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So new
#1
I'm new to Linux but not to computers. I went back to school at 38 to get a degree in Computer Networking and I'm graduating in a few weeks. One of my last classes is on Linux, and I'm really enjoying it. I know the impact Linux has on the Networking world and I want to have a firm grasp on Linux and learn as much as I can while still in school and as continue into IT. So that's why I'm here. 

I haven't downloaded my own distro yet and I'm not sure what kind of hardware I should put it onto. I did buy a Raspberry PI 4, I watched a YouTube video of this guy who said Raspberry PI's where great to learn Linux on. So I have that, but haven't set it up yet. My other thought was I would just install it onto a Vbox. 

I also don't know which distro to get. Like I said, I'm heading into Networking and I also want to get into security so I was thinking about Kali but I'm not sure if that's the best to learn Linux on.
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#2
I find it interesting that Linux is only in the last class.
I live in the IT world, and have for over 17 years.
The majority of all servers I have worked on were Linux/UNIX based.
By "the majority" I mean that in the last 5 years, 99% were Linux/UNIX based.
Why then  is there such little focus on Unix like systems?

I don't doubt you though,

There are several very knowledgeable Linux users here.
I believe I speak for most of us (correct me if I am wrong) when I say, feel free to pick our brains for info.

Welcome
A computer without Microsoft is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.


Telegram @eliasw4u
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#3
I suggest if you use vbox to make one for debian, centOS, suse, and freeBSD as those are the "base" distros for most everything.
As for the hardware to put stuff on well if you are just screwing around to learn stuff get some computers from the dump plenty of them are dualcore with 2 gigs memory which is fine to play with and who cares if it screws up it was free anyhow.
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#4
(08-12-2020, 01:58 AM)eliasw4u Wrote: I find it interesting that Linux is only in the last class.
I live in the IT world, and have for over 17 years.
The majority of all servers I have worked on were Linux/UNIX based.
By "the majority" I mean that in the last 5 years, 99% were Linux/UNIX based.
Why then  is there such little focus on Unix like systems?

I don't doubt you though,

There are several very knowledgeable Linux users here.
I believe I speak for most of us (correct me if I am wrong) when I say, feel free to pick our brains for info.

Welcome
Thanks for replying 

I'm not sure why such little focus on Unix, not only was this one of my last classes but it only runs 7 of the last 14 weeks. I'll say it's a basic class, I'm learning things like users and groups, Mkdir and mounting points. I'm starting to think it would have been better if they had more Unix based classes. As much as I have learned I think having a deeper understanding of Linux at the end of this course would have made more sense.
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#5
(08-12-2020, 10:31 AM)dea0127 Wrote: I'm not sure why such little focus on Unix, not only was this one of my last classes but it only runs 7 of the last 14 weeks. I'll say it's a basic class, I'm learning things like users and groups, Mkdir and mounting points. I'm starting to think it would have been better if they had more Unix based classes. As much as I have learned I think having a deeper understanding of Linux at the end of this course would have made more sense.

Perhaps the computer networking course you're enrolled in is intended to prepare students to pass a specific certification test, such as the CompTIA Network+ certification, which is "vendor neutral". Vendor neutral means you're learning about network hardware and general networking concepts that apply to all networks regardless of who made the hardware or software. In that case the Linux part of the course would be short and only cover the things about Linux that are different from general theory, like the specific way you create users and set user permissions in Linux vs Microsoft or Apple.

College course names and descriptions are always short and often vague. It's not intentional deception, but students are often surprised by what their classes contain not being what they expected.

There are a lot of free Linux tutorials online, ranging from 30 minutes to 20 hours. Some deal with specific aspects of Linux and others try to cover everything. Several people I know recommend the ones made by The Linux Foundation. https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-to-linux They are free if you just want to learn, but if you want a piece of paper that says you passed the course it will cost you $199. I chose to get the free education and let them keep the certificate, but that's just me.

Addendum to what I just posted:

In a different thread deck_luck recommended the Linux Foundation URL I already mentioned and these additional resources:

The Joe Collin's EzeeLinux Youtube channel has a very good Bash Basics Playlist.  

I would encourage you to check out the The Linux Command Line training web site.  It is a reasonable site for learning the command line and understanding bash.  Also, the site has a free The Linux Command Line A Book By William Shotts downloadable PDF book.
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#6
(08-12-2020, 12:14 AM)dea0127 Wrote: I did buy a Raspberry PI 4, I watched a YouTube video of this guy who said Raspberry PI's where great to learn Linux on.

A while back, just for fun, I decided to test Moore's Law by comparing the PI 4 specs to an HP Pavilion desktop computer I bought in January 2006.
The attached image shows the comparison. It looks to me like the PI has a slight edge, but not much.

FWIW I still use that 2006 HP Pavilion. I'm running Ubuntu 20.04 on it and it works fine unless I try to watch certain longish YouTube videos in full screen. Then CPU and/or video RAM get overloaded and it freezes. For ordinary web surfing it's still a viable machine, thanks to Ubuntu. If I put a lighter weight Buntu flavor on it, I could probably even watch those videos full screen.


.jpg   PI 4 vs 2006 HP Pavilion.jpg (Size: 56.9 KB / Downloads: 3)
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