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Now for the next dumb question.
#1
I have Timeshift set up with the sda4 partition (my data partition) chosen in Location. I had assumed that Timeshift was making snapshots of the Linux System itself (installed on sda 2) and is saving the snapshots on the sda4 partition (which is set as /home).. Was I correct or am I screwing up again? Please forgive my ignorance and paranoia.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#2
Timeshift will save to whatever partition you told it to during set up. Open Timeshift settings to see where that is. Personally I set it to my /home partition which is /sdb3.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#3
(12-31-2019, 12:59 PM)cliffcoggin Wrote: Timeshift will save to whatever partition you told it to during set up. Open Timeshift settings to see where that is. Personally I set it to my /home partition which is /sdb3.

This is where I'm getting confused (I get confused so easily). I have Location in Timeshift set to my data partition (sda4) where /home is located and I've verified that is the partition where Timeshift is saving the snapshots. What I'm asking is Timeshift taking snapshots of the System (the Linux installation itself) located on sda2 or is it taking a snapshot of sda4?
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#4
Location selects the partition where your backup is saved.

It will not save to a NTFS partition.

Timeshift saves (by default) everything but your home directories (your personal home and the root home). You can change this, but you do not want to do that. Why? Because if you restore your system with a Timeshift backup that is a few days (or a few weeks) old, you do not want to replace your up-to-date data files with an older set of files. Back up your data separately.

I keep my Timeshift back ups on an external drive so if my computer hard drive fails I don't lose the back ups.

Richard
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#5
Wink 
(12-31-2019, 11:21 PM)Richard Wrote: Location selects the partition where your backup is saved.

It will not save to a NTFS partition.

Timeshift saves (by default) everything but your home directories (your personal home and the root home). You can change this, but you do not want to do that. Why? Because if you restore your system with a Timeshift backup that is a few days (or a few weeks) old, you do not want to replace your up-to-date data files with an older set of files. Back up your data separately.

I keep my Timeshift back ups on an external drive so if my computer hard drive fails I don't lose the back ups.

Richard

Thank you for the clarification; I will sleep better now. My data partition (/home) is ext4 so no worries there. Eventually, I will be copying the data partition to a pair of external backup drives but I haven't gotten that far yet. Heck, I haven't even put much data on the data partition. I just got back home yesterday after being out of town for ten days so I've a lot to deal with right now.

Your answer raised another question (will it ever end?  Wink ). My backups are going to be NTFS since I need for them to be compatible with Windows machines (even though my goal is to be completely divorced from Windows). I don't doubt that I can copy the Timeshift backup files to the backup drives but can Timeshift running on a Live Linux USB stick read the files from an NTFS backup drive or would I need to come up with an alternative?
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#6
Timeshift back ups must be saved to a partition formatted with a Linux file system, not to an NTFS formatted partition.

Your data back ups can be saved to any file system you want. You don't use Timeshift for backing up your home directory. You can just copy it with the file manager, or use a back up such as Joe's BU.

Richard
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#7
(01-01-2020, 01:58 AM)Richard Wrote: Timeshift back ups must be saved to a partition formatted with a Linux file system, not to an NTFS formatted partition.

Your data back ups can be saved to any file system you want. You don't use Timeshift for backing up your home directory. You can just copy it with the file manager, or use a back up such as Joe's BU.

Richard

Ok, let me try again and see if I can be a bit clearer (I haven't recovered from my last trip yet).

Currently, my Timeshift snapshots are saved to my data partition (sda4 /home) which is ext 4. This a partition of the one drive in my notebook computer that has Mint installed on it. That shouldn't be a problem unless that drive dies. I only expect Timeshift to backup the Linux system itself on sda2, not my data on sda4.

My data residing on sda4 (which is /home) will be backed up to two external backup drives using a folder/file syncing program called FreeFileSync (FFS). I used this on Win 7 so I'm already familiar with how it works. There is a Linux version which I have already installed from the repository. FFS copies files to the backup drive (it's a bit more involved but that's it in a nutshell) and probably can copy the Timeshift folder over to the the backup drives.

The two data backup drives need to be formatted to NTFS so they can be accessed by Windows machines. If me and my computers die in a fire, the executor of my will needs to be able to access my financial and other data from the backup drives I keep in my safe deposit box at my credit union. She and her family only use Windows machines so NTFS is a must for the backup drives.

The question I'm now asking is, since Timeshift will not save to NTFS, would it be able to read the copies of the snapshots that will be on the NTFS backup drives should the unthinkable happen and I lose the drive in the computer? If that happens, I would (hopefully) be using Timeshift running from a live Linus installation USB stick with it and one of the backup drives plugged into the computer to restore the Linux System back to the dead drive or its replacement. If not, I will have to search for a Plan B.

Btw, thanks for your responses!
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#8
(01-01-2020, 02:29 AM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: The question I'm now asking is, since Timeshift will not save to NTFS, would it be able to read the copies of the snapshots that will be on the NTFS backup drives should the unthinkable happen and I lose the drive in the computer? If that happens, I would (hopefully) be using Timeshift running from a live Linus installation USB stick with it and one of the backup drives plugged into the computer to restore the Linux System back to the dead drive or its replacement. If not, I will have to search for a Plan B.

As far as I know, Timeshift relies on symbolic links for its backups. UNIX file systems handle those different than NTFS, so moving your system backups on NTFS likely makes them unusable.
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"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#9
Furthermore I believe NTFS does not preserve permissions like Ext4, so that would further complicate matters.

Jeannie.

Why are you concerned about your executors getting access to Timeshift which normally only has system settings? I would have thought they need to access only your data i.e. /home.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#10
I have two external backup HDD's An older Maxtor  128 GB, and a Seagate 1TB.  I have the Maxtor drive formatted as ext4 and use it for Timeshift system backups only, which I have used numerous time after messing up my Mint OS.  On the Seagate I have three partitions, one for data formatted  to NTFS, The other for Fast File Sync formatted to NTFS.  The last one for Timeshift formatted in Ext4 (so I have two backups of Timeshift). The main Partition has 750 or so GB, The other two has around 100 GB storage each storage.  This works out for me really well.  I also use Mint Backup to and put that backup om the Seagate 750 GB partition.
Good luck.
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