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Memory consequences of deleting a file?
#1
I frequently delete files from my Linux desktop (right click + delete). But where do they go? In my old "windows" days I'd periodically delete files in the trash to free up memory. But how does this work in Linux? Is there a persistent burden on memory because these deleted files linger somewhere else? What should I do about this?
Regards, Jeff Guynn
Durham, NC (USA)
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#2
Hi Jeff. Well, the Debian based distros that I use do have a trash can. It is not necessary visible, but you can install it by right clicking and go to install widgets. If I delete files in Dolphin File Manager, they are just gone. The delete option is not enabled by default, you must enable it in settings. I think you may be confusing memory with storage. Your hard drive or SSD is storage, and is where files are stored (even if they are in the trash can). Memory in a computer is temporary storage, where things are worked on, then saved to the hard drive. Think of computer memory like a chalkboard in a classroom. At the end of the class, the chalkboard is erased to be ready for the next class. Hopefully the students have written down any information from the chalkboard that they will need later. The chalkboard is like the computer's memory. The student's notes are like the hard drive.
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#3
(02-13-2020, 07:57 PM)jhguynn Wrote: I frequently delete files from my Linux desktop (right click + delete). But where do they go? In my old "windows" days I'd periodically delete files in the trash to free up memory. But how does this work in Linux? Is there a persistent burden on memory because these deleted files linger somewhere else? What should I do about this?

If you right click-delete...the file would be deleted from the System...I would image.  Big Grin  I always put the Trash icon on the Desktop which makes it easy to empty when needed as I sometimes use...Move to Trash.

Ram is Memory not space...when you delete files...videos etc...you're freeing up space on the Drive which works the same in Windoze.  So I wouldn't worry about it if I were you.  [Image: smileys-thumbs-315757.gif]

Something important to remember when deleting Files or anything else from External HDDs or Flash Drives...always select..."Delete" not "Move to Trash".    If you select "Move to Trash"...the Files...Videos etc will still be on the Drive taking up space.

To see these Files or Videos that have been "Moved to Trash"...plug in the External HDD or Flash Drive when it mounts...right click anywhere on the Drive...you will see "Show Hidden Files"...click it and you'll see a Folder called Trash-1000...double click it...you'll see two Folders...files and info.  Open the folders and you'll see all the files or videos etc that are still on the Drive.  [Image: smileys-afraid-028547.gif]

So now you need to delete both these Folders...don't worry both will be returned empty once the Drive is Mounted again...hope this helps.  Big Grin
Linux Forever...Windoze Never       [Image: t12701.gif]
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#4
As stated many desktop distros use a Trash can directory/folder like Windows.   This way you can restore files if you accidentally delete a file/folder.

This occurs when you use a file manager.  If you ever use the command line there is no safety net.

Your deleted files should be in the following directory.  Some file managers like Caja do show the Trash folder.

/home/[USER NAME]/.local/share/Trash
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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