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Linux on MacBook Air Question
#11
(12-06-2019, 03:48 AM)LinuxNoob Wrote: Leon.p, in your opinion, what are the main differences between CoreBoot and Libreboot? Are the differences that significant? Why do you think that Purism and System76 use CoreBoot, instead of Libreboot?

LibreBoot is CoreBoot, with all the proprietary binary blobs removed.

System76 and Purism use CoreBoot, because sadly they can not use LibreBoot, as modern CPUs require some binary blobs to boot. This is true for all common processors, whether intel, amd or even ARM chips.

This is why it is so important that there finaly is competition in the processor market again, as the two leading companies currently can get away with a lot of bullshit. There is some hope for the future: The Power9 architecture looks promising, which is supported by IBM, who uses it for servers, and other companies. There already is a motherboard for Power9 CPUs that uses only free software, however the price is quite high as of now (over $2000, if I remember correctly). But maybe in a few years there might be a Power9 laptop, that with a litle bit of luck, requires no proprietary firmware. The RISC-V architecture is also a good condidate for that.
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#12
(12-06-2019, 11:17 AM)leon.p Wrote: LibreBoot is CoreBoot, with all the proprietary binary blobs removed.

System76 and Purism use CoreBoot, because sadly they can not use LibreBoot, as modern CPUs require some binary blobs to boot. This is true for all common processors, whether intel, amd or even ARM chips.

If you're replacing Windows/macOS with Linux on a computer, can you put CoreBoot on there too or is the original BIOS somehow locked into the hardware?
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#13
(12-09-2019, 06:51 PM)LinuxNoob Wrote: If you're replacing Windows/macOS with Linux on a computer, can you put CoreBoot on there too or is the original BIOS somehow locked into the hardware?

For the vast amount of devices the answer will be no. I won't pretend to know enough about how BIOS and the early boot process works to tell you why, but my best guesses are that either the BIOS (or in modern times UEFI) is contained on a chip that is not flashable, or (which is more likely) that every motherboard manufacturer does everything different while not releasing documentation, meaning that the CoreBoot devs would have to reverse engineer every single mainboard they want it to run on.
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