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Build ur own computer
#1
Am thinking of building my own computer,but a little scared about compatibility.What is the best way to find out which components are compatible with current versions of Linux,such as Ubuntu 18.04?A lot of the info around seems to be dated.There are not many companies in Canada building Linux machines,and the dollar exchange rate is  prohibitive right now.I would need to win a lottery to afford to by a computer from the USA.(sorry guys,thats the way it is).
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#2
I personally don't even bother checking hardware for linux because it covers so much, that being said I also don't build cutting edge machines.
My main/newest machine is a HP z400 workstation 3.07 ghz zeon 4Tib in hard drives 20 gb memory and a gtx 650 ti boost video card.
The cost of my machine is about 250usd as all of it is used parts from ebay.

Being unsure if you are scared of just comparability or if this is also your first time building your own I would recommend using old parts that you won't feel bad if you break them, you can also practice installing linux on it as well.
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#3
Like Spudnuts I recommend that you use used hardware. However there are reasons to buy new.

You can also buy both new and used.

Regardless of what you are buying, simply looking up "the part you are looking to buy Linux" should very quickly show compatibility.
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#4
(04-28-2019, 04:15 PM)NoWinBob Wrote: Am thinking of building my own computer,but a little scared about compatibility.What is the best way to find out which components are compatible with current versions of Linux,such as Ubuntu 18.04?A lot of the info around seems to be dated.There are not many companies in Canada building Linux machines,and the dollar exchange rate is  prohibitive right now.I would need to win a lottery to afford to by a computer from the USA.(sorry guys,thats the way it is).

Hi NoWinBon,

I have build my own pc about 6 months ago. These are my specs: MoBo: aorus x470 ultra gaming Socket AM4, Ryzen 1700x cpu, 500Gb ssd Samsung 850 evo, 2Tb spinning hd, Radeon RX570 8Gb Oc, Be Quiet cpu cooler, 16 gb Ram at 3200Mhz Gskill Ripjaw, Corsair RM750 psu. I shoeforked it all into a BeQuiet PC case.
These hardware specs are put together to have redundancy in the future, like overclock-able cpu and gpu.
The total system cost is about 1000 euro's (1292 us dollar)

Hope it helped out a bit
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#5
(04-28-2019, 04:15 PM)NoWinBob Wrote: Am thinking of building my own computer,but a little scared about compatibility.What is the best way to find out which components are compatible with current versions of Linux,such as Ubuntu 18.04?A lot of the info around seems to be dated.There are not many companies in Canada building Linux machines,and the dollar exchange rate is  prohibitive right now.I would need to win a lottery to afford to by a computer from the USA.(sorry guys,thats the way it is).

As I am coming from the Windows environment and having installed both Ubuntu 18.04 and Mint 19.01 I found Mint is a good start. Initially I ran into Graphic issue and after checking on the System Monitor I found out that my CPU can't cope with the system but luckily I have an old Graphic Card lying around and after installing it Mint works smoothly.
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#6
Used hdwr sounds like fun.I have gotten pretty good service out of clunkers with some upgrades such as more RAM and swapping HDD for SSD.One thing I notice with the premium Linux builders such as System 76: they don't offer quad core.Makes me wonder how fast I can get a dual core machine using a fast clock speed.I probably dont do enough high demand computing to need 4 cores anyway.I will have to try some photo editing on my old dual core laptop.

(04-28-2019, 09:27 PM)p-murphy Wrote: Like Spudnuts I recommend  that you use used hardware. However there are reasons to buy new.

You can also buy both new and used.

Regardless of what you are buying, simply looking up "the part you are looking to buy Linux" should very quickly show compatibility.

Yea,I guess I was doing it backwards;just find what is available,then do a search.Thanks for the tip.
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#7
I have built many systems for clients, businesses, and myself to run only Linux.

Asus mainboards have never rejected Linux and always work.  They are preferred vendor other than Supermicro.  I have also heard good things about Asrock.  Still for desktops I stick to Asus and zero failures.  In fact in modern Asus mainboards you can even leave secureboot on.

As for video cards never had an Nvidia card rejected.  In general I personally stick with Asus, MSI, or eVGA video cards but they always work fine with zero issues.  I know ATI is getting better but I still consider them a gamble.

As for hard drives I have never seen Linux reject anything so take your pick.  I personally prefer Western Digital for spinning and Intel for SSD.

Intel CPUs seem to play nicer than AMD CPU which are getting better.  I personally stick with Intel CPUs (for now at least).

