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What size SSD should I buy?
#11
Choose whatever size ssd you want.
Since these kinds of questions are subjective, only you know the answer, for obvious reasons.

Standard recommendation is 256GB.
The speed bump of NAND vs NOR or large vs small is negligible - you would hardly notice unless you filled the drive to near capacity.

So a standard setup may look like this:
- 256 SSD for OS, some programs, some productivity files...
- 1TB drive (SSD or spinning rust) for storage

A better question would be: "what 'brand' of ssd..." Some companies produce cheap crap so buyer beware.
All Operating Systems suck... but some more than others
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#12
My suggestion was just a way to optimize storage vs cost.  A single large SSD will be more expensive than a smaller SSD and a large HD.  If cost is no object, then sure, a single large drive is less complicated.
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#13
(01-30-2019, 05:49 PM)WA2MZE Wrote: My suggestion was just a way to optimize storage vs cost.  A single large SSD will be more expensive than a smaller SSD and a large HD.  If cost is no object, then sure, a single large drive is less complicated.

As you mentioned yourself in an earlier post,
most laptops only support a single SATA drive.
Nvme is rather new and not as wide spread in low- to mid-range devices.
Therefore most laptops only support one singular permanent storage device.
This means that one would have to get a larger SSD if one wanted to store loads of data.

However, as I mentioned in my earlier post in this thread,
most people have fewer data than they realise,
because most files are smaller than one might suspect.

An example:
I regularly buy CDs and rip them to my laptops drive.
My largest ripped album is about 560 MB, while most are about 250 MB on average.
All albums are ripped to lossless flac files.
A hundred albums at an average size of 250 MB are only about 25 GB,
and you can choose a lossy format like ogg-vorbis or mp3
which would result in a massive size reduction.
In fact, I also buy audio book as CDs and rip them to ogg-vorbis.
One hour of such a file takes up about 45 MB.
So a hundred hours of audio books would only take up about 4.5 GB.
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"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#14
My old thinkpad x220 has both a 2.5" bay and a minipci slot. Was it the first year that Lenovo did this? I know that the x220 is a higher end device.
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#15
(01-31-2019, 01:04 PM)WA2MZE Wrote: My old thinkpad x220 has both a 2.5" bay and a minipci slot.  Was it the first year that Lenovo did this?  I know that the x220 is a higher end device.

Luckily I also have a slot or an nvme drive and one for a sata drive.
However only the nvme slot is populated at the moment.
I tried using a 1 TB hard drive in the sata slot, but I removed it after a few days because
a) I don't need that much space
b) I am so used to SSDs, that the sounds of the mechanical drive annoyed me
c) May laptop uses considerably more power with that drive installed
d) I have a light laptop, so as weird as it sounds, the additional weight annoyed me

I have some smaller sata SSDs lying around on my desk
and I thought about installing one of them, maybe to install other systems for testing...
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"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#16
I use one 256GB SSD per OS I use and a 1TB SSD for my $HOME. All other long-term storage are on spinning rust. The splitting of this is quite obvious and if you have the cash you should go down this route IMHO.

Another thing is that the larger the SSD is the better the longevity (normally) is. Food for thought.
- @damianrath   //    "With age comes wisdom & with experience comes understanding."
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#17
(11-24-2018, 10:24 AM)Dexter Hovis Wrote: If this is a total newbie question I'm sorry but ...

I'm about to buy a new computer and will initially be using it to run Ubuntu 18.04. In future I may well, of course, change the operating system to another version of Linux. The operating system will be on an SSD and the home directory will be on a separate HDD.

There is a choice of sizes for the SSD ranging from 120GB to 1TB. If I was buying a Windows machine I'd probably put the operating system on a 256GB or 512GB SSD in order to provide plenty of room for the operating system to grow as I added additional programmes. Is this necessary for a Linux machine? Is there any benefit to buying any SSD larger than 120GB?

I'd appreciate any advice that you can give me.

Dont know if u can still get SSD that small,but I have had great results using 240gb SSDs with spinning data drives as big as you want in several machines.You can even do that in a cheap old laptop if you throw away the dvd and get an adaptor to put in its place.Most if not all Linux distros take up much less HD space than Windows.You can usually find out on the distros home page  what the minimum HD requirement is.
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#18
If its a lap top i go with a 250g but a Desk distro i would just go with a 120 g as for now i don't like the idea of a short lifespan expected on some of these SSD's, but i usually keep several lying around for testing different Distros, i have 5 laptops and regularly switch out the SSD's in two of them. i have a lot of junk but have never filled a 120 full, lmho
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