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"Pre-sale" question
#1
Hey y'all. Given Win 7 EOL, I'm exploring alternatives. I'm keeping win 7, but take security issues seriously, so would like to start playing around with Linux and have the idea that I can "weave" it into my routine. The immediate usage would be to employ it for downloading bank transaction files and transferring the files to an offline Win 7 machine that I use exclusively for my business and personal books (QuickBooks and Quicken).

But I guess the preliminary question would be:

The machine I would be installing Linux to has several HDDs with several partitions. My plan is to unplug the existing system drive (windows) and plug in a formatted SSD to install Linux to. I will just power down and switch drives when I need Linux. My concern is the other partitions. I would need to use the data on these partitions regardless of the OS. Will there be any impact on these partitions if one switches back and forth? Any other caveats I haven't thought of?

Having read a couple of negative posts about Mint 'going downhill', I also wonder if Mint is the best option.

I'm tech adept and have been building and using Windows machines for years, but have zero experience with Linux. Thanks for any help.
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#2
A simple way to pull data from the bank on Linux would be to d/l data to a USB stick , as the files aren't 'That' large I think. Then copy them to the Win. 7 when it's up. The Stick is a nice backup too. Linux on SSD will fly too ! btw SSD don't like de-fraging. Also when you boot Win. 7 you need to disable LAN of course. A separate box is much easier tho. ; get a used one later ? and just move the SSD. small tweaks needed to do that but much easier than Win. (eg. uninstall proprietary GPU drivers) or just reinstall after a good backup. (Timeshift)

did a quick search and saw this blog.
gnucash I know "SwitchedToLinux" uses it.
https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions...ks-660777/
I'm not into the accounting but you may transition to a Linux solution at your convenience.
the blog suggests moneydance , etc. how many work or you can trust ?
Dos 3.2 to Win 10.
Main - Cinnamon 19.2
   Resistance Is Not Futile!
       It's voltage divided by current
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#3
I'm not entirely clear whether you have more than one drive in the computer at the same time. If you do, there is no need to physically remove and replace any of them. I suggest you dedicate one drive for Linux so that you have a dual (or triple or quadruple) boot computer, then use the GRUB menu to select which drive you want to start. You will read many valid objections to dual boot computers, but they generally relate to having two OS on the same drive, whereas separate drives overcome that problem.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#4
Another alternative is to install both drives in one box. Instead of using grub, which I did successfully for years, you can install a small double pole double switch to switch the 5v and 12v leads between the drives. You must select which drive you want to boot from before you power up.

If you are uncomfortable with the mechanical or electrical part of this, then my method is not practical.
You would also not be able to exchange data between the Win7 machine and the Linux side directly. If that is a necessity, the grub method  would be the way to go.

I also have a work station associated with my ham radio station with two computers, one on 19.2 and the other on win7.  Win 7 is required to operate the ham radio program. I switch between them with a KVM switch. This offers no protection to the internet facing win7 computer, but allows both of them to be conveniently accessed from my work station.

As with any thing computer related... lots of choices.
paul
W9PCS

Resistance Is Not Futile!
It's voltage divided by current



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#5
If the other partitions you refer to are ntfs or fat 32 you should have no problems accessing them from both OSes.
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#6
Thank you for your responses. At this point, switching drives will be easiest, since the case of the machine in question allows easy access. It has several SSD bays that are easily accessible by leaving the Left side panel off...just a matter of shutting down the system and plugging in the power cable dangling in place.
At this point I'm just checking Linux out. Since, business -wise, I doubt I'll be able to dump windows altogether, I think I should be able to incorporate Linux into my workflow.
As to building another machine, I'm actually trying to reduce the number of machines in my office.

@spudnuts - I think that answers my question...both systems should read without issue.

@paul - Good idea re: inline switch. Given the ease of access, I won't need it at this point, but definitely something worth remembering.

One question I might ask...I use MediaMonkey for my music database. Is there a comparable media player in Linux? My MM database goes back to 2002, so I'm hoping to find one that owrks in linux and will import and convert the metadata.
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#7
(02-02-2020, 09:46 PM)Bob. Wrote: One question I might ask...I use MediaMonkey for my music database. Is there a comparable media player in Linux? My MM database goes back to 2002, so I'm hoping to find one that owrks in linux and will import and convert the metadata.

Never heard of MediaMonkey, but here are lots of media players in Linux. Look here:
https://alternativeto.net
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#8
(02-02-2020, 09:46 PM)Bob. Wrote: ...One question I might ask...I use MediaMonkey for my music database. Is there a comparable media player in Linux? My MM database goes back to 2002, so I'm hoping to find one that owrks in linux and will import and convert the metadata.

I used Media Monkey in Win 7. I haven't found a music player that resembles Media Monkey for Linux yet but I've been using VLC media player instead. While the GUI is less than stellar and I haven't found a skin for it I like (yet), I still prefer VLC over Media Monkey because it has more features for tailoring the sound for my speakers and ears, most notably volume normalization and dynamic range compression.

I have VLC set as my default player for .mp3 files so all I have to is go my music folder and pick the tracks I want to play. I also made various playlists, using VLC, that I keep in a folder on my desktop. To play one, I just open the folder, then click on the playlist I want. I can set VLC to play selected music in order or play it randomly.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#9
On my Lenovo T430 I plug in another drive either in the removable  ultra bay tray or USB port.  Reboot, hit F12 and select which drive to boot from, no messing with GRUB and all that.  Sometimes I also use Virtual Box. When I'm all finished, remove the drive and put it away if I want to and boot from my main (Linux Mint) SSD drive.  Cool
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