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looking to change from windows to linux
#1
i have been looking to make a change from windows to linux with company's constantly intruding systems ive been looking at something different i have an alienware system and are looking for something different does anyone have any advice. i did buy a second system to learn my way around linuix it is a xps m1210 i have read on many different versions of linux but since this is new to me many things are confusing.
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#2
Well the first thing we need to ask is how/what do you use your computer for?
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#3
I made the change from Windows to Linux just 15 months ago so I sympathise with your bewilderment at the choices available. Research will soon show you that some distributions are more suited to newcomers than others. (Personally I chose Mint Cinnamon for ease of installation, stability, and ease of use, but you must make your own mind up as there are several that would suit.) Beware the dogmatic opinions of some who will claim their distribution is the "best", whatever that means.

I suggest you download a few different distros onto USB sticks and actually test them on your computer. As long as you can set your BIOS to start from USB you can test each one on your computer without actually installing it to check that hardware such as keyboard, monitor, printer, wifi etc. will work, and that your computer's resources are suitable. Experiment with applications to get a feel for the way things are done in Linux, though note that you can not generally save any changes to what is called a "live disc".

Only once you have found a distro you like should you install it from that same USB stick. Even if you later come to dislike that distro it can be changed to another relatively easily, so nothing is irrevocable.

There are many videos on Youtube which will help your research. Many are incomprehensible because of blurred pictures, garbled speech, or overly technical explanations. Others, like Joe Collins's, are much more helpful in making a choice and showing how to do many of the things I mentioned above.
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#4
Hi b0rg6
Welcome to Ezeetalk!

Likely the most commonly asked question in all the forums I'm on or not on. There is no absolute answer to your question but there are a few things to consider, we'll go over some briefly.

- inspect your hardware to make sure you don't have some obscure or poorly supported hardware drivers - not as common these days but still worth looking into. (Nvidia Prime and Broadcom come to mind)

- Like spudnuts said: what are you using the machine for? Home use, business, development, pen testing...

- the most popular distro may not be the best fit for everyone but it's popularity does count for something. So when you're searching, don't discount the popularity factor.

Additionally, I find two different types of potential users that stroll into my shop:

Type 1 - the young 20 something or younger user that primarily lives on their smart phone device. These types of users flock to my Ubuntu 18.04 Gnome desktop machines and within a very short time are using the system with ease. It has a familiar interface that closely resembles their smart phones.

Type 2 - the older 40 plus crowd that have gone from Win XP to Win7 or to Win10. They feel more at home on the Mint Xfce and Ubuntu Mate machines I have set up. The 'start menu' style and desktop icon design really convinces them to use Linux. The only drawback is they complain they cannot install their favorite Win programs - that's the caveat of look-a-like systems.

You're right in the confusing nature of selecting a distro as there are hundreds of them to choose from. A good starting point to begin your research would be to visit this link and read and read and read:

https://distrowatch.com/

Have fun! and come back to let us know what you decided on Smile
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#5
Hello b0rg6.

The Dell machine you got for testing Linux out is pretty old hardware and for that you would need a fairly light weight version of Linux. The basics are essentially this: Linux is available in different Desktop Environments (DE). Xfce and MATE are 'light' DEs. They use less memory from the machine to do all the things Linux needs to do. Cinnamon and GNOME are two DEs that require more memory because they do things with more flair and have more of that 'WOW' factor that the kids like from their computers. The difference is akin to the different cars you can buy. Xfce and MATE are like the Ford Tarus. It's basic and reliable. Cinnamon and GNOME are like Lincoln town cars, more luxury.

This is different from Windows because with Windows you get what Microsoft gives you for a Desktop environment. The same with Apple and their operating system.

After that we have different Distributions (distros) based on a parent distribution. Like Chevy and Buick are from General Motors. Debian and Arch Linux are two of the more popular parent companies. Some distros are considered more user friendly because the people that distribute them do more of the hard work for you so that you don't have to worry with the details. Linux Mint and Ubuntu are based off of Debian and are considered user friendly while Debian is more for the advanced user. Manjaro is based off of Arch and is considered more user friendly than Arch. Generally, Debian is considered more newbie friendly just because it tends to be more stable. It is also slower to update to newer software because of this.

