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What Common Mistakes Should We Warn Newbies About?
#1
We've all made newbie mistakes while learning Linux. While many mistakes are annoying but harmless, some can cause irreversible harm or mess something up in a way you won't notice until something mysteriously stops working.

What is your list of the most important or most common mistakes newbie Linux users should be warned about?

I'll start with chmod and chown. Using either of those with a wildcard or in recursive mode or without understanding that the "execute" permission has a special meaning when applied to directories can get you in a whole lot of trouble. Here is a real-life example: https://askubuntu.com/questions/970317/a...-chmod-600 

And I once locked myself out of an important directory by mistakenly changing its permissions to 600 when I should have said 700.

So the lesson is: Beginners should set up a dummy installation of Linux on an old/spare computer (as Fearless Leader always suggests) and use that for practicing/testing anything that isn't absolutely familiar.

Please add your own "Don't do this" suggestions to this list. Thanks.
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#2
Don't assume the way you currently do things is the best way. It might not even be a good way at all. If you are willing to learn and try out things you do not know yet, you might find something new you prefer. (This applies to users of every experience level).
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#3
Trusted Backups

You can never have too many trusted backups.  Not only should users create backups on multiple external backup storage devices, but they should also perform restoration tests.  Acquire another storage device and swap out your active boot device.  Can you successfully restore to the replacement device?  Fully document your method. 

Trusted Backups are proven restorable backups and also under go proactive maintenance on the backup storage devices.
Idea Give a person a fish, and you feed them for a day. Teach a person how to fish, and you feed them for a lifetime. ✝️ Proverbs 4:7 Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.  (Linux Mint 19 XFCE)
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#4
(08-01-2020, 03:11 PM)Skipayear Wrote: We've all made newbie mistakes while learning Linux. While many mistakes are annoying but harmless, some can cause irreversible harm or mess something up in a way you won't notice until something mysteriously stops working.

What is your list of the most important or most common mistakes newbie Linux users should be warned about?

I'll start with chmod and chown. Using either of those with a wildcard or in recursive mode or without understanding that the "execute" permission has a special meaning when applied to directories can get you in a whole lot of trouble. Here is a real-life example: https://askubuntu.com/questions/970317/a...-chmod-600 

And I once locked myself out of an important directory by mistakenly changing its permissions to 600 when I should have said 700.

So the lesson is: Beginners should set up a dummy installation of Linux on an old/spare computer (as Fearless Leader always suggests) and use that for practicing/testing anything that isn't absolutely familiar.

Please add your own "Don't do this" suggestions to this list. Thanks.
I'm definitely a beginner and I would like to install Ubuntu on a Lenovo Yoga which has windows installed. I'm finding lots of information about adding Ubuntu with Windows, but I'd like to have just Ubuntu to avoid the pitfalls I keep reading about. I've downloaded Ubuntu on a flashdrive but I'm not sure how to boot from the USB. Please direct me to another thread if this has been covered. Thank you. ugh, I feel so green.
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#5
Sherry.

It would better to start a topic of your own rather than hijacking this one, but as you are here I suggest you watch a few of Joe Collins videos from a couple of years ago.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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