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I love Linux
#1
I started to use Ubuntu around 2 years ago just for curiosity. I heard about it but never checked what really it was.
I tried to install it on my old little HP laptop.
And everything went well without glitches. I hear a lot on web people struggling with issues on installations and never understand why. I installed until now to my other computers at home Linux (Ubuntu and Mint) and never had real problems. I just install with standard options without messing around with special/advanced options. Just click "continue"...OK...OK...OK...done. Everything works fine.
I found in Linux more than a new (for me at least) kind of operating system and I am not a computer scientist. If realized, entered, encountered the world FOSS which was new for me.
I find this notion of FOSS beautiful. For me it is the first reason why I use Linux. I think it is some kind of altruism that is rare in our world. To open and share your hard work with others...? Normally nobody wants to give/share freely other people things...
And in fact I am even a little afraid that Linux expands (maybe strange) because if so, more egoistic (bad intentions) forces will be blended (such as money interests, corporations etc). I don't care personally that the community is not huge...
I love the fact that sometimes I need to struggle with technical things, searching reasons, clicking commands (that I don't understand), finding really caring people who help you in forums.
Every time I see answers with crazy commands, I tell (and laugh) myself "How the hell this guy knows these commands!!". I just remember a few simple commands: sudo, ls, cd, ...Many times I don't even understand the questions (of others). For example: "how-to-rebuild-the-dockerfile-for-kubernetes-dashboard" (from Ask Ubuntu). What the hell is "dockerfile", what is "kubernetes", what is "dashboard" and what is "to rebuild"?! I really love this community...They know every damn question!
In Windows, for every question you get the same answer: install updates, reboot, etc. nothing works and no answers.
That said, I have critics about things. As a standard (previously Windows) user I found very difficult to understand installations and updates. I struggled a lot with these.
Say today, I wanted to add to some picture an arrow. In Windows Paint I can do it quickly. It is the most simple and useful software that I use. Here I opened Gimp and tried to find where was the draw an arrow button? I couldn't find it. There are billions of buttons and options but I couldn't see this simple option.
Anyway...I really love Linux...
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#2
Quote:I find this notion of FOSS beautiful. For me it is the first reason why I use Linux. I think it is some kind of altruism that is rare in our world. To open and share your hard work with others...? Normally nobody wants to give/share freely other people things...

I agree.  I have been on both ends as a user and a contributor.  I enjoy both as no one knows it all nor can any do it all.

Quote:And in fact I am even a little afraid that Linux expands (maybe strange) because if so, more egoistic (bad intentions) forces will be blended (such as money interests, corporations etc). I don't care personally that the community is not huge...

I wouldn't put any worry into this IMO.  While money does bring changes remember a huge part of FOSS (including Linux) is open source.  So more often than not money helps because it allows for more development.  Google and Facebook have contributed a lot to Linux due to finding bugs and solutions and posting code that the general community enjoys.  IBM puts money into Linux.  The list is quite long on this one.

Quote:What the hell is "dockerfile", what is "kubernetes", what is "dashboard" and what is "to rebuild"?! I really love this community...They know every damn question!

Docker is a self contained application and OS.  It allows developers to create an application based on a specific environment say Ubuntu 16.04 with a specific version of Curl, Python, OpenSSL, etc.  Then package it all up and pass it out to others.  This way there is no messing around with incorrect versions of Curl or Python or whatever.  So basically Docker is like a mini Virtual Machine.

I personally don't care for it.  It is also a security nightmare as often you get outdated versions of say openssl that have vulnerabilities.  However it does make getting an application up and running quick since the included OS and environment is preconfigured.  This is basically the server version of AppImage.

Kubernetes is a way to deploy virtual machines and docker images.

Rebuild in this case is just referring to creating the Docker file so that it will run in the Kubernetes environment.  By default most will fail as one has to prepare the Docker image in a specific way.

Quote:That said, I have critics about things. As a standard (previously Windows) user I found very difficult to understand installations and updates. I struggled a lot with these.

One of the most confusing items for new users to Linux is how to install new software.  So I am not surprised.  As for updates most should be pulled down via the auto updating system built into Linux.

Quote:Say today, I wanted to add to some picture an arrow. In Windows Paint I can do it quickly.

Try Pinta.  That is like MS Paint for Linux.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#3
I try to convert as many people as I can to Linux Mint, but the old Windows "experts" dismiss it as not being powerful enough. I feel that 90% of Windows users don't need Windows. Linux would fix their needs better than Windows. But these "experts" say Windows is the only way to go. They spent a lot of time and a lot of money on Windows, so to them, they see no reason to learn, never mind support, Linux.
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#4
(08-30-2019, 04:07 PM)Joel920 Wrote: I try to convert as many people as I can to Linux Mint, but the old Windows "experts" dismiss it as not being powerful enough. I feel that 90% of Windows users don't need Windows. Linux would fix their needs better than Windows. But these "experts" say Windows is the only way to go. They spent a lot of time and a lot of money on Windows, so to them, they see no reason to learn, never mind support, Linux.

