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Flatpak updates on startup...do, or do not?
#1
Hi Mint fiends,

I noticed that on startup, my system has an application that runs to update flatpaks.  I don't even remember allowing this to happen.  I noticed the activity one day when viewing htop.  Looking at my startup settings, I indeed found such an item turned on.

Is this safe and I should leave it on, or should I turn such auto updating off?

Thank you,
-Steve
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#2
Apparently Flatpak updating is automatic and unseen, unlike Mint updates. This came to light after I installed an application that I did not realise was a Flatpak, then when it updated a fault was introduced that buggered the application.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 18.3
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#3
Flatpak is just a software utility for the deployment and management of applications in a Linux environment.  Canonical's version of this is Snappy and Snaps.  With some distinctions and nuances, both systems are an attempt to distribute and manage apps across multiple Linux distributions without having to individually adapt the application for separate distros.

I'm not going to get in the middle of the debate of which system is superior, the pros and cons of each, or whether they should be installed and implemented by default in the latest distro versions.  If there is a flatpak app that you use and want to continue using, then you can decide whether or not you want to continue to receive updates or not, or whether or not you want to tweak the apps permissions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatpak

https://flatpak.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snappy_(package_manager)

https://snapcraft.io/docs
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#4
(09-07-2019, 11:53 PM)Steve Wrote: Hi Mint fiends,

I noticed that on startup, my system has an application that runs to update flatpaks.  I don't even remember allowing this to happen.  I noticed the activity one day when viewing htop.  Looking at my startup settings, I indeed found such an item turned on.

Is this safe and I should leave it on, or should I turn such auto updating off?

Thank you,
-Steve

If you are using an application that uses the flatpak system then leave the updating service on.  You want the application or in the future applications updating.

However for those that are not using flatpaks turning it off doesn't hurt.  The only issue here is if one starts using flatpaks and the updater is disabled it should be renabled.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#5
(09-08-2019, 12:27 PM)Eurus Wrote: Flatpak is just a software utility for the deployment and management of applications in a Linux environment.  Canonical's version of this is Snappy and Snaps.  With some distinctions and nuances, both systems are an attempt to distribute and manage apps across multiple Linux distributions without having to individually adapt the application for separate distros.

I'm not going to get in the middle of the debate of which system is superior, the pros and cons of each, or whether they should be installed and implemented by default in the latest distro versions.  If there is a flatpak app that you use and want to continue using, then you can decide whether or not you want to continue to receive updates or not, or whether or not you want to tweak the apps permissions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatpak

https://flatpak.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snappy_(package_manager)

https://snapcraft.io/docs

Also, let's not forget about the opinions by which neither flatpaks, nor snaps, not even appimages are an optimal / desirable way to distribute software. The following link for me was brought to my attention when I asked about this topic on the Arch forums:

http://kmkeen.com/maintainers-matter/

With all these different technicalities, now we made it difficult for you to decide Big Grin
I am working on an Arch installation in a VM that will be moved to an USB stick.
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#6
(09-08-2019, 11:17 AM)cliffcoggin Wrote: Apparently Flatpak updating is automatic and unseen, unlike Mint updates. This came to light after I installed an application that I did not realise was a Flatpak, then when it updated a fault was introduced that buggered the application.

Hmmmmm...this may be what happened to me too.  I don't know of any bugs so far.  Interesting.

Did you turn off the auto updating?

-Steve

(09-08-2019, 12:27 PM)Eurus Wrote: Flatpak is just a software utility for the deployment and management of applications in a Linux environment.  Canonical's version of this is Snappy and Snaps.  With some distinctions and nuances, both systems are an attempt to distribute and manage apps across multiple Linux distributions without having to individually adapt the application for separate distros.

I'm not going to get in the middle of the debate of which system is superior, the pros and cons of each, or whether they should be installed and implemented by default in the latest distro versions.  If there is a flatpak app that you use and want to continue using, then you can decide whether or not you want to continue to receive updates or not, or whether or not you want to tweak the apps permissions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatpak

https://flatpak.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snappy_(package_manager)

https://snapcraft.io/docs

Thank you for this info and the links!  I'll have to do some digging now...hahah

-Steve

(09-08-2019, 01:18 PM)cleverwise Wrote:
(09-07-2019, 11:53 PM)Steve Wrote: Hi Mint fiends,

I noticed that on startup, my system has an application that runs to update flatpaks.  I don't even remember allowing this to happen.  I noticed the activity one day when viewing htop.  Looking at my startup settings, I indeed found such an item turned on.

Is this safe and I should leave it on, or should I turn such auto updating off?

Thank you,
-Steve

If you are using an application that uses the flatpak system then leave the updating service on.  You want the application or in the future applications updating.

However for those that are not using flatpaks turning it off doesn't hurt.  The only issue here is if one starts using flatpaks and the updater is disabled it should be renabled.

Well, if it's safe to do so, then lets keep the updates automatic.  Guess I was worried for nada.

Thank you for helping me out,
-Steve

(09-09-2019, 01:17 AM)TarsolyGer Wrote:
(09-08-2019, 12:27 PM)Eurus Wrote: Flatpak is just a software utility for the deployment and management of applications in a Linux environment.  Canonical's version of this is Snappy and Snaps.  With some distinctions and nuances, both systems are an attempt to distribute and manage apps across multiple Linux distributions without having to individually adapt the application for separate distros.

I'm not going to get in the middle of the debate of which system is superior, the pros and cons of each, or whether they should be installed and implemented by default in the latest distro versions.  If there is a flatpak app that you use and want to continue using, then you can decide whether or not you want to continue to receive updates or not, or whether or not you want to tweak the apps permissions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatpak

https://flatpak.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snappy_(package_manager)

https://snapcraft.io/docs

Also, let's not forget about the opinions by which neither flatpaks, nor snaps, not even appimages are an optimal / desirable way to distribute software. The following link for me was brought to my attention when I asked about this topic on the Arch forums:

http://kmkeen.com/maintainers-matter/

With all these different technicalities, now we made it difficult for you to decide Big Grin

Well...that was a interesting read.  Hmmmmm...
-Steve
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#7
(09-09-2019, 09:36 AM)Steve Wrote:
(09-08-2019, 11:17 AM)cliffcoggin Wrote: Apparently Flatpak updating is automatic and unseen, unlike Mint updates. This came to light after I installed an application that I did not realise was a Flatpak, then when it updated a fault was introduced that buggered the application.

Hmmmmm...this may be what happened to me too.  I don't know of any bugs so far.  Interesting.

Did you turn off the auto updating?

-Steve
No. I dumped the application (which was one of the Keepass derivatives,) and reverted to a repository version.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 18.3
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