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Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.10?
#1
I am a new Linux user, and I have Ubuntu 18.04. I'm wondering if I should upgrade to Ubuntu 18.10 (which will probably release soon). Or is it safer to stay on the LTS version? And what updates will it include?
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#2
Hi
Welcome to EzeeTalk

There's no right or wrong answer to your question. it's totally up to you if you want to try out a point version. That said there are a few things you should know.
- point releases are not long term supported and could contain bugs that are not yet fixed or known but also may contain some new features to be tested for future releases.
- always back up your data before making any bare metal changes
- try it in live mode or virtual machine first, that way you won't do permanent damage to your system
- visit Ubuntu website and have a look at the release notes, it's a good source of info.

Whatever you decide, it's totally up to you

Have fun!
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#3
(09-30-2018, 12:24 PM)kosemMG Wrote: I am a new Linux user, and I have Ubuntu 18.04. I'm wondering if I should upgrade to Ubuntu 18.10 (which will probably release soon). Or is it safer to stay on the LTS version? And what updates will it include?

If safety or stability is what is most important to you then stay with your current OS. There is no point in changing unless you find 18.04 deficient in some way, or there is a particular feature of 18.10 you want that is not present in 18.04. However if you decide to change, back up all your data and your 18.04 OS first so that you can revert if things go awry.
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#4
Thank you for your answers.
However, everybody recommends to backup my data before changing to the new version. Why is that? Why things may go awry? It's not a beta version...
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#5
You should make a backup because there is no absolute guarantee that the upgrade will be successful. It's a routine precaution that applies to any operating system and any computer, in fact even if you decide not to upgrade you should still backup your data on a regular basis. Unfortunately most people only learn this lesson the hard way.
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#6
I avoid the Ubuntu interim releases. They tend to be test beds for new features and usually have some bugs. Unless you really have a super good reason to run one, stick with the LTS. Smile
-- Your Fearless Leader!

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#7
If you have only one computer then I would advise no.  If you have multiple computers then it is your call.

Still, as others have said, non LTS releases are test beds for new features and ideas.  In general it is best to stay on a LTS unless you have hardware that isn't working and a newer kernel not in the LTS might help.

Obviously the final call is yours.  You must decide what is right for your situation.  Still even as an experienced Linux admin I don't upgrade core systems to non LTS releases.  No thanks.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#8
(10-02-2018, 09:27 PM)cleverwise Wrote: Still, as others have said, non LTS releases are test beds for new features and ideas.  In general it is best to stay on a LTS unless you have hardware that isn't working and a newer kernel not in the LTS might help.

This is why I use the kernel update utility that was made for Ubuntu. I needed a newer kernel for my video card's drivers that 18.04 didn't have. I downloaded the utility, and updated my kernel to a newer kernel. It works perfectly fine to do that. I've had no problems. Although when you do that, you should update all your PPA's and update apt.
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#9
(10-02-2018, 09:27 PM)cleverwise Wrote: If you have only one computer then I would advise no.  If you have multiple computers then it is your call.

Still, as others have said, non LTS releases are test beds for new features and ideas.  In general it is best to stay on a LTS unless you have hardware that isn't working and a newer kernel not in the LTS might help.

Obviously the final call is yours.  You must decide what is right for your situation.  Still even as an experienced Linux admin I don't upgrade core systems to non LTS releases.  No thanks.

The kernel of 18.04 does not have a driver for my Wi-Fi adapter (Realtek Semiconductor RTL8821CE 802.11ac) and I had to compile and install that by myself. Don't know if the 18.10 has it built-in.

Funny, but experienced Linux users (whom I've asked) prefer to stick to LTS and newbies (like me) like to upgrade to interim releases. Something to think about...  Rolleyes

How should I back up in a correct way? Just compress my home folder and save it to an external storage? Every week/month?
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#10
The kernel of 18.04 does not have a driver for my Wi-Fi adapter (Realtek Semiconductor RTL8821CE 802.11ac) and I had to compile and install that by myself. Don't know if the 18.10 has it built-in.

That can happen.

Funny, but experienced Linux users (whom I've asked) prefer to stick to LTS and newbies (like me) like to upgrade to interim releases. Something to think about...

There are many reasons for this and it, of course, varies by the person.  Still a LTS is supported for five years which means updates for five years.  However a non LTS is supported for nine months.  This means you'll be forced to upgrade like it or not if you want to get updates and you do want updates especially security ones.

If you have the time and want to perform upgrades there is nothing wrong with the non LTS versions.  We do need people to use and test them.  So it isn't like one is committing some kind of violation.  For me I need my workstations and PCs to work and don't have time to keep upgrading every nine months.  Yes Linux is much easier than Windows but still I have a lot of things to do and spending time reloading workstations constantly isn't on my list.

How should I back up in a correct way? Just compress my home folder and save it to an external storage? Every week/month?

It really comes down to your comfort level and setup.  What kind of data do you generate? How important is it to you?

Do you want to backup your user data only or also the system?

If you are comfortable with the command line (it sounds like you are) then you may use a program like XBT or CYA as both backup your user data.  However XBT is an easier solution out of the box because it will backup your complete home directory to an external backup.  CYA allows for user data (v2.0+) but is more hands on and configurable.

To backup the system itself there is CYA along with GUI tools like Timeshift.

As to how often that again depends on your comfort level.  Would you be okay if you lost data from a month ago? A week ago? A day ago?  That is something only you can answer for yourself.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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