" and is works great!
With some changes you can just about share anything... Big Grin
Give it a look and try it out... Later!

Code:
# Here is the process I used that I found on "Ask Ubuntu" web site:
#
This worked for me:

# Before we get started, open a TERMINAL: "Ctrl+Alt+ T" on most Ubuntu base Distro's...
sudo apt-get install cifs-utils
or
sudo apt install cifs-utils

# Created a hidden text file called 'smbcredentials' in my home folder.
# Now, "In Your Open Terminal" type the following:
echo >.smbcredentials

# Change the permissions of the file to prevent unwanted access to your credentials:
chmod 600 ~/.smbcredentials

# Now edit the newly created ".smbcredentials" file like this:
gedit or nano ~/.smbcredentials

# Add these 2 lines to the ".smbcredentials" (this was my remote samba user account details):
username=Your server Login Name
password=Your server Login Password

# Save the file and close the editor...:

# I created a folder in my /home/Your_folder/Music folder called "ServerMusic"..:
# Now open Terminal again, and change to the ~/music folder like this:
# At the prompt type..
>$ cd ~/Music

# Now type this to make a new "ServerMusic" folder:
mkdir /home/your_folder/Music/ServerMusic

# We need to edit the "fstab" but we need to make a backup just in case something FooBars...
# Open a terminal and type this:
sudo cp /etc/fstab fstab.old
# Now "hit enter" now you can "ls" the /etc directory and you should have a fstab and fstab.old files. If the we can continue:....

# Now we need to edit the /etc/ fstab file:
sudo gedit or nano /etc/fstab

# Then added the line below to the bottom of your fstab file:

//192.168.x.xxx/Music /home/your_folder/Music/ServerMusic cifs auto,credentials=/home/your_folder/.smbcredentials,iocharset=utf8

Our line will look like the:
//192.168.5.300/starbase/Master_Music_Processed_Files /home/your-name-here/Music/ServerMusic cifs auto,credentials=/home/your-name-here/.smbcredentials,iocharset=utf8

# Now save the "fstab" file and close the editor...
# Now type in the terminal the following command to test to see if the new folder will be loaded automatically when the system boots:
sudo mount -a

# After typing the mount -a command you should go back to a plain command prompt... If there is a error it will be displayed and you will have to fix it in the "fstab" or it will not work and the system will now boot to the desktop and the system will halt booting....
Good luck and enjoy your new Music folder..... Bruce
Have fun and enjoy the Music!
Big Grin
**********************************************************
Taglines of the Day:
Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.  Huh 

Everybody remember where we parked. - Kirk

To Boldly Go Where No BBS Has Gone Before. USS Stargazer BBS, Sheridan In.
Reply
#10
(06-01-2019, 06:06 PM)muddy Wrote:
(06-01-2019, 05:47 PM)spudnuts Wrote: Yes it is permissions and this line comes up if you are in the wrong spot to make the change "The permissions of "Elements" could not be determined.".

The permissions for the drive need to be set to the person you have listed as the forced user in smbshared.conf.

This is one of those cases where it is easier to fix it from the command line if you know how and as an old guy I keep forgetting.


Several posts have info on doing it and also Joe has a couple videos on permissions.

I found this....
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-root /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=84852069-a27b-4d09-8707-d7844bfd9707 /boot           ext2    defaults        0       2
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-swap_1 none            swap    sw              0       0
LABEL=Elements /mnt/Elements auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0
LABEL=HP\040Launcher /mnt/HP\040Launcher auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto 0 0
LABEL=HP /mnt/HP auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0

But I'm not sure what it means and have been scared to fool with it.

That is your fstab file it just tells linux how and where to mount drives when it starts up, looking at it this part is what was written when you installed linux initially,

# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-root /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=84852069-a27b-4d09-8707-d7844bfd9707 /boot           ext2    defaults        0       2
/dev/mapper/mint--vg-swap_1 none            swap    sw              0       0


and this part was when you told it to automount additional partitions,

LABEL=Elements /mnt/Elements auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0
LABEL=HP\040Launcher /mnt/HP\040Launcher auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto 0 0
LABEL=HP /mnt/HP auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0


the first section is by UUID the second by LABEL and there are other ways to mount them also that have pros and cons for mounting options, but as you can see the file can use multiple formats within a single file.
As for fooling with it, unless it's not mounting stuff you want it to there is no reason to do so.



It's usually something dumb so I'm going to ask are you trying to fix the permissions from the machine that is mounting the drives or from a different one?
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)