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Convincing Friends/Relatives To Use GNU/Linux
#1
Saluton!
I've been using (GNU/)Linux for a long-ish time, and have been told all sorts of ridiculous misconceptions about Linux as reasons for why one can't possibly use it. These `reasons' have made creating new users of Linux difficult (for me).

I was wondering if people might share stories and advice on convincing others into Linux?

I also wouldn't mind hearing what misconceptions people