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My Linux Journey
#1
My Linux Journey

I'm a dinosaur.  I can honestly say that I've forgotten more than many here know. That isn't a brag, but rather a confession, because what I've forgotten is no longer useful.  My journey began in the late '60s with a 2 week class at IBM on 360 assembler for work on one of the first mainframes delivered to Houston. Computer Science did not exist as a college course. My first PC was a HeathKit All-in-One that I built on my kitchen table: 48k main memory, 128K floppy. My first OS was PIP, a precursor to DOS. My second language was a C compiler that I copied from  "Dr. Dobb's Journal of Computer Calisthenics & Orthodontia--Running Light Without Overbyte". I thought it was a High Level Language and loved it. I watched Intel progress through 8080, 186, 286, 386, 486, 586(Pentium), etc. etc. I used 8080 assembler, C, PL1, COBOL, Pascal, and several others. But my all time favorite was Smalltalk. I still think that it is the most beautiful and elegant language ever designed.  I learned Linux from a book, "Linux in a Nutshell" (1997) which I still have. Red Hat was my first distro. I've never run anything but Linux and after the S100 bus died, I've stuck to Dell machines. I actually built and ran for 5 years Linux From Scratch.

However...
I am now 76 years old.  My brain has trouble learning new things. My mind is now better at recognition than recall.  Which means that I am better at multiple choice than answering questions. I am a cantankerous old fart with little patience for the inability of others to write in their native tongue and to comprehend what they read.
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#2
That's an impressive career.

A part of me wants to learn how to program with mainframes.  I know they are still in use today despite newer technology.  That is awesome!
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#3
You stated your first operating system was PIP.   
Didn't you have HDOS or CP/M for your Heathkit H89 all in one?
Idea Give a person a fish, and you feed them for a day. Teach a person how to fish, and you feed them for a lifetime. ✝️ Proverbs 4:7 Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.
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#4
I also have that book and started with 8080 and z80, first os c/pm ( I still have the full set of c/pm manuals in my shed ) ; and yes it's a lot easier to forget stuff now than to learn it but still doable, just takes longer and needs more notes lol.


ps: I didn't get to do computers for a living but I helped at a place that gave free computers to low income people and that is where I got all of my parts from.
Was a real pain to set around changing jumper settings over and over to find the right ones as most hardware there had no paperwork.
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#5
Albert. I have little idea what all your computer references are, but I congratulate you on your intolerance of illiteracy.

Cliff, a mere 67 year old stripling and pedant.
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#6
Ha ha , been there somewhat too. Started with the Coleco Adam and a little CPM , some basic and C . went from Dos 3.2 which I still have and a Smokin' (at that time) 486-33 sitting in the basement. 2X CD Rom and Colorado 256 tape backup. I too have the learning curve and remembering problems. I make lots of little notes on how too's . Love the community here and Joes' BBS. I still might have my copy of GT-powercom BBS somewhere. Still Lots of Fun :-) Tomorrow is my Birthday , I'll be 73. Geek , Biker and Opa !
Dos 3.2 to Win 10.
Main - Cinnamon 19.3 , alts Arch ,Manjaro
follow STL , eznix ,distrotube
   Resistance Is Not Futile!
       It's voltage divided by current
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#7
I would be very interested in stories about everything you have not forgotten, esp. working on mainframes.
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#8
(10-30-2018, 03:54 AM)deck_luck Wrote: You stated your first operating system was PIP.   
Didn't you have HDOS or CP/M for your Heathkit H89 all in one?
Yes. A perfect example of how flaky my memory is.  Yes, the OS of the Heathkit H89 was CP/M, which contained PIP, the Peripheral Interchange Program.

(10-30-2018, 04:40 AM)spudnuts Wrote: I also have that book and started with 8080 and z80, first os c/pm ( I still have the full set of c/pm manuals in my shed ) ; and yes it's a lot easier to forget stuff now than to learn it but still doable, just takes longer and needs more notes lol.


ps: I didn't get to do computers for a living but I helped at a place that gave free computers to low income people and that is where I got all of my parts from.
Was a real pain to set around changing jumper settings over and over to find the right ones as most hardware there had no paperwork.

I'll bet that your fondly remember serial printer cables with RS-232 connectors that were wired differently for every printer.
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#9
And I still have a 14 inch fanfold printer with the green and white stripes and a ream of paper for it lol (I hate to throw out working stuff) and an 8 inch floppy drive with an unopened box of disks.
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