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Ecstasy and Agony: Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” Update
#1
I did a manual upgrade from Ubuntu 18.04 to Ubuntu 19.10. If you have separate / and /home partitions, doing an in place upgrade is a matter of reloading the OS to the / partition while re-mounting the old /home at install. Everything went very well. There were no conflicts with GNOME 3.34 booting from the old GNOME 3.28 settings. Everything came up pretty much as I left it but with the new Yaru theme. Nice. We're still six days from the official release but I’d call it ready for prime time. It’s running brilliantly for me. I don;t think I’ve been this impressed with an Ubuntu interim release since Ubuntu 10.10 “Maverick Merekat.” Yes, it’s that good.

But…

The general reaction to the news that Canonical is forcing users to switch from the traditional Debian software packaging  to Snap packages starting with the Chromium browser has generally been taken negatively. I’ve had many comment that they felt it was a step too far and they would never use Ubuntu again. I myself am of two minds about it: I can clearly see the administrative advantages of maintaining one package for all the supported Ubuntu versions but then again there are still some nagging issues with snaps that can effect theming and usability of large graphic applications. Curiously, I’m not hearing a lot of chatter about this in the Community. 

Ubuntu developers will tell you that the interim release just before the next Long Term Support version is really just a beta for the LTS. That would imply that the next six months will be a time for Canonical to refine what we have in 19.10 and smooth out any problems that may arise between now and then. If so, the outlook for 20.04 looks good from a technical point of view but the political repercussions of the Deb-to-Snap transition may seriously mar what would otherwise be a very happy outlook for 20.04. We shall see…
-- Your Fearless Leader!

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#2
Well that sounds good that everything worked out and is working as it should.
To me the septerate "/" and "/home" partitions are key to doing upgrades or re-installs. See Joe, I Watch and Listen and Learn... HaHaHa...

Now I have been thing about this Snap issue. I can understand the backend of maintenance and keeping the up to date with all the versions of the .Deb packages. Now with that being said. Lets talk about "Bloat" Windows is full of it as everyone has stated and knows...
Here is the way I see SNAPS...
Let say you install this program and it has these dependencies; 1x  2xx 3xxx...
Now we install another program that needs these; 1x 3xxx   Ok...
Now we install another program that needs these; 2xx 3xxx   Ok...
Now we install another program that needs these; 1x 2xx 3xxx 4xxxx and on and on and on... Confused

Now look! We have the same dependencies over and over again and again! That is Bloat to me!!!
None of the other programs can use the others dependencies because they are sandboxed (if I understand the term correctly) and there for, you have many copies of the same dependencies over and over.
Where now we have programs using and sharing the same dependencies and not filling my hard drive with the files and dependencies over and over again and again.
I don't like the fact that I am forced to use Microsoft's thinking, make the user use it, what are they going to about it?!!!
That is why I left Windows Crap behind....  Angry
This is the way I see the Snap issue, right or wrong, there it is! Dodgy

I run a Ubuntu 18.04 file server and when I installed it it had 1 or 2 Snaps installed. Now I think it is upto 4 or 5. I use this to store 80% of my movies and music saving space on my local box's...

For now I will stay with Mint until they do the same thing (I don't see them doing this, but been wrong before) and then will leave them too! 
Every sense this started 8 month ago or whenever it was I started to plain my moves. I have MX Linux on one system, Manjaro on another and yet another one has Solus. I use them all dailly and this one is Mint 18.3 so and Jeremy says CY(Assets) ... I know that they all share Ubuntu's Repo's to some extent but are not totally depended on them...
Like I said, my thinking.... Later!
LLAP
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#3
(10-11-2019, 05:31 PM)bescott9944 Wrote: Now I have been thing about this Snap issue. I can understand the backend of maintenance and keeping the up to date with all the versions of the .Deb packages. Now with that being said. Lets talk about "Bloat" Windows is full of it as everyone has stated and knows...
Here is the way I see SNAPS...
Let say you install this program and it has these dependencies; 1x  2xx 3xxx...
Now we install another program that needs these; 1x 3xxx   Ok...
Now we install another program that needs these; 2xx 3xxx   Ok...
Now we install another program that needs these; 1x 2xx 3xxx 4xxxx and on and on and on... Confused

Now look! We have the same dependencies over and over again and again! That is Bloat to me!!!

Snaps are big... They solve problems and they present new ones. I will freely admit that Canonical has been somewhat heavy handed lately but I don't think it's anything near what MS does. This is only in a testing phase now so maybe they will elect not to go forward with it. I really don't know. Smile
-- Your Fearless Leader!

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#4
(10-11-2019, 05:31 PM)bescott9944 Wrote: [...]

For now I will stay with Mint until they do the same thing (I don't see them doing this, but been wrong before) and then will leave them too! 

[...]

well, more packages ubuntu will remove from the repos and more packages mint team have to put in it. That means more and more work to them. Will they or can they do this amount of work? Time will let us know that.
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#5
As a Mint user I have Flatpaks available instead of Snaps, but if their behaviour is similar beware of root being filled with tmp files. I recently was warned of low root space which turned out to be caused by 6 GB of tmp files that the Gradio flatpak was adding to daily. I don't know if the problem is unique to Gradio in particular or to Flatpaks in general, but it's worth watching for.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 18.3
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#6
Well, if Canonical doesn't feel like packaging binaries for all the living LTSs, why do they insist on the LTS model?
To my understanding, LTS models' aim is to keep the UX consistent, and only have security updates. So if you want to keep the UX consistent in a release, you still have to package the same software separately if there's any update about UX upstream.
So as I see it, it's exactly the user facing programs, that would be have to look differently on each LTSes, while no one would be able to tell if the underlying dependencies have been rolled up for a newer version. And the "universal" or "sandboxed" packaging does the opposite thing: you get the same UX on all releases, while your underlying dependencies can stay the same (as the package brings its own version).
So I don't see the problem with snaps as a political, but rather an important technical argument.
I am discovering Arch Linux as a total Linux newbie, and try to share my experience. I've managed to produce a working bootable USB and got my main PC up and running!
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