Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Duo Boot Ubuntu and Kali Linux
#1
Hello everyone, I am glad to be here.

Is it a good idea to run Ubuntu 18.04LTS for a daily desktop type of using while having the chance to practice with Kali Linux in duo boot.

I guess, the short answer is yes, why not! 
But what worries me is my beginner level on Linux in general. I am afraid of start learning Kali and If I am messing up with the system on a daily basis, my Ubuntu environment might become vulnerable too. 

Can someone please advice, how can I install and run both in a safe and secure manner?
I would be also happy if I am just referred to a decent topic, as I had try to look around the internet and didn't get anything clear enough. 

Regards, 
Break Root
Reply
#2
(11-15-2018, 09:02 PM)brkroot Wrote: Hello everyone, I am glad to be here.

Is it a good idea to run Ubuntu 18.04LTS for a daily desktop type of using while having the chance to practice with Kali Linux in duo boot.

I guess, the short answer is yes, why not! 
But what worries me is my beginner level on Linux in general. I am afraid of start learning Kali and If I am messing up with the system on a daily basis, my Ubuntu environment might become vulnerable too. 

Can someone please advice, how can I install and run both in a safe and secure manner?
I would be also happy if I am just referred to a decent topic, as I had try to look around the internet and didn't get anything clear enough. 

Regards, 
Break Root


I am sure opinions will vary about how to do this, because one of the beauties of Linux is the flexibility.  For a new person to Linux I would suggest using the most easy and user friendly graphic user interface (gui) method.   First, I would install the Ubuntu 18.04 or your daily choice.  If you want to evaluate another Linux distribution (distro) you can use the VirtualBox application to setup a virtual machine.  The virtual machine using virtual storage will isolate the evaluation distro from your daily Linux installation.  The VirtualBox application is probably the most friendly virtualization solution for new users.  I am sure somebody trying to tell the world how much they know and suggest you use a container with systemd-nspawn.  They do not understand the context of the new user already being overwhelmed with the new experience, and the k.i.s.s. method is a much better solution.  For a new user it is best to stay with the gui applications.  As your experience level grows you will become curious and eventually start using the terminal.  Unless you are a casual user or using the Linux computer as a productivity tool to get a job done, you may never need anything other than a gui application.   
 
The Virtualbox web site has an extensive user manual, and you may want to get a copy to study.  Also, I would encourage you to check out Joe Collins' EzeeLinux youtube channel for an introduction and other VirtualBox videos.  


Reference:

VirtualBox 
https://www.virtualbox.org

Joe Collins' EzeeLinux youtube channel has a few videos on the subject.  Check out the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/user/BadEditPro/...virtualbox
Reply
#3
Another advantage with using vbox is if you mess up you just tell it to delete the vmachine and start over no muss no fuss plus you can try out more than just kali.
But keep in mimd to make sure if you are going to change to a real machine try it with a live cd first because vbox will let you get used to it but NOT make sure the distro runs correctly on your real hardware.
Reply
#4
Well this is it! Thank you guys for pointing out. I have missed those videos on the EzeeLinux YouTube channel (although I have watched a lot other Joe Collins's videos).

I understand that one of the most important things in my case is about the Network option and that I must  attach to bridged adaptor, since I am going to mess around with networking, protocols and ports etc.

Unfortunately it seems like my machine wont be performing very well, since it is just the shameful Intel® Core™ i3-2330M CPU @ 2.20GHz × 4 .
Regardless, I will give the installation a try. It seems like it is with  difficulty 4 out of 10 for my beginner level so I guess I will be fine.

By the way I would like just to express that, Ezee Linux and particularly Joe Collins is the reason I've become very, very  excited about Linux. I have been watching tons of YouTube channels about it and I can say that Joe Collins is by far the best out there.
His straightforward and clear talking, pointing out very neatly his opinions and believes here and there throughout the videos, and most of all his passion  about Linux is just making me ridiculously happy that there is such people out there.  BIG THUMBS UP MAN!!!!

Also a big appreciation  to all people involved in Ezee Linux and this super neat forum. I will be adding it and sharing it on all my online profiles and I hope that it will bring more people so I and everyone else could benefit of the learning and sharing knowledge about Linux.

The Linux community seems to be one of the greatest communities nowadays. I should have had start using it 10 years ago.

brk root
Reply
#5
(11-15-2018, 09:02 PM)brkroot Wrote: Hello everyone, I am glad to be here.

Is it a good idea to run Ubuntu 18.04LTS for a daily desktop type of using while having the chance to practice with Kali Linux in duo boot.

I guess, the short answer is yes, why not! 
But what worries me is my beginner level on Linux in general. I am afraid of start learning Kali and If I am messing up with the system on a daily basis, my Ubuntu environment might become vulnerable too. 

