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Your First Computer
#21
(01-05-2019, 01:26 AM)Richard Wrote: An Apple II in 1983. People came from miles around to see it and play with it.

Richard

I wonder how much a collector would pay for a 1983 Apple II?  :-)
Idea  Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.

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#22
Mine first system was a Gateway 2000 386sx back in 1991.  Not sure how much RAM it had, but was running Windows 3.0 on it.  It had an 80Mb HD and I later upgraded to a 200Mb, which set me back about $400!

I also had an Epson dot matrix printer and this Logitech ScanMan 256 hand scanner that looked like the bottom half of a Kirby vacuum cleaner.

Trying to remember how much I paid for all of this back then but I know it was around $2000-$3000.

A year or two later I obtained another system from a friend I ran a 24 hour bulletin board service along with a dedicated phone line.  I ran all of this on DESQview, which was a text mode multitasking operating environment.

Fun times back then.

--Guy
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#23
My first computer was a commodore 64 that a friend of the family that worked at the local landfill brought over and gave to me. This was in the mid 90's (I was six and knew or cared nothing for computers) , but this became a shinny new toy and came with a bunch of tapes and floppy drives. It came with a few games, but was mostly business and accounting software so I would think it was just a business had upgraded its computer. (Computers were not very common in my town in the 90's)
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#24
Does the Sinclair ZX spectrum count? That was the first family computer bought in 1983.

CPU: Zilog Z80 @3.5MHz
RAM: 48KB
OS: Sinclair BASIC on 16KB ROM

The first computer that I personally owned was a Compaq. It was a refurbished machine I bought at a computer fair, sometime between '96 and '98

Intel 66MHz DX CPU
16MB RAM
850MB HDD
Windows '95
2x CD-ROM drive
14.4Kbps modem

I have a few interesting stories to tell of my first experiences with PC's, all down to my inexperience, for another thread though maybe.
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#25
Sure you had to ask !!!!!

Talk about a serious serious disappointment. Why ? Because despite being extremely disappointed back when I was little I managed to get really good at fixing
Windows machines, So I can only imaging where I would be computer wise if I had the right machine at the right time .

Now the rest of the story....

So I am in computer class at school. We are learning Apple with the green screen.
My Teacher had another passion a Commodore 64.

A lot of the kids in the class had their own Commodore 64's
Well my Grandmother purchased a Commodore 64 Plus 4 for me .
I bring it to school and no one , not even the teacher knew how to use it .
I never got anywhere with it.
I lost all interest in computers , until seen someone use one to go online to AOL.
this was many many years later of course. I been hooked ever since.
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#26
OMG Ancient history.
Well there was a homebrew 6502 made out of bare boards from OSI.  Also a DEC LSI-11 (PDP-11) I put together from dead bodies found in salvage (I used to work for Digital).   Then there was a Z80 'Big Board' kit running CP/M, my first computer that was actually useful.  Finally I bought an IBM XT clone running DOS (back in the 80's).

My first machine running Linux was built out of parts from 'Taiwan Row' in Miami (Fl).  It was a socket-7 running a K6-233.  It hat 64mb or memory, was running Debian with X-11 (1996 IIRC).  Since then, I've mostly built computers from parts (motherboards, memory, cpu, etc).  My current machine is a Dell refurb from ebay.  It was upgraded with an SSD, dual head video card, and a bigger power supply.  Goes by the net name of 'PenguinInTheDell' :-).
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#27
(01-21-2019, 01:24 AM)Prototype Wrote: Does the Sinclair ZX spectrum count?  That was the first family computer bought in 1983.

CPU: Zilog Z80 @3.5MHz
RAM: 48KB
OS: Sinclair BASIC on 16KB ROM

The first computer that I personally owned was a Compaq. It was a refurbished machine I bought at a computer fair,  sometime between '96 and '98

Intel 66MHz DX CPU
16MB RAM
850MB HDD
Windows '95
2x CD-ROM drive
14.4Kbps modem

I have a few interesting stories to tell of my first experiences with PC's, all down to my inexperience, for another thread though maybe.

Oh my word, I had forgotten all about the Sinclair computers until you mentioned it.   :-)
Idea  Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.

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#28
Coleco Adam
64 k of ram
32 k rom
Z80 processor 4.77 Meg, hts..
Cassette Data drives 256k
the Rom booted into a typewriter ; lots of university kids used it later
The Cassette loaded into Adam Basic , somewhat compatible with Apple basic except for the peeks and pokes to Ram.
only code available was from magazines.
Was pres. of the Edmonton Alberta Users Group (EAUG) when Coleco dumped support.
( the data drive motors would burn out.)
tough part of programming was it's closed source ; but I did get a 5th ? printed photocopy of the source code (very blurry)
Dos 3.2 to Win 10.
Main - Cinnamon 19.2
   Resistance Is Not Futile!
       It's voltage divided by current
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#29
(12-19-2018, 01:30 AM)deck_luck Wrote: Tell us your story about your first computer.   

