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looking to change from windows to linux
#11
I would even suggest trying Ubuntu on a virtual machine, or LIVE USB. 

I Personally found that Ubuntu is the ultimate way for transition from Windows to Linux. 
Its just very beautiful and ready out of the box system, that definitely grabs the interest and put new users in ease of using it. 

Everything in Linux works in complete order. Everything makes sense and it is much easier to fix problems. 
And most of all, if you have a question you will find it in zero time. 
Try searching something related to Windows - good luck extracting the info you need from the sheer stupidity out there. You will be constantly roaming from a link to link, and downloading all sorts of doggy software from very weird websites .. and your system will be always in trouble and risk.


Linux is free as freedom, where Windows isn't free, as being locked in a prison cell.
  • But you wont be able to play games as on Windows (even with wine - there is always problems, and you must be advanced Linux user to be able to maintain the environments in order).
  • Also there isn't much of a great graphical software on Linux. 

Other than these two things, everything on Linux is much much better than windows, once you get use to it. 

Almost an year Linux user and fan now, and couldn't be more happy Wink
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#12
The only problem with Ubuntu is that the Gnome desktop will bamboozle the newbe coming from Windoze.  I'd therefore recommend one of the following:  Linux Mint (Cinnamon, MATE, or XFCE), Kubuntu,  Ubuntu-MATE, or Xubuntu .... probably in that order.

IF you are willing to take the time to learn the new workflow on Gnome3, Ubuntu will serve you well.  It's not that Gnome3 is bad, but everything is in a different place than you are used to.  What's nice about it is that you can actually do almost everything (on the desktop) from your keyboard without lifting you dominant hand to grab your mouse.  But ... you have to learn all those keyboard shortcuts.  The mouse still works though.
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#13
(01-25-2019, 09:51 AM)Jondoe Wrote: I suggest buy another hard drive .

Just remove your windows hard drive , plop in a new one and boot linux from dvd iso or usb iso. Install linux.
That way anytime you panic and feel you need to jump back on windows , plop in your windows hard drive and you are back to windows.

Eventually I think you will stop switching  and  with enough seat time you will be staying with linux. If not , then linux is not for you.

I was wondering the same thing since Joe says not to dual boot in his video Linux Talk | The Dual Boot Deception on YouTube. I would think that a person would be able to just add another drive and install Linux on it to keep the boot loaders separated so they don't destroy your drive. I signed up here because of that video and I'm still surfing around looking for info that will help taking the first steps onto Linux. I guess doing the 2 hard drives is still valid?? Nothing has changed in the last few months since you posted this??

Thanks Smile
Home built tower pc several years old, MB Micro-Star MS-7519 v2.0 American Megatrends Bios, Intel Core2 Quad Q9550 2.8Ghz, ATI Radeon HD 5770 [AMD Juniper XT], 3 monitors-- a 32" LG Led 1920x1080, a 22" Asus IPS LED 1920x1080, and a Sony 32" TV LED 1280x720, Creative USB Digital Audio.
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#14
I'm a raw newbie when it comes to Linux (more like a wanna be at this point) so I may be full of something nasty here but I have heard of people getting around dual boot issues by installing a hot swap bay in their computer, then installing multiple OSes on multiple drives, one OS per drive. To change the current OS, one would shut down the computer (if it wasn't already), yank the current OS drive from the swap bay, plug in the drive with the desired OS, then reboot. I would think that would eliminate the pitfalls of dual booting, albeit inelegantly (then, again, maybe not).
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#15
(03-26-2019, 02:14 AM)robertcs68 Wrote: I was wondering the same thing since Joe says not to dual boot in his video Linux Talk | The Dual Boot Deception on YouTube. I would think that a person would be able to just add another drive and install Linux on it to keep the boot loaders separated so they don't destroy your drive. I signed up here because of that video and I'm still surfing around looking for info that will help taking the first steps onto Linux. I guess doing the 2 hard drives is still valid?? Nothing has changed in the last few months since you posted this??

Thanks Smile

I avoided any dual boot problems with a dual drive: Windows 7 on one drive, Mint on the other. I take the additional precaution of never letting Windows connect to the internet.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#16
Arch Linux is best Linux!
JK, you're probably best served with Mint Cinnamon for a first run at it. I still run Mint as my primary system because it's just rock solid.
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#17
(03-26-2019, 03:31 PM)cliffcoggin Wrote:
(03-26-2019, 02:14 AM)robertcs68 Wrote: I was wondering the same thing since Joe says not to dual boot in his video Linux Talk | The Dual Boot Deception on YouTube. I would think that a person would be able to just add another drive and install Linux on it to keep the boot loaders separated so they don't destroy your drive. I signed up here because of that video and I'm still surfing around looking for info that will help taking the first steps onto Linux. I guess doing the 2 hard drives is still valid?? Nothing has changed in the last few months since you posted this??

Thanks Smile

I avoided any dual boot problems with a dual drive: Windows 7 on one drive, Mint on the other. I take the additional precaution of never letting Windows connect to the internet.

New SSD and thumb drive should be here Friday. I'll be giving MX Linux 18.1 a try over the weekend.
Home built tower pc several years old, MB Micro-Star MS-7519 v2.0 American Megatrends Bios, Intel Core2 Quad Q9550 2.8Ghz, ATI Radeon HD 5770 [AMD Juniper XT], 3 monitors-- a 32" LG Led 1920x1080, a 22" Asus IPS LED 1920x1080, and a Sony 32" TV LED 1280x720, Creative USB Digital Audio.
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#18
I have been using the method suggested by Lady Fitzgerald for over year now and this my preferred method by far! The ONLY reason I boot into Windows is the hang out with some friends in an online game. I boot from my Windows SSD and play and chat with them. For everything else I use Linux and while it's a little inconvenient to power down, swap, and power on every time I switch it has proven to be very reliable and safe. I even have SSDs with other Linux distros that I like and wanted to try on hardware after playing with them in Virtualbox. This way I can play to my hearts content and not worry about messing up my daily driver.

JT
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#19
I gave up on Windows in 2001 after putting up with Win98 for 3 years. I moved to the then new iMac(looked like a half ball with a 15" screen attached) and it ran great for 11 years until a lighting strike came through the dsl line and fried the mother board. Moved to a Win8 laptop for exactly one week and after it picked up a Trojan virus that borked the system returned it and used the funds to buy a couple used laptops. Did and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS install on both and thus began my Linux Journey. Did quite a bit of Distro Hopping trying out things to see what I actually liked. Now after 7 years I'm on Kubuntu because KDE Plasma 5 has really improved over the last couple years and Ubuntu gives me all the packages I want/need and it's rock solid stable too. I've found that there's something to do just about anything I'd care to do on my Linux Box if you just look around for a solution. I think it's a good move to go to a Linux based OS over Windows, especially with the way Win10 spies on you and has all that bloat ware installed on it.
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#20
If you're morally opposed to Windows for whatever reason or you just like the challenge of an open-source OS, you can have a good experience with Linux. But if you just want to work or play, Windows is still a lot easier to use, has much more attractive UI and offers a much broader range of software.
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