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ffmpeg: Changing the encoded date and recorded date
#1
How do you change encoded date and the recorded date of a MP4 file using ffmpeg? I tried this command but I think the issue is the date/time format is not correct for ffmpeg and I cannot figure out what it is.


No matter what I try, when I open the new MP4 file in the Media Info application, it does not show a recorded date or an encoded date field, but the original file does have an recorded date or an encoded date field.

Here is the command that I been using to make a copy of the video but with a different encoded date and different recorded date field.
Code:
ffmpeg -i video.mp4 -vcodec copy -acodec copy -metadata recorded="2014-12-31T23:44:55" -metadata encoded="2014-12-31T23:44:55" video2.mp4

Any help will be most appreciated
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#2
ffmpeg is probably the wrong tool for this. It will literally re-encode the video, but all you want is to just change the metadata. Also I believe ffmpeg copies the already existing metadata and simply appends your new tags; I am not sure about mp4, but that is common modern container formats (you could have multiple "artist" tags in a music file without problems, for example).

So instead try using a dedicated metadata editor. If you want a terminal-one, in the past I have used "AtomicParsley". If you prefer GUI, currently I am happy with "Picard".
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#3
AtomicParsley and Picard seem to edit the tags, I guess what I am exactly looked to change from a MP4 file is the "recorded date" and the "encoded date" attribute, not tag. I cannot find any software that easily does this on Linux.
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#4
(02-04-2020, 01:26 PM)trymeout Wrote: AtomicParsley and Picard seem to edit the tags, I guess what I am exactly looked to change from a MP4 file is the "recorded date" and the "encoded date" attribute, not tag. I cannot find any software that easily does this on Linux.

If I am not mistaken, those are also basically just tags. Both the programs I mentioned are more geared towards audio files, however if you knew the exact name of the tag-field, you could probably change it (or click around in picard and see if it has a more verbose tag-explorer).
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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