Poll: 20.04 Hit or Miss?
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Hit
71.43%
5 71.43%
Miss
28.57%
2 28.57%
Total 7 vote(s) 100%
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20.04 Hit Or Miss?
#1
I have been running Ubuntu 18.04 with Gnome for a while now, at least 9 months, maybe a year.

when I started playing with installers back in 2000 I tried Ubuntu. And stuck with it (Part-time) until 2010, where I went full-time Linux. I tried Arch around 2012. but it was to clunky for me at the time. So I went back to Ubuntu Unity. But in 2014 I tried the late great Antergos, and loved it. It was still Arch. but with style. A Lazy mans Arch if you will. Then in late 2014 I installed Arch vanilla on a secondary hard drive. And for the time, found my home. But after five years of having to update every day, I became tired of it and went back to Ubuntu. first I tried Kubuntu 18.04 and liked it. But it was VERY slow on the boot time. so I went back to Arch.

Eventually I tried Ubuntu Gnome 18.04 and surprisingly I liked it a lot! The point of all that is to show that I am familiar with Ubuntu, and even fond of it. anyway,
So as you can imagine, I was very exited that 20.04 was coming out. The day of its official release I downloaded it, and installed it. It was buggy, but I was okay with it because it was "Hot Off The Press".... And then installed gnome-tweaks,,, to find it only had two choices. That was a deal breaker for me. My work flow does not allow for the min/max/close buttons to be on the right side. I also used other options in the tweaks and I can not do without any of them, options that are no longer in 20.04 tweaks. There were many other little things that bugged me. But that was the straw...

very underwhelmed and saddened. But anyway,

I went back to 18.04. I will stay here until I find something better. I am VERY close to dropping to Debian Gnome.
All the apps I use are still one click with Debian. but I like the polish of Ubuntu better. I may go Arch again, and polish it myself. But that is time I don't have right now.

Bottom line,
I will play with it in a VM for a while, but
For me, unfortunately, Ubuntu 20.04 was a disastrous FLOP.

the question is, how is it working for everyone else?
leave a post. And vote!


kudos
A computer without Microsoft is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.


Telegram @eliasw4u
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#2
I have been running Ubuntu 20.04 as a virtual machine since about December. One thing I have found about the Tweaks is that it has a bug. It opens with the two choices you mentioned, and I have to double clink on the title bar to get an arrow to return to the Tweaks menu. Then it is like it has always been in Gnome.

My daily driver is Ubuntu 16.04. I like the Unity desktop and plan to use it until the end of life. (Either mine or 16.04, whichever comes first.)

I have run virtual Arch machines with LXDE, LXQt, Maté, and a custom desktop I built on an Openbox base. I found that once I became familiar with Arch, and with BASH scripting, that Arch is easier for me to work with. The Arch Wikis are easy to access and are thorough, but they are somewhat technical, not geared to the general user. Whereas the Ubuntu technical documents are geared to ordinary users. To find the technical stuff I want to know I have to search other web sites. The more I use Arch the better I like it

Richard
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#3
Definite HIT - Smashed right out of the Park - (with one caveat).
I'm a total Nub with Linux - I've  just washed my hands of 30+ years with Microsoft.
I originally loaded The 20.04 Ubuntu and couldn't get on with the Desktop ( It may be the Unity)/
Anyway it wasn't Active and i couldn't place anything directly onto it - but the side vertical area soon filled up.
I searched for a fix and soon got frustrated not finding one so i wasn't particularly happy with all system, swap and data on the same SSD partition
 So i decided to reinstall MATE  and used 3 EXT4 Partitions but without a Boot Partition on my 250Gb SSD
- just the 30Gb System, 4Gb Swap and remainder being the Home.
Setting Printers, WIFI  and NAS was almost automatic - just asking for usernames and passwords - Try doing that with WINDOWS 10.
Also the speed in which all this was accomplished - very impressed.
So All in All My learning curve has got balistic and i'm not going to look at Windows again - well maybe in a VM :>)
Why didn't i do this a long time ago.
All the Best one and All
Keep Safe

John
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#4
Hit - (A solid 8.5 out of 10)

A few years ago, I had two computers and one license for Windows. I started to use Ubuntu 18.04 because a professor of mine used it. I installed and used it for a while, but it seemed clunky in some ways, and the colors were just outside Barstow when the drugs began to take hold. I loved/hated the Ubuntu dock because it got in the way all the time (it was in bat country). I distro-hopped to Fedora and used it through 31.

With Fedora 32 on the way, I wanted to see what is currently out there. I installed Ubuntu 20.04 (the beta and then the release). It has an easy way to get rid of the dock, and my stats and research software are in the repositories. I had to install the gnome store, but now I have apt, flatpaks, and snaps. The once older clunkiness is now gone, and it does what I need for my graduate work. It makes it hard to go back to Fedora (when 32 drops), but Fedora works better with my system, masterful with my work-flow, and it is vanilla gnome central, which I enjoy. I like the up-to-date packages, and I do not have to go with a rolling release; it is a happy medium that fits me.

Ubuntu 20.04 rocks out of the gate, and I might build a box and stick it on it as a backup. Debian testing is a bit better, but that takes more effort to get it spinning, and I am earning a MA and PhD at the moment. Ubuntu 20.04 hits on all cylinders, but one thing remains; the ubuntu software store needs some work, and the 20.04.1 release should cover it. Once that happens, it will fit the reputation that Ubuntu has earned as the solid, universal Linux platform for humans.
Retlaw, the other soldier A.

