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FreeBsd?
#1
Just looking for thoughts about FreeBSD.  I might give it a go on my next refurber laptop.  Any things to look out for? Thanks for any info.

DahRat
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#2
(10-06-2018, 05:13 AM)DahRat Wrote: Just looking for thoughts about FreeBSD.  I might give it a go on my next refurber laptop.  Any things to look out for? Thanks for any info.

DahRat

Always try it on VirtualBox or other virtualization solution first.

You might want to get Absolute FreeBSD by Michael W. Lucas. I got the newest edition of Absolute OpenBSD and it a pretty good supplement to the official documentation.

Having said that, I've only tried installing OpenBSD and FreeBSD in VirtualBox, and I was less impressed with the latter than the former. When I installed the MATE desktop on both OS'es via the ports, OpenBSD just worked with a few instructions, while FreeBSD need extra steps that, for whatever reason, did not automatically work. The community felt very unfriendly and unhelpful as well.

TrueOS might be another option, although I find the lumina desktop to be pretty bad. GhostBSD seems to be okay. Maybe start there?

Having said that, I've never tried any of this on real hardware.
Currently running: NixOS on a desktop (not for newbies!) and Ubuntu MATE on a laptop.
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#3
(10-06-2018, 05:13 AM)DahRat Wrote: Just looking for thoughts about FreeBSD.  I might give it a go on my next refurber laptop.  Any things to look out for? Thanks for any info.

DahRat

The BSDs hardware support will be not as good as what you know from Linux,
so I can't imagine you will get things like WiFi or similar "obscure" stuff.
They are also quite different from Linux in a few ways:
Although they are also unixoid (true unix actually) and also POSIX complient,
they work differently behind the scenes, so don't expect everything that runs on Linux to run on *BSD.
Also their commuinites are smaller, which means there is overall less software available.

Most of the BSD stay closer to the original unix philosophies than the major Linux distributions,
which means they try to avoid unneeded bloat and functionality.

All in all you have to expect to get your hands dirty and do some manual command line work.
But if you can successfully install it on a machine and all your software works, you will have a great time.
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#4
as said above FreeBSD is different.
dual boot is possible, but don't expect success on the first attempt.

I recommend starting with an empty drive without other drives physically connected.
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#5
Thats what I've been seeing on YT vids. I like the idea that it seems to be a tighter build. From what I've seen it has a more logical file structure? I don't mind trying my hand at installing it on fresh machine. I've even thought about trying to install it on my '03 Imac G4. Anyhow, thanks for the info, food for thought once I get my next machine.

DahRat
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