In your situation I would download live ISO of a lite distribution of Debian and burn the ISO file to a dvd blank. Then you can boot from this from your laptop and make sure everything works on it. While it may be slow you need to keep in mind that it is running from a DVD and not from your hard drive because you are just testing it until you decide to install it. It will run faster from the hard drive.

I hope this helps and doesn't confuse you more than it helps.
JT
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#6
(10-06-2018, 08:22 PM)spudnuts Wrote: Well the first thing we need to ask is how/what do you use your computer for?

im putting it on a dell xps m1210 it can  only support 32 bit

(10-13-2018, 04:27 AM)Victarr Wrote: Hello b0rg6.

The Dell machine you got for testing Linux out is pretty old hardware and for that you would need a fairly light weight version of Linux. The basics are essentially this: Linux is available in different Desktop Environments (DE). Xfce and MATE are 'light' DEs. They use less memory from the machine to do all the things Linux needs to do. Cinnamon and GNOME are two DEs that require more memory because they do things with more flair and have more of that 'WOW' factor that the kids like from their computers. The difference is akin to the different cars you can buy. Xfce and MATE are like the Ford Tarus. It's basic and reliable. Cinnamon and GNOME are like Lincoln town cars, more luxury.

This is different from Windows because with Windows you get what Microsoft gives you for a Desktop environment. The same with Apple and their operating system.

After that we have different Distributions (distros) based on a parent distribution. Like Chevy and Buick are from General Motors. Debian and Arch Linux are two of the more popular parent companies. Some distros are considered more user friendly because the people that distribute them do more of the hard work for you so that you don't have to worry with the details. Linux Mint and Ubuntu are based off of Debian and are considered user friendly while Debian is more for the advanced user. Manjaro is based off of Arch and is considered more user friendly than Arch. Generally, Debian is considered more newbie friendly just because it tends to be more stable. It is also slower to update to newer software because of this.

In your situation I would download live ISO of a lite distribution of Debian and burn the ISO file to a dvd blank. Then you can boot from this from your laptop and make sure everything works on it. While it may be slow you need to keep in mind that it is running from a DVD and not from your hard drive because you are just testing it until you decide to install it. It will run faster from the hard drive.

I hope this helps and doesn't confuse you more than it helps.
JT

i was going to dual boot it on my ailenware m14 but everything ive read suggest against that for new users also with the  ailenware thier is some issues with drivers for the wifi and internet
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#7
Ok what I am seeing is you just want to play with it for now.

My suggestion is start with mint 18.3 mate, yes I know there are faster distros but this is just for play at this time and you will be amazed how usable even the slow distros are on older hardware compared to windows.
After you get comfortable with mint you can try some other versions/distros of linux on the same box and that will give you an idea of what you would like to change to when you are ready to do the big switch as it were.
I find it easier to judge the speed of a distro on older hardware because you don't need any software to feel the difference in speed, while your new box will not notice the difference most of the time it will when you have the system loaded down once in a while so if you do stuff that is speed oriented that window of heavy load will be much smaller.
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#8
Tom Murosky site has lot of Linux info too
here's a video about disto's etc.
https://youtu.be/fCkeXBfy554
a better one explains Win and Linux differences:
https://youtu.be/p4xA7GRmf6o
--rick--
Dos 3.2 to Win 10.
Main - Cinnamon 19.3 , alts Arch ,Manjaro
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   Resistance Is Not Futile!
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#9
I had some idea of Ubuntu because at that period of time, Ubuntu was being popularized by BdOSN (Bangladesh Open Source Network) and they were giving away Ubuntu bootable CDs in various events like olympiads or science exhibitions. I received one CD containing Ubuntu 9.04 in some olympiad as a prize. I had no idea what to do with the CD. Tutuapp 9apps Showbox
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#10
I suggest buy another hard drive .

Just remove your windows hard drive , plop in a new one and boot linux from dvd iso or usb iso. Install linux.
That way anytime you panic and feel you need to jump back on windows , plop in your windows hard drive and you are back to windows.

Eventually I think you will stop switching and with enough seat time you will be staying with linux. If not , then linux is not for you.
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