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Every distro just makes motherboard freeze? (on splash screen)
#1
Hi all. I'm trying to switch over to Linux as my daily os, from Windows. But I'm having some kind of issue where my computer just freezes on the motherboard splash screen. I tried dual booting on my gaming rig about a year ago, and I got the same issue. So I gave up for awhile.

Eventually I put together a dedicated linux rig, hoping that would solve the problem. For some reason, I'm still getting the exact same issue, on this other computer. Just like when I tried dual booting on the gaming rig, this new rig will boot into my distro a few times. You may get 5 reboots out of it. But then eventually it just freezes on the motherboard splash screen, and will never boot the distro again.

You've got to reinstall something in order to get it booting again. And because of that, it seems to me like this is either a bios or a bootloader issue. Has anyone else ever had this problem? Where you'd install linux, only to have the computer start freezing on the motherboard splash screen? Its totally locked up, you can't press Delete or F8 or anything, you just have to hold down the power button and turn it off. At first I thought maybe it was some kind of a flaw in the distro, or for some reason it just didn't like my hardware. So I tried Zorin, Kde Neon, and Linux Mint. I had the same problem with all 3. I don't hold out any hope that any other distro would be any different. So I've got to solve the problem first, before I can even begin to learn linux and settle on a distribution.

Here are the rig specs that I'm currently trying to install Linux on.

Dedicated Linux Rig:

Biostar T-series motherboard from 2006
Intel Core2duo 6600 processor
Samsung evo SSD 250Gb
Creative Xfi Sound card
Nvidia GT 620 video card
4Gb of DDR2 Kingston brand
Corsair 400 watt power supply
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#2
Zorin, Kde Neon, and Linux Mint are all real heavyweights, processor and ram intensive. Poor choice for your machine with little horsepower by today's standards.

Maybe you should try a lighter Linux disto. There are many to choose from.
I use Debian with the Mate desktop exclusively... on more than a half a dozen machines I maintain.

On almost all of those machines I do test installs many, including Zorin, Kde Neon, and Linux Mint... night and day, and problematic.
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#3
Go into bios and change it to show verbose (I can't think of the right word) booting so you can see the messages as it boots.

Is any of the hardware on the new rig from the other machine that was doing the same thing ?
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#4
(03-24-2019, 03:02 PM)mexsudo Wrote: Zorin, Kde Neon, and Linux Mint are all real heavyweights, processor and ram intensive. Poor choice for your machine with little horsepower by today's standards.

Maybe you should try a lighter Linux disto. There are many to choose from.
I use Debian with the Mate desktop exclusively... on more than a half a dozen machines I maintain.

On almost all of those machines I do test installs many, including Zorin, Kde Neon, and Linux Mint... night and day, and problematic.

4Gb of Ram and an older dual core should be more than enough. Mint says it will run fine on a Pentium 4, which is several generations older than the core2duo that I'm using.

(03-24-2019, 06:49 PM)spudnuts Wrote: Go into bios and change it to show verbose (I can't think of the right word) booting so you can see the messages as it boots.

Is any of the hardware on the new rig from the other machine that was doing the same thing ?

No none of the hardware is shared, its all different components. Its a gaming rig that is much newer than the dedicated Linux rig I built out of spare parts I had laying around.
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#5
All the distros you tried are based on Ubuntu which currently has a bug that prevents it form booting on core2duos.

Try a distro that is not based on a new version of ubuntu.
I would recommend Linux Mint 18.3, MX-Linux or Manjaro.
However MX-Linux and Manjaro are not new user friendly
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#6
(03-25-2019, 02:07 AM)p-murphy Wrote: All the distros you tried are based on Ubuntu which currently has a bug that prevents it form booting on core2duos.

Try a distro that is not based on a new version of ubuntu.
I would recommend Linux Mint 18.3, MX-Linux or Manjaro.
However MX-Linux and Manjaro are not new user friendly

Well back when I attempted the dual boot, the processor was a core I5 3570k. This was about a year ago. It was the same issue, just freezing on the motherboard splash screen. Then again, that could just be the problems of dual booting, who knows.

I can't say I'm all that impressed with MX Linux. But Solus on the other hand, I like the cut of their jib. Would you guys recommend that I try Solus?
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#7
(03-24-2019, 11:10 AM)bennylava Wrote: Hi all. I'm trying to switch over to Linux as my daily os, from Windows. But I'm having some kind of issue where my computer just freezes on the motherboard splash screen. I tried dual booting on my gaming rig about a year ago, and I got the same issue. So I gave up for awhile.

Eventually I put together a dedicated linux rig, hoping that would solve the problem. For some reason, I'm still getting the exact same issue, on this other computer. Just like when I tried dual booting on the gaming rig, this new rig will boot into my distro a few times. You may get 5 reboots out of it. But then eventually it just freezes on the motherboard splash screen, and will never boot the distro again.

You've got to reinstall something in order to get it booting again. And because of that, it seems to me like this is either a bios or a bootloader issue. Has anyone else ever had this problem? Where you'd install linux, only to have the computer start freezing on the motherboard splash screen? Its totally locked up, you can't press Delete or F8 or anything, you just have to hold down the power button and turn it off. At first I thought maybe it was some kind of a flaw in the distro, or for some reason it just didn't like my hardware. So I tried Zorin, Kde Neon, and Linux Mint. I had the same problem with all 3. I don't hold out any hope that any other distro would be any different. So I've got to solve the problem first, before I can even begin to learn linux and settle on a distribution.

Here are the rig specs that I'm currently trying to install Linux on.

Dedicated Linux Rig:

Biostar T-series motherboard from 2006
Intel Core2duo 6600 processor
Samsung evo SSD 250Gb
Creative Xfi Sound card
Nvidia GT 620 video card
4Gb of DDR2 Kingston brand
Corsair 400 watt power supply
Hi, I ran into a similar problem with a thinkpad some time ago, i was able to solve it by first completely wiping the hard drive and then going into the bios and changing the security to legeacy, i know that most destros can work with effi i think its called but some older equipment wont .. setting it to legecy should solve this as well as turning secure boot to disable..hope that helps ..cheers
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#8
Well I found out what the problem is. I have a USB switch, cause I don't want to have to unplug everything from my gaming rig, (main rig) and plug it into the linux rig every time I want to use the linux rig. So I'd just hit the switch, and everything would switch over. Nice and easy. Linux does NOT like it when you do that in the middle of the boot process lol. If you just wait until the OS is fully booted and you're looking at the desktop, it doesn't care. Everything works fine. But if you try and do that while its booting up, it will freeze on the motherboard splash screen. Yall were right about disabling the splash screen, I could see that it froze right when it got to checking the USB stuff.

I think the only reason I didn't catch it sooner, was that it wasn't doing it when I was booting windows. Windows I guess is more tolerant of that and it would just go ahead and accept it. So all I've got to do, is simply wait until linux is booted to hit the usb switch. Then it recognizes that it just had several new USB devices plugged in, and all is well. Thanks to all for the help!
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#9
I would say the reason is that linux checks hardware everytime it boots so that it runs properly at startup (thus you are breaking the hardware check with the switch ) and windows does not check until after it has finished starting.
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#10
(03-26-2019, 10:58 PM)spudnuts Wrote: I would say the reason is that linux checks hardware everytime it boots so that it runs properly at startup (thus you are breaking the hardware check with the switch ) and windows does not check until after it has finished starting.

Seems better to check after its finished starting.
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