Please include topics like:

                   Hardware:  cpu, memory, storage devices, monitors, etc.
                   Software:  OS as well as your favorite applications or development tools.
                   Likes:   (favorite app, great tactile keyboard)
                   Dislikes:   (fans sound like a jet engine, a good portable heater)

I was first introduced to what was called a computer when in college I took a programming class about FORTRAN. I never saw the computer but I was told it consumed the entire 2nd floor of the building where it was housed. I punched each line of instruction onto an IBM card that needed to be kept in the order that the computer needed to read so the program would run. The typed program cards were transported to a different building where the card reader was housed. I had to wait my turn to have my program run through the card reader that sent the programming instructions to a compiler then if there were no errors detected the program would run and I would later receive a printed output of the results of my program on 132 column wide print, fanfold paper. I never had a program run without an error on my first try. My programming instructor, usually a graduate student, never gave the students a sample program to run to see how a working program worked. Everything learned was the most difficult way possible. Computer advancement was improving rapidly. By early 1979, the Programming Department was phasing out the punch card system to allotted 1K storage for students using dumb terminals in a computer lab. There was no instruction on how to use the dumb terminals nor the operating system that controlled the computer. Students had to either ask the lab graduate student for help, they were usually reluctant to help undergraduate students, or stand in line to read the single copy of the manual for the IBM Unix operating system. Much time was wasted learning how to use the terminal well enough to enter a program into my 1K storage area, and access the programming language from the main frame computer so I could enter computer instructions. Upon completion of the FORTRAN basic class I was alloted an additional 3K storage for my Advanced FORTRAN class.

I purchased my first computer from Tandy Radio Shack in late 1979 for just under $1200. The system came in one huge box that was nearly at waist height for me. I am 6ft-04in. In the box was the computer, a black and white CRT (monitor), a power supply, cables and manuals, and a cassette tape recorder for storage of computer programs and reading Radio Shack application programs from cassette tape. The computer came with 4K of RAM. Something that I learned quickly would be useful for the computer to run more efficiently. To put into perspective the price I paid for this computer, in 1975 I purchased a new 1975 Volkswagen Dasher station wagon for just under $2300. The $1100 price for a new computer seemed to hover in that range until the around 1995 when a person could buy parts and build their own computer for less than a commercial brand. I found learning how to use the Radio Shack Model One Level Two computer was much easier than my experience with the college main frame. The manual that came with the RS computer was more specific more condensed than the 7-inch thick Unix manual at the computer department programming lab on campus. My use of the RS computer was to learn more programming languages while on hiatus from college and to keep paperless financial recorders. I soon learned that going exclusively paperless was not happening anytime soon. This RS computer didn't have an operating system. It used an interpreter with the programming embedded on an EPROM. The first computer I purchase with an actual operating system was the "so-called" toy Commodore 64. I could run CP/M or CBMDOS. This was the first computer that I used a floppy disk drive rather than a cassette player/recorder to load or store programs and run the operating system. I never understood the operating system but learned how to manipulate it to my advantage. The Commodore C-64 came with 64K of RAM. That was a big deal in early 1982 and later. The REU, RAM Expansion Unit was developed making additional memory available for those that could afford the extra expense. The monitor that I purchased with the C-64 could be used as B&W or color. A distinct advantage of the RS-Mod-I-Level-II.

The C-64 was the first personal computer I used that had an operating system. Anyone born after 1980 has no clue how archaic the computer was in its early days/years but it did evolve. My favorite applications were BASIC, FORTRAN, and DBMS where I could program something useful and specific to my need. The early computers were a combination keyboard and the computer as one unit. Although the touch of the keys was similar to the touch of an IBM Selectric Typewriter (for you youngsters this was a mechanical, sometime electrically powered, typing device that used a single sheet of paper that the user advanced on line at a time and arms connected to the keys hammered against the paper. An inked cloth ribbon would raise up between the striking hammer and the paper to produce a printed character on the paper.) the position where the user needed to rest their hands for typing was awkward without an extension the same height as the top of the front of the keyboard. The user had no choice but to adapt to the existing keyboard. When computers began construction with the keyboard as a separate input device connected to the computer by a wire interchangeability of keyboards became possible.

-- Terry Morris
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#30
(02-26-2019, 06:09 PM)kb8amz Wrote:
(12-19-2018, 01:30 AM)deck_luck Wrote: Tell us your story about your first computer.   