I am sure companies could also save a lot of money if their offices run Linux machines and FOSS office tools. Even complex CRM tools are available for Linux systems.
My top 10 reasons to still use Arch after 2 months on my main PC at home.
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#5
(08-30-2019, 04:07 PM)Joel920 Wrote: I try to convert as many people as I can to Linux Mint, but the old Windows "experts" dismiss it as not being powerful enough. I feel that 90% of Windows users don't need Windows. Linux would fix their needs better than Windows. But these "experts" say Windows is the only way to go. They spent a lot of time and a lot of money on Windows, so to them, they see no reason to learn, never mind support, Linux.

That is often how it goes.  You have a lot of tech people invested in the Windows ecosystem that do not want to change and resist it quite hard.  However Linux continues to grow despite any real massive coordinated effort.  Smile

One way to better sell Linux is the growing public concern over privacy and ransomware.  You should never say Linux is 100% foolproof but it is a lot better protected.  Plus some spying on Linux can still happen if you use Facebook, Google services, etc as those are OS agnostic.  However Linux itself is not prone to the issues Windows 10 has when it comes to data spying.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#6
(08-30-2019, 04:07 PM)Joel920 Wrote: I try to convert as many people as I can to Linux Mint, but the old Windows "experts" dismiss it as not being powerful enough. I feel that 90% of Windows users don't need Windows. Linux would fix their needs better than Windows. But these "experts" say Windows is the only way to go. They spent a lot of time and a lot of money on Windows, so to them, they see no reason to learn, never mind support, Linux.

In my opinion it is futile to try to convert a committed Windows user, he has a vested interest in keeping to what he knows and has spent money on. However anybody who is wavering, or has doubts about the security of Windows, is ripe for conversion. Like all change, an incentive is needed before one becomes receptive to new ideas.
Cliff Coggin
Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
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#7
(08-31-2019, 04:27 PM)cliffcoggin Wrote: However anybody who is wavering, or has doubts about the security of Windows, is ripe for conversion. Like all change, an incentive is needed before one becomes receptive to new ideas.

People immediately become very open to the idea of using something other than windows when they fail to achieve what they want to do on it.

You can not really get any work done if your operating system is stuck in a boot-loop, if it uses more than half of your disk and RAM, if it constantly annoys you with pop-ups and notifications, if it needs multiple minutes to boot, if it decides to reset your customisations, if it hides aeverything behind unnecessary abstractions (seriously, I feel bad for anyone who has to program anything on windows) or if you can not easiely install the applications you need (setting up LaTeX on windows is truely annoying).

Just wait for such a situation and keep a USB drive with a live-ISO around.
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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#8
On both Linux and Windows I've been a long-time user of Open Source software and other freeware and I've always cherished the fact that there are talented people who devote their time and skills to producing programs/applications in order for people to use their computers effectively without having to take out a second or third mortgage or sell their kids.

Over the years, as both a paid and casual computer technician, I've recommended Open Source software solutions to hundreds of people and lauded the developers of same as saviours of humankind.

While Microsoft takes a fortune for its OS and gives you nothing but a basic paint tool, a simple featureless text editor and a crappy web browser and demands that you pay another fortune if you want your machine to do something more than sit on your desk and look vaguely "techy", there are people out there whose "blood is worth bottling" - as the expression goes - who believe that, as a computer owner, there are things you should be able to do with your computer by default without having to outlay bags of cash on top of what you've already paid when you bought the damned thing.

Your computer came with Windows pre-installed?  OK, but it still doesn't do anything!  Here's an office suite you can download for nothing, here's a better web browser, here's a photo editing suite, here's an MP3 player, here's a video player that's not limited to a couple of proprietary Microsoft video formats and will play pretty much anything out there...

Your machine has no OS?  Well, have we got news for you! Here's an entire OS developed by a robust community and there's oodles of software developed for it.  You can even choose which bundle you want that comes with a whole raft of stuff to get you up and running - office suite, email, web browser, photo editor, programming languages, video and music players and so on...

And I agree with the Open Source developers.  You should be able to do something productive with that machine you've spent hundreds/thousands on without having to outlay another cent.  You don't go out and spend a few thousand on a car and then have to pay extra for it to be able to go around corners or accelerate to highway speeds.

Seriously, I have met people who weren't particularly tech savvy who bought one of these newfangled computer things and were dismayed to discover that it did absolutely nothing and they were now expected to buy things to make it work

Here's your car.  Doesn't it look pretty?  Now, if you want to sit in it, you'll have to buy seats.  If you want to actually go anywhere, you'll need to buy wheels... and a steering wheel is essential if you want to be able to steer it...


A new computer with Windows installed is a big dumb box that effectively does nothing until you either pay Microsoft (and/or other vendors cashing in on the lack of functionality in Windows) more money or you download Open Source software developed by the real heroes out there.

More new machines should come bundled with a Linux distro.  At the very least, there should be more machines with no OS at all being sold at the raw hardware price.
Asus X58L
Debian 8 with MATE
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