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Anyone Using An SSD ?
#1
I've always wondered if SSDs were as good as people say...so several months ago I perchased my first SSD for two reasons...

1. My Mechanical HDDs were over 6 yrs old. [Image: t3603.gif]
2. The price has dropped enough to buy one.  [Image: m0126.gif]

I created an Image of my HDD with Macrium and put it on my new 500GB SSD and yes it's true...SSDs are fantastic and I can't believe how fast they are. [Image: t2012.gif]  My System is 64bit with a i5 CPU and 16GB of Ram.

My Boot time was slashed by two thirds...running Mint Cinnamon 19.1 on a HDD it took 36/38 seconds to the Login Screen and 16/18 seconds to the Desktop.

On the SSD...12/14 seconds to Login Screen and 4/5 seconds to Desktop [Image: m1211.gif] and everything you click opens in a flash...unbelievable.  I originally intended to keep the SSD as a test Drive but after seeing what they can do...it's now my main Drive...I wish these Drives were around years ago. [Image: t2001.gif]

We all know you should never defrag an SSD and I followed this guide... 

https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogspot.com/p/ssd.html  to keep my SSD running for many years...fingers crossed [Image: m0115.gif] I don't take as true what manufacturers say...because they can fail at any time too...so what are your experiences with SSDs...what do you think ?
Linux Forever...Windoze Never       [Image: t12701.gif]
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#2
oh yeah, SSDs are awesome

and, in addition to Speed:

Heat, they run much cooler, really important in Laptops
Power use: again, really important in Laptops

Last but not least.... Shock Resistant!
I am old, and clumsy. My laptop hitting the floor has happened, more than once, with the machine active.
ZERO damage! Now try that with spinning disk!
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#3
(10-12-2019, 01:26 AM)mexsudo Wrote: oh yeah, SSDs are awesome

and, in addition to Speed:

Heat, they run much cooler, really important in Laptops
Power use: again,  really important in Laptops

Last but not least.... Shock Resistant!
I am old, and clumsy. My laptop hitting the floor has happened, more than once, with the machine active.
ZERO damage! Now try that with spinning disk!

I got my SSD from a Computer store...I told the guy I also need an SSD Bracket...the guy said I didn't need one. [Image: t2609.gif]

To which I said...how it going to sit in the Drive Bay ?  SSD 2.5"...Drive Bay 3.5"...what do I use...sticky tape ?   [Image: t1940.gif]

I don't think this guy knew what I was talking about and these guys work on peoples Computers (not mine) anyway I got one somewhere else and all is well. [Image: t2010.gif]

I still have Mint Cinnamon 19.1 on my spare HDD...about a week ago I connected it to test something...It's so slow compared to the SSD. [Image: m1506.gif]
Linux Forever...Windoze Never       [Image: t12701.gif]
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#4
(10-12-2019, 06:26 AM)bob777 Wrote: I got my SSD from a Computer store...I told the guy I also need an SSD Bracket...the guy said I didn't need one.

To which I said...how it going to sit in the Drive Bay ?  SSD 2.5"...Drive Bay 3.5"...what do I use...sticky tape ?

A lot of people have them freely flying around in the case. As there are no moving parts in them, it usually is not a problem.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#5
I have not owned a spinning drive for about five years. My data is too precious to risk on a fragile disc spinning at several thousand rpm that can be damaged by the slightest knock. Both internal drives are SSD, as is the external backup drive, not to mention the numerous solid state memory sticks.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 18.3
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#6
(10-12-2019, 04:33 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 06:26 AM)bob777 Wrote: I got my SSD from a Computer store...I told the guy I also need an SSD Bracket...the guy said I didn't need one.

To which I said...how it going to sit in the Drive Bay ?  SSD 2.5"...Drive Bay 3.5"...what do I use...sticky tape ?

A lot of people have them freely flying around in the case. As there are no moving parts in them, it usually is not a problem.

My OCD is too strong to EVER allow that!  Big Grin

(10-12-2019, 04:34 PM)cliffcoggin Wrote: I have not owned a spinning drive for about five years. My data is too precious to risk on a fragile disc spinning at several thousand rpm that can be damaged by the slightest knock. Both internal drives are SSD, as is the external backup drive, not to mention the numerous solid state memory sticks.

