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Home partition
#1
I have watched some YouTube videos from Joe Collins. Some were based on older versions of Linux Mint. I have Mint Cinnamon 19.3 installed. I did the first option on installation - the automatic one. It set up a swap partition, I think. I have a small SSD which I think it ignored and left unformatted.

Is it worth having a separate home partition for my data?

The SSD is 24 GB. Is there something useful I can do with that drive?

I am willing to reinstall as it is early days with this installation. I am in no hurry. Most of my computing is with Windows anyway. The laptop I use for Linux is one which was struggling under Windows but works fine with Linux. It is Linux only.

thanks.
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#2
(03-23-2020, 07:11 AM)Spiderspoon Wrote: I have watched some YouTube videos from Joe Collins. Some were based on older versions of Linux Mint. I have Mint Cinnamon 19.3 installed. I did the first option on installation - the automatic one. It set up a swap partition, I think. I have a small SSD which I think it ignored and left unformatted.

Is it worth having a separate home partition for my data?

The SSD is 24 GB. Is there something useful I can do with that drive?

I am willing to reinstall as it is early days with this installation. I am in no hurry. Most of my computing is with Windows anyway. The laptop I use for Linux is one which was struggling under Windows but works fine with Linux. It is Linux only.

thanks.

Hi.  Your laptop has a hard drive and an SSD?  If so, and you installed to the hard drive, the SSD may not be set up to auto-mount at startup.  I do not use Cinnamon, but in KDE there is a setting under system settings that you may have to change.  If the SSD is not formatted, you may have to create a partition on it and format it.  This can be done with Gparted, but be careful not to partition and format the hard drive.  BTW, my laptop (Lenovo T420) has two SSDs.  One has linux Mint 17.3 (KDE) and the other has SolydK and a separate data partition.  If your system has a hard drive and an SSD, you should install the OS to the SSD, it will allow faster boot times.  Use the hard drive for data.  Just my $.02.
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#3
I think you will find that Mint 19 installs a swap file rather than a swap partition. Look in Disks to check this point.

Disks will also show if your SSD is formatted for ext4 which is the Linux default.

Whether you set a separate home partition is a matter of personal choice. Having it separate makes a future OS installation or upgrade easier, but involves more work and difficulty now.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#4
(03-24-2020, 11:29 AM)cliffcoggin Wrote: I think you will find that Mint 19 installs a swap file rather than a swap partition. Look in Disks to check this point.

Disks will also show if your SSD is formatted for ext4 which is the Linux default.

Whether you set a separate home partition is a matter of personal choice. Having it separate makes a future OS installation or upgrade easier, but involves more work and difficulty now.

During installation, Mint 19.x creates a swap partition. It just asks you what size to make it.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#5
See here at about 17 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GHT3REjXxU
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#6
Someone needs to do a video specifically on this. Thanks for that clip, Cliff.
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#7
(03-23-2020, 07:11 AM)Spiderspoon Wrote: Is it worth having a separate home partition for my data?

The SSD is 24 GB. Is there something useful I can do with that drive?

I am willing to reinstall as it is early days with this installation. I am in no hurry. Most of my computing is with Windows anyway. The laptop I use for Linux is one which was struggling under Windows but works fine with Linux. It is Linux only.

thanks.

In most cases it is not necessary

that being said. i have always used a home partition.
the reason being so that it is easier to switch distros without loosing any of your data, and it makes it a little harder to hack the system successfully. Marginally harder. And most of my restore scripts are programmed for a home partition. I am a creature of habit  it is up to you. what works best for you.

as for the 24 GB SSD
if you do a home partition. and don't install a ton of programs you could use it as your root

my root partition is 42GB but I am only using 18.6GB and i have everything i need for programing,
gaming, chatting, office work, and surfing the net. lots of apps and i am using Ubuntu 18.04 with default gnome. and we all know how heavy that is. never had a problem.
i have never ran out of space. even when i had a smaller drive and only had 25GB for root.

again, it is not necessary. but it also doesn't hurt.

there are things to keep in mind. if you use a home partition and install a new system over the top of an existing one without formatting the home partition you might have some conflicts with your configuration files.

what i do is save everything in the home partition into a backup folder in the same partition. or delete all the configuration files. then i install the new. doing it like that i have never had a problem.

there will be varying opinions on this. some will tell you it is a bad idea, others will tell you it is the only way to go. ultimately it is up to you.

I suggest you play around with it. see if it works for you. if you can, try it in a vm first. set it up the way you like it and then install a new distro over the top of it to see its affect. it is something you can play with. But do it in a VM first. until you are comfortable with it

anyway, that is my $0.02

kudos
A computer without Microsoft is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.


Telegram @eliasw4u
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#8
(03-23-2020, 07:11 AM)Spiderspoon Wrote: I have watched some YouTube videos from Joe Collins. Some were based on older versions of Linux Mint. I have Mint Cinnamon 19.3 installed. I did the first option on installation - the automatic one. It set up a swap partition, I think. I have a small SSD which I think it ignored and left unformatted.

Is it worth having a separate home partition for my data?

The SSD is 24 GB. Is there something useful I can do with that drive?

I am willing to reinstall as it is early days with this installation. I am in no hurry. Most of my computing is with Windows anyway. The laptop I use for Linux is one which was struggling under Windows but works fine with Linux. It is Linux only.

thanks.

My friend, you really have to learn how to ask questions on forums. You give us very little information, so essentially any reply will have an element of speculation.

It would be helpful to have your full system specs.

In general, when you do an automatic install, you pick a hard drive which is then wiped and auto-partitioned by the installer.

To use a second hard drive you have to partition your system manually.

Manual partitioning is harder than the automatic process, but if you start to tinker with Linux, the manual process is a useful thing to learn.

You don't have to re-install, by the way. Under Linux, you can resize partitions or add drives to a living system. Look into gparted:

https://gparted.org/

But reinstalling may be easier than using these tools and editing fstab.

One use for the small drive maybe something like an internal backup drive. You could copy anything to that 2nd drive you want to keep, in case your other drive dies or your re-format.
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