Can someone please advice, how can I install and run both in a safe and secure manner?
I would be also happy if I am just referred to a decent topic, as I had try to look around the internet and didn't get anything clear enough. 

Regards, 
Break Root

Technically, Kali Linux is not meant to be installed,
it is supposed to be a live only distribution.

This does of course not mean that you can not install it,
but I agree with what has already been said: Use it in a virtual machine.

I guess you want to do the typical things and play around with WiFi sniffing
and MITM attacks.
To do these effectively, you don't just need to have an internet connection for your VM,
you need full controll over the WiFi chipset.
This can however easiely be achieved with most virtualisation software,
the same way you would connect a USB device to a VM.


Here is a warning: Do not use Kali Linux as your main operating system.
Kali is designed for pen-testing; To make that easier, several safety features
normaly found in linux distriutions have been turned of.
Kali is also designed as a single-user distribution, where you are always root,
which is also quite unsafe for anything permanent.
So yes, Kali is in fact less secure than most distributions.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
Reply
#6
Please correct me if I get it wrong.
And please excuse my incompetence in the next few thoughts.

1. With Live USB, I use the whole of the system resources, except for the HDD read/write.
With a VM, I can't use all the resources, because part of them are being used to run the parent system. So that means If i get a good USB pen drive and use Kali Live, the performance would be better then if its on a VM (since the VB uses more then half of processor and ram already)

2. If I go for Live USB with persistence, then there will be some lack of security. There is no log in or security mechanism.
But since it is just a live version and is not installed, then there's absolutely no way my HDD and/or the Ubuntu system become vulnerable, but only what is stored on the USB drive. Which is alright, I wont share anything in that Kali Live environment, will be just exploring the tools and might be downloading some articles on it's drive.

3. One of the disadvantages of choosing the USB is that I wont have automatic or even not at all, updates for the Kali which is a bit of unsafe, isn't it?

4. Another disadvantage is that I will be facing more bugs and crashes with the USB Live, is that actually true?

5. And lastly something I am just thinking about is whatever option I chose, I will have to take precarious steps to tighten up my network, as If I get attacks while using Kali with USB and my router firewall get cracked, then when I am using the local Ubuntu, there might have some risks?
I've no idea how I got to that conclusion, please comment and criticize on that.  

Thank you for mentioning that Kali Linux is meant to be for mostly testing and better choice is having it on a USB, in terms of mobility.
Also I agree too, that using Kali as a main OS is a big no no, especially for beginners. No matter how many topics and bloggers out there are stating that Kali is super secure - It  just doesn't make sense to me. So it will be either VM or USB - thank you guys for clearing that for me.

And so, I guess I am going for having Kali Linux on a USB as for starting with it, and one day might use it on a virtual box.
Because is more safe and secure, right?
Reply
#7
In your original post you stated:

But what worries me is my beginner level on Linux in general. I am afraid of start learning Kali and If I am messing up with the system on a daily basis, my Ubuntu environment might become vulnerable too.

To isolated your Ubuntu installation on your hdd/ssd from another distribution you can accomplish this with virtualization assuming you are only using virtual storage.   

If you boot a live distro you are not isolating your Ubuntu daily installation or user data.  As a new user you need to be very careful.   Since you stated you were a beginner level I did not mention using physical isolation, and if you are not computer hardware savvy I would not suggest it.  Physical isolation would be removing the physical hdd/ssd(s) and replacing them with a different hdd/ssd(s).  In this manner you can run physical without risking your Ubuntu installation or user data.  

Sorry, I was negligent by not mentioning backup and bare metal restoration in my first reply.   
No matter which you choose always invest some time and study the different Linux backup tools.  Once you decide on the backup tool(s) to use I would encourage to study and test your backup/restoration strategy.  You should have fully tested and documented a real bare metal restoration of your computer.  At least three external drives for daily, weekly and monthly backups should be part of your backup rotation, and you should consider keeping at a minimum the monthly off site.  I know I am rambling, and I will shut-up now.
Reply
#8
(11-16-2018, 09:04 PM)deck_luck Wrote: In your original post you stated:

But what worries me is my beginner level on Linux in general. I am afraid of start learning Kali and If I am messing up with the system on a daily basis, my Ubuntu environment might become vulnerable too.

To isolated your Ubuntu installation on your hdd/ssd from another distribution you can accomplish this with virtualization assuming you  are only using virtual storage.   

If you boot a live distro you are not isolating your Ubuntu daily installation or user data.  As a new user you need to be very careful.   Since you stated you were a beginner level I did not mention using physical isolation, and if you are not computer hardware savvy I would not suggest it.  Physical isolation would be removing the physical hdd/ssd(s) and replacing them with a different hdd/ssd(s).  In this manner you can run physical without risking your Ubuntu installation or user data.  

