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An observation
#1
I have been active on here for eighteen months. In that time, it has seemed that half of the posts are by people having problems with Mint. (Probably not that many, but it seems like it.) I rarely see such a post about Ubuntu. I have used Ubuntu for fifteen years and have found it to be predictable and trouble free. It makes me wonder: what is it about Mint that has people choose it over Ubuntu?

Richard
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#2
I've been using Lnux Mint as my daily driver for several years and have had few problems with it. Most of those were dumb things that I did. I also have machines running LMDE, Debian, MX Linux, and Ubunutu. I've run into more problems with these other distributions largely becasuse I am not as familiar with them as I am with Mint. Mint does some things differently than Debian and Ubumtu so sometimes I see unexpected behavior.

I suspect that it may not be Mint that's the problem but the experience level in general of some of these Mint users, particularly those who are switching from Windows. That's just an idea I'm thowing out there based on my own experience and observations. Just my 2 cents.
Rick Romig
"It's never wrong to introduce a child to Linux."
@ludditegeek
Rick's Tech Stuff
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#3
Methinks rickromig hit the nail on the head. A lot of former Windows users (including me) flocked to Linux when Win 7 approached, reached, or passed EOL rather than downgrade to Win 10. Mint is the distro most frequently recommended for Windows refugees so that is the one being adopted by the newbies the most. Inexperience with Linux by these users (again, including me) is probably the reason for the uptick in Mint problems.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#4
I'm not very experienced but tried out both and Ubuntu is definitely much easier to deal with, rarely I had any issues I couldn't solve. With Mint even booting from usb was problematic sometimes (tried in different computers) but also adjusting screen resolution, making audio work, peripheral...
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#5
Hello @Richard,
I will have to also agree with @Rickromig and @Lady Filzgerald.
98% of my small issues with Mint was when I came from Windows. While I was not a refugee, I was tired of Win 10 and the STUFF they do. I mad 95% of my own problems... Lol

While I also believe that when you see folks with a issue it is generally when someone is experimenting and trying to see what is what with this New Thing Called Linux! I know I did, I am a tinker, I like to see how things work...  Big Grin
This has been my go to forum for help. There's a ton of knowledge on this forum!

True there are issues from time to time with a Linux Distro and Mint is not different.
I use Arch (Arch Way), Manjaro, MX, Mint, EndeavourOS, Debian, Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server and a slew of VM's (virtual machines)... On Laptops and Desktops from Dell and Custom builds from used junk from eBay. Linux just works!

One thing is a constant, Linux is Linux underneath, while some Distro's may do some things a little different at times they are 99.9% the same, The Desktop's and the philosophy for the Distro's are what make some of them, lets say interesting... Lol

While there are several major Desktops (DE), Window Managers, Large install's, Minimal Install's, it is all Linux and the user makes the decisions on what to use and not to use, not what some Company and what they want.
Linux is a learning experience if you want to know how it works or just a Operating System if you don't and just want to surf the interwebs...
While it is true Linux is not perfect it is the Best OS out there and you can change a whole range of things to make, customize, shape it into what you want Linux to be for you!
That in itself is where the "Problems" come from and the need for this Forum and folks to Help when the need arises...  Smile
Well at any rate that is my 2 cents worth...
That and $25 bucks will get ya a cup of coffee from Starbucks... Lol

LLAP
**********************************************************
Taglines of the BBS Days:
Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday. 
  Everybody remember where we parked. - Kirk
    Not everything in life is a 1 or a 0.
       Experience enables you to recognise a mistake when you make it again...
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#6
I used to think that it was a noob thing with Mint.
But not any more.

I do lots of test installs, checking out the installers and the tools... and I read a lot too.

Mint is under staffed. They seem to have $ but that is not enough.
It takes a team, one that is dedicated to Stability, as a core.
and, the focus on artwork, and fancy toys diverts them from creating a Good distro.

side issue: the Timeshift app, it sucks. It is so so easy to miss use it, difficult to set up and maintain... outside testing from some folks other than the core team in sorely needed.

recent comment from a well respected Developer "Personal, i wouldn't use a distro without issue tracker"
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#7
(04-21-2020, 03:05 PM)mexsudo Wrote: ...side issue: the Timeshift app, it sucks. It is so so easy to miss use it, difficult to set up and maintain... outside testing from some folks other than the core team in sorely needed...

Curious. I don't have trouble with it. The key to using it successfully, same as with any other software, is to use for it's intended purpose. Its purpose is more like Windows System Restore (only better; System Restore was hit and miss for me in XP and flat didn't work for me in Win 7). It's not intended to be a backup for restoring a completely missing or badly damaged OS. Instead, Timeshift intended to restore an otherwise intact OS to the state it was in when the snapshot was taken. For that purpose, it works just fine. An example of it's intended use is you want to try out a new program. In Linux, programs aren't stored in one neat little package like they are in Windows. They have bits and pieces that are scattered all over the place, many of which are shared with other programs. You can uninstall a program you recently installed but there will be fragments of it still remaining. However, if made a Timeshift snapshot before installing the program, if you don't like the program or it's problematic, you can simply restore that snapshot and it will be as though the new program never existed.

I do not recommend scheduled snapshots. They will eventually eat up space on a computer and are really not necessary. Also, there is the danger that Timeshift may start making a scheduled snapshot while you are in the middle of something else, which could mess up either the snapshot, the something else, or both. I prefer to choose when to manually make my snapshots, including the weekly one I make "just in case" I frequently weed out older snapshots I'm never going to need (other than the initial ones I made when setting up the computer). The only downside to manually making snapshots is you have to remember to make them.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#8
I settled on Mint because it was the most recommended Linux for a new user like me escaping from Microsoft. Since then it has worked so well I simply can't be bothered to even look at alternatives, let alone try any of them. I don't want to tinker with it, I don't want to mess about with the command line, I don't want learn anything more than is necessary. I simply want the computer to do its job, and as long as it continues to do so I am content to forget about it for the 18 hours per day when it is switched off.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#9
(04-21-2020, 04:07 PM)cliffcoggin Wrote: I settled on Mint because it was the most recommended Linux for a new user like me escaping from Microsoft. Since then it has worked so well I simply can't be bothered to even look at alternatives, let alone try any of them. I don't want to tinker with it, I don't want to mess about with the command line, I don't want learn anything more than is necessary. I simply want the computer to do its job, and as long as it continues to do so I am content to forget about it for the 18 hours per day when it is switched off.

Dang! That could have been written by me. My sentiments exactly!
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#10
It's easy to assume from reading this and similar forums that Mint users are either enthusiasts who enjoy tinkering with computers or newcomers who are having problems. I suspect, but can not demonstrate, that there is also a large unseen group of users who never appear on the forums because their computers just work.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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