Please include topics like:

                   Hardware:  cpu, memory, storage devices, monitors, etc.
                   Software:  OS as well as your favorite applications or development tools.
                   Likes:   (favorite app, great tactile keyboard)
                   Dislikes:   (fans sound like a jet engine, a good portable heater)

I was first introduced to what was called a computer when in college I took a programming class about FORTRAN. I never saw the computer but I was told it consumed the entire 2nd floor of the building where it was housed. I punched each line of instruction onto an IBM card that needed to be kept in the order that the computer needed to read so the program would run. The typed program cards were transported to a different building where the card reader was housed. I had to wait my turn to have my program run through the card reader that sent the programming instructions to a compiler then if there were no errors detected the program would run and I would later receive a printed output of the results of my program on 132 column wide print, fanfold paper. I never had a program run without an error on my first try. My programming instructor, usually a graduate student, never gave the students a sample program to run to see how a working program worked. Everything learned was the most difficult way possible. Computer advancement was improving rapidly. By early 1979, the Programming Department was phasing out the punch card system to allotted 1K storage for students using dumb terminals in a computer lab. There was no instruction on how to use the dumb terminals nor the operating system that controlled the computer. Students had to either ask the lab graduate student for help, they were usually reluctant to help undergraduate students, or stand in line to read the single copy of the manual for the IBM Unix operating system. Much time was wasted learning how to use the terminal well enough to enter a program into my 1K storage area, and access the programming language from the main frame computer so I could enter computer instructions. Upon completion of the FORTRAN basic class I was alloted an additional 3K storage for my Advanced FORTRAN class.

I purchased my first computer from Tandy Radio Shack in late 1979 for just under $1200. The system came in one huge box that was nearly at waist height for me. I am 6ft-04in. In the box was the computer, a black and white CRT (monitor), a power supply, cables and manuals, and a cassette tape recorder for storage of computer programs and reading Radio Shack application programs from cassette tape. The computer came with 4K of RAM. Something that I learned quickly would be useful for the computer to run more efficiently. To put into perspective the price I paid for this computer, in 1975 I purchased a new 1975 Volkswagen Dasher station wagon for just under $2300. The $1100 price for a new computer seemed to hover in that range until the around 1995 when a person could buy parts and build their own computer for less than a commercial brand. I found learning how to use the Radio Shack Model One Level Two computer was much easier than my experience with the college main frame. The manual that came with the RS computer was more specific more condensed than the 7-inch thick Unix manual at the computer department programming lab on campus. My use of the RS computer was to learn more programming languages while on hiatus from college and to keep paperless financial recorders. I soon learned that going exclusively paperless was not happening anytime soon. This RS computer didn't have an operating system. It used an interpreter with the programming embedded on an EPROM. The first computer I purchase with an actual operating system was the "so-called" toy Commodore 64. I could run CP/M or CBMDOS. This was the first computer that I used a floppy disk drive rather than a cassette player/recorder to load or store programs and run the operating system. I never understood the operating system but learned how to manipulate it to my advantage. The Commodore C-64 came with 64K of RAM. That was a big deal in early 1982 and later. The REU, RAM Expansion Unit was developed making additional memory available for those that could afford the extra expense. The monitor that I purchased with the C-64 could be used as B&W or color. A distinct advantage of the RS-Mod-I-Level-II.

The C-64 was the first personal computer I used that had an operating system. Anyone born after 1980 has no clue how archaic the computer was in its early days/years but it did evolve. My favorite applications were BASIC, FORTRAN, and DBMS where I could program something useful and specific to my need. The early computers were a combination keyboard and the computer as one unit. Although the touch of the keys was similar to the touch of an IBM Selectric Typewriter (for you youngsters this was a mechanical, sometime electrically powered, typing device that used a single sheet of paper that the user advanced on line at a time and arms connected to the keys hammered against the paper. An inked cloth ribbon would raise up between the striking hammer and the paper to produce a printed character on the paper.) the position where the user needed to rest their hands for typing was awkward without an extension the same height as the top of the front of the keyboard. The user had no choice but to adapt to the existing keyboard. When computers began construction with the keyboard as a separate input device connected to the computer by a wire interchangeability of keyboards became possible.

-- Terry Morris

OMG, the way you described the IBM Selectric typewriter makes me feel old. :-)   In high school I was taught how to type on a manual Royal typewriter.  About midway through the semester, the majority of the typewriters were upgraded to the IBM Selectric typewriters.  The little ball ratcheting up, down, and around then striking the ribbon and paper was fascinating to me.
Idea  Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.

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