Sorry, I was negligent by not mentioning backup and bare metal restoration in my first reply.   
No matter which you choose always invest some time and study the different Linux backup tools.  Once you decide on the backup tool(s) to use I would encourage to study and test your backup/restoration strategy.  You should have fully tested and documented a real bare metal restoration of your computer.  At least three external drives for daily, weekly and monthly backups should be part of your backup rotation, and you should consider keeping at a minimum the monthly off site.  I know I am rambling, and I will shut-up now.

You are very right, thank you for mentioning about the importance of backups.

I am very happy now to be able to explore more distros in isolated environment. Thank you all for clear the things for me. 

I have successfully installed VB and ran Kali, and the only thing I've not followed from the most tutorials was about the network type. Instead of bridged adaptor I used the NAT way as it will mask the network activity. With the bridge adaptor the VM will be on the same network as the host.  
Actually, the other thing I decided to choose instead, is the fixed over dynamic disk size. I guess with the dynamic size it will affect the overall performance and things might go a bit slower. 

I will have to replace Ubuntu with Lubuntu, as I am having a shortage of memory. Ubuntu 18.04 is very heavy and it takes 1.3Gb of ram on idling. It has been heavy with 16.04 LTS too, so I guess it could also be because the old machine. Sony Vaio vpech, i3 x4 @ 2.2Ghz with 3.8 GB ram.

I allocated 2Gb of memory to the VB and Kali, and have left 1.8Gb for the Ubuntu. That way it was fine, but still can't use Firefox or Chromium on Kali if I have to quickly check up something. But that's okay as I started browsing from the terminal with w3m.

thanks a lot
Reply
#9
(11-19-2018, 07:21 PM)brkroot Wrote:
(11-16-2018, 09:04 PM)deck_luck Wrote: In your original post you stated:

But what worries me is my beginner level on Linux in general. I am afraid of start learning Kali and If I am messing up with the system on a daily basis, my Ubuntu environment might become vulnerable too.

To isolated your Ubuntu installation on your hdd/ssd from another distribution you can accomplish this with virtualization assuming you  are only using virtual storage.   

If you boot a live distro you are not isolating your Ubuntu daily installation or user data.  As a new user you need to be very careful.   Since you stated you were a beginner level I did not mention using physical isolation, and if you are not computer hardware savvy I would not suggest it.  Physical isolation would be removing the physical hdd/ssd(s) and replacing them with a different hdd/ssd(s).  In this manner you can run physical without risking your Ubuntu installation or user data.  

Sorry, I was negligent by not mentioning backup and bare metal restoration in my first reply.   
No matter which you choose always invest some time and study the different Linux backup tools.  Once you decide on the backup tool(s) to use I would encourage to study and test your backup/restoration strategy.  You should have fully tested and documented a real bare metal restoration of your computer.  At least three external drives for daily, weekly and monthly backups should be part of your backup rotation, and you should consider keeping at a minimum the monthly off site.  I know I am rambling, and I will shut-up now.

You are very right, thank you for mentioning about the importance of backups.

I am very happy now to be able to explore more distros in isolated environment. Thank you all for clear the things for me. 

I have successfully installed VB and ran Kali, and the only thing I've not followed from the most tutorials was about the network type. Instead of bridged adaptor I used the NAT way as it will mask the network activity. With the bridge adaptor the VM will be on the same network as the host.  
Actually, the other thing I decided to choose instead, is the fixed over dynamic disk size. I guess with the dynamic size it will affect the overall performance and things might go a bit slower. 

I will have to replace Ubuntu with Lubuntu, as I am having a shortage of memory. Ubuntu 18.04 is very heavy and it takes 1.3Gb of ram on idling. It has been heavy with 16.04 LTS too, so I guess it could also be because the old machine. Sony Vaio vpech, i3 x4 @ 2.2Ghz with 3.8 GB ram.

I allocated 2Gb of memory to the VB and Kali, and have left 1.8Gb for the Ubuntu. That way it was fine, but still can't use Firefox or Chromium on Kali if I have to quickly check up something. But that's okay as I started browsing from the terminal with w3m.

thanks a lot

You might try evaluating XFCE desktop environment distributions for your daily computer.     It is a light middle weight desktop environment, but it looks a lot better than Lubuntu.   Linux Mint has a well polish and attractive XFCE DE.   Since you have Virtual Box installed you can use VMs to evaluate many different variant to find the one just right for you.  Also MATE is a very similar variant to XFCE.  I would use either.  Both are much lighter that Ubuntu 18.04 default Gnome3 desk top environment.
Reply
#10
One other thing you should never have more than half your memory assigned to your vbox.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)