It's been three or four years for me. My biggest reasons for the total switch was to save my back and shoulders when lugging my backup drives to and from my credit union safe deposit box and to reduce the amount of space needed to store the onsite and offsite backup drives (there is only so much room in my safe deposit box for the offsite backups).
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#7
(10-12-2019, 06:49 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: [...] reduce the amount of space needed to store the onsite and offsite backup drives [...]

Then you will love the new M.2 drives. They are even smaller than the typical SATA SSDs. So small that I think they will cause Laptops with multiple drive slots to become popular again. (Technically they already have, as a lot of laptops feature both an M.2 drive slot and a SATA slot. I use that to dual boot Parabola and Debian without having to mess around to much with partitioning.)


(10-12-2019, 06:49 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: My OCD is too strong to EVER allow that!

Completely understandable. In my main computer I would also never do that, but I have the weird tendency to not care to much about my secondary computers. Also some older cases don't have convenient mounting point for SSDs and for my media computer the SSD is connected via a USB to SATA adapter, so no mounting there either.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#8
(10-12-2019, 10:27 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 06:49 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: [...] reduce the amount of space needed to store the onsite and offsite backup drives [...]

Then you will love the new M.2 drives. They are even smaller than the typical SATA SSDs. So small that I think they will cause Laptops with multiple drive slots to become popular again. (Technically they already have, as a lot of laptops feature both an M.2 drive slot and a SATA slot. I use that to dual boot Parabola and Debian without having to mess around to much with partitioning.)

A major problem with M.2 is 2TB is the top limit for consumers (that has only been recently). Most are NVMe instead of SATA for which limited ports are available. I use 4TB SATA drives for data storage (a total of five) and backups (a total of 20), which are plenty fast for those applications. Also, 2.5" SATA drives are already essentially in an enclosure whereas M.2 are bare PCBs and enclosures for them are expensive (although heat sinks are less expensive and provide some degree of protection). M.2 SSDs are more expensive than SATA SSDs, even without enclosures.

There is far more hardware available for using 2.5" SATA drives externally and internally. The computer case I've been building will have the data drives in trays that can be removed in seconds without opening up the case. If replacing a drive that went belly up (an extremely rare occurrence; I've had only one SSD die out of the 44 I have and it was almost at the end of its five year warranty period and needed retiring anyway due to its small size), it will take only a handful of seconds to remove the tray, about a minute or less to remove four screws, replace the drive, replace the four screws, then plug it back into the computer, all without opening up the computer itself nor even shutting it down.Even updating backups will as simple as plugging up to four backup drives into dedicated hot swap bays at the same time and running the necessary software. The hardware to do the same with M.2 drives just doesn't exist yet. 

My three 15" notebooks take only one 2.5" SATA drive each. I have a 500GB SSD in the one that is retired and kept as a spare. The other two have a 2TB SSD in each one (I would have used 4TB but converting the OS to GPT wouldn't have been worth the hassle).

M.2 NVME SSDs are ideal for System files OS and programs. However, it will be quite a while before M.2 will replace 2.5" SATA. We will see 6TB and larger 2.5" SATA SSDs long before we see the same in M.2. Being a flatulent geriatric, there is a good chance my current 4TB SATA SSDs will outlive me.
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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#9
(10-12-2019, 04:33 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 06:26 AM)bob777 Wrote: I got my SSD from a Computer store...I told the guy I also need an SSD Bracket...the guy said I didn't need one.

To which I said...how it going to sit in the Drive Bay ?  SSD 2.5"...Drive Bay 3.5"...what do I use...sticky tape ?

A lot of people have them freely flying around in the case. As there are no moving parts in them, it usually is not a problem.

I like everything in my Tower safely secured...what happens if the SSD freely flying around falls on the Motherboard or any other Computer components while Tower is running [Image: t3610.gif] a bracket costs $5...damage to Computer slightly more. [Image: m1510.gif]
Linux Forever...Windoze Never       [Image: t12701.gif]
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#10
(10-12-2019, 10:27 PM)leon.p Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 06:49 PM)Lady Fitzgerald Wrote: My OCD is too strong to EVER allow that!

Completely understandable. In my main computer I would also never do that, but I have the weird tendency to not care to much about my secondary computers. Also some older cases don't have convenient mounting point for SSDs and for my media computer the SSD is connected via a USB to SATA adapter, so no mounting there either.

If I can't find a decent ready-made adapter for something I need to mount, I will make my own. And it won't look Michael Mouse. OCD, remember? Tongue
Jeannie

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!
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