The only thing that can be a hassle is the sound card.  Some work immediately while others require some tweaking.

All other standard parts like RAM (G.skill my preferred vendor), monitors, speakers, keyboard, mice, optical (DVD, BluRay), fans, power supply (I prefer Seasonic followed by Antec), UPS, case, etc never had any issues.

Printers can be iffy.  Most Canon's seem to work fine but a few models get grumpy.

Last system I built for a client had zero issues:

Intel Core i5-9600K, ASUS ROG Strix Z390-H Mainboard, LG GH24NSC0B 24x Internal, Cooler Master MasterAir MA610P, ASUS VP247QG 23.6" Full HD 75Hz VGA HDMI DP FreeSync Gaming LED Monitor, CyberPower Systems 12-Outlet 950VA, G.Skill Ripjaws V 16GB 2 x 8GB DDR4-2666, Intel 660p Series M.2 2280 1TB, ASUS GeForce GTX 1060, Seasonic USA Focus Gold 650 Watt 80 Plus, Corsair ML120 (x4), Logitech K120 Wired Keyboard, Corsair mid tower (don't remember model), client picked some Creative Speakers and trackball.

This system installed Ubuntu MATE 18.04 with zero issues and all hardware worked without any tweaking.  The client is super happy.

FYI: Don't forget to use good thermal paste like Noctua NT-H1.

So:

Mainboard: Asus, Supermicro (confirmed zero issues)
RAM: Any vendor (G.Skill my preferred)
CPU: Intel (zero issues), AMD (getting better)
CPU Coolor: Any
CPU Paste: Any (strongly recommend Noctua)
Video Card: Nvidia (zero issues - MSI, Asus, eVGA my preferred), ATI getting better
Sound Card: All have worked although some need tweaking - most new on board
Storage: Any (if possible go M.2 and I recommend Intel or WD for spinning)
Power Supply: Any (However don't go cheap as poor quality will damage parts IMO Seasonic is the best period follow by Antec - many Antecs are rebadged Seasonics)
Monitor: Any
Speakers: Any
Optical: Any
Mice: Any (although not all special features may work)
Keyboard: Any (although not all special features may work)
Printer: Canon, HP seem to work well
UPS: Any
Case: Any (pick one with good air flow)
Case fans: Any (I highly recommend the Corsair ML120 as they are mag lev)
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#8
Thanks,Jeremy.Good info.I particularly wondered about mainboard and CPU.Probably go with onboard video,not sure about audio.BTW ,I just bought a Brother DCP-L2550 laser combo printer;works fine except for the wireless,which I dont care about.It was faster to go buy a cable than to try to get the wireless drivers installed.
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#9
I agree with most of what Cleverwise said...
I too use mainly Asrock, ASUS, but I have had good luck with Gigabyte. I am a AMD guy mostly, yes I have Intel's (used system), I have not had any issues and I have 3 AMD "4 core's", 5 Athlon X2's 4400's and I have never had any issues. I use mostly Micron ram from there website. That is the only thing that I always buy new..

The video cards are all AMD/ATI cards. All of them have HDMI as a output and are various flavors. I don't have monitors, except for the Ubuntu headless server and the NAS video/music server in the back room and they share the same monitor... <G>
I use 31" Element TV's on the HDMI port on the video cards. I don't play games, so these work great for watching and editing movies.... 

Always use loads of ram, ram is GOOD! I try to load the Mobo with as much as I can afford at the time.
All the other stuff is as Cleverwise said.... Big Grin
Sometimes a  mixture of old and new parts is a good way to go. I never have had any issues mixing them. Some say always use new Mobo's and so on. I look for Combo's on eBay where I can get a 2 year old (or so) Mobo, Cpu, Ram, Cooler all together for cheap.
I always check the feedbacks and have had good luck.
I'm one of those guys that old is just as good... LOL

The main thing that no has mentioned, " Have Fun building it"
Later!

P.S.
"The old PC adage is: Look at the beta, watch version 1, 2, Buy version 3, 90% of the bugs are fixed and it might work on your 386 now...."  Smile
" Those Were The Days"
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Taglines of the Day:
Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.  Huh 

Everybody remember where we parked. - Kirk

To Boldly Go Where No BBS Has Gone Before. USS Stargazer BBS, Sheridan In.
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#10
As for why system76 uses 2 core machines I can't say for sure, but mine has a xeon that is 4 core 8 thread and gives no problems for me but unless you like to do lots of odd things it isn't really needed for most people and with new systems it probably is a cost thing.
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