(Numbers 6:24-26)
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#5
I am running Ubuntu 20.04 on an external HDD, and my main distro is Linux Mint 19.3.

Good impression from the start - it picked up my wireless Canon scanner from boot, and I couldn't ever get Linux Mint to work with the scanner side. It turns out Ubuntu 20.04 packs the "AirScan" SANE driver out of the box, and that helps a LOT of scanners to work off of WiFi with no messing around. (I did manage to get instructions later to get AirScan going on Linux Mint 19.3.)

It seems faster than the last time I played around with 18.04 on a similar setup. It takes nearly 5 minutes to first load, but that's because I'm using a USB HDD on a machine that only supports USB 2.0. After it loads up, it is responsive.

I'm probably still sticking with Linux Mint on the main HDD - and LM 20 wlll be out in a few months (?) with Ubuntu 20.04 as a base. But I'll still play around with it for now.
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#6
(04-27-2020, 12:52 AM)Richard Wrote: I have run virtual Arch machines with LXDE, LXQt, Maté, and a custom desktop I built on an Openbox base. I found that once I became familiar with Arch, and with BASH scripting, that Arch is easier for me to work with. The Arch Wikis are easy to access and are thorough, but they are somewhat technical, not geared to the general user. Whereas the Ubuntu technical documents are geared to ordinary users. To find the technical stuff I want to know I have to search other web sites. The more I use Arch the better I like it

Richard

I adore Arch. I truly do. So much in fact that (as you know) I created Arrow Linux. In July I am planing on making a new iteration of it. totally revamped. But right now I don't have the time. ArrowLinux isn't dead, it is just on a break.
I will probably go back to Arch, I just needed a break from all the updates. On rare occasions an update will break something. that was never a problem for me. I like to fix stuff, Arch was like a glove for me, it just fit. All except for the relentless updates. you know what I am talking about. anyone who runs Arch knows.
Update your system, and 30 minutes later there is another update. It is both good, and bad. I could have created a script to do all that for me, but where is the fun in that? ........ Actually...... I am going to try that in a VM.

Thanks for the info about tweaks. I will check it out. Sounds like I might have been just a little bit spastic. I tell everyone to try it (whatever distro) in a VM first. Then I went and put it on metal immediately. I know better. I guess I was just expecting more from Ubuntu out of the box. but your info suggests that it is tweaks rather than Ubuntu.... I feel like a dummy. But I can only blame myself.

anyways,
kudos
A computer without Microsoft is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.


Telegram @eliasw4u
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#7
As much as I hate to admit this, I have to eat my words.

20.04 has a small learning curve,
Tweaks does things different now. and starts in the General tab, and on start only shows 2 options and no other info. It gives no indicator. Which led me to believe that it only had two options. And from what I can tell, it is not a bug, just a bad design. I hope they get that worked out soon. But anyway, Ubuntu is still buggy, but usable. I am thinking that with a little more time I will pull a 180% on this opinion. currently it is about a 90% turn. still not good enough to put on my metal. but it is getting there fast.

when I am wrong, I am wrong.
Ubuntu 20.04 isn't bad, just a little buggy, but that is to be expected this soon after the official release.
A computer without Microsoft is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.


Telegram @eliasw4u
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#8
Ok so I have been playing with Ubuntu 20.04 for two days in a VM and the number one thing that gets me now is showing the connected devices in the dock. that is a really bad idea. especially for those with multiple hard drives. on my BOX i have 6, and i always have 2 or 3 USBs connected. so this will not work for me. my dock would be full right off the bat. and there is no clickable way to get rid of this.

so....... if you are like me and do not want connected devices displayed in the dock, open a terminal and enter this
Code:
gsettings set org.gnome.shell.extensions.dash-to-dock show-mounts false
No need to install anything there, just telling it to go away.

To find your connected devices just open Nautilus (Or whatever file manager you have installed) they are in there.

Hope that helped.

kudos
A computer without Microsoft is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.


Telegram @eliasw4u
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#9
One good way to avoid all of that is to use Xubuntu. The XFCE desktop is simpler, and you design your own dock.

Richard
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#10
(04-29-2020, 12:18 AM)eliasw4u Wrote: Ok so I have been playing with Ubuntu 20.04 for two days in a VM and the number one thing that gets me now is showing the connected devices in the dock. that is a really bad idea. especially for those with multiple hard drives. on my BOX i have 6, and i always have 2 or 3 USBs connected. so this will not work for me. my dock would be full right off the bat. and there is no clickable way to get rid of this.

so....... if you are like me and do not want connected devices displayed in the dock, open a terminal and enter this
Code:
gsettings set org.gnome.shell.extensions.dash-to-dock show-mounts false
No need to install anything there, just telling it to go away.

To find your connected devices just open Nautilus (Or whatever file manager you have installed) they are in there.

Hope that helped.

kudos


It's too bad they didn't add a GUI menu feature to toggle the setting on or off.  I know back in 16.04 with Unity, one can also right click the connected device's icon in the dock and select "Unlock from Launcher" to remove the icon from the dock without ejecting the device.  But that was Unity, and it would still be a pain to perform that every boot with lots of devices.  Still, if Gnome offers that selection, it would be an option for someone with only one or two devices who still wants the odd USB to show up on the dock.  Better yet, it would be nice if there were an easy way to whitelist mounted drives in the dock. 

Anyway, your suggestion is best (quicker, easier, safer), but one can also turn it off or on in a graphical environment using Dconf Editor.  The usual warnings about fooling with unfamiliar settings in Dconf apply.  Again, it's just a shame it's all or nothing.

I hope I get some time to play with 20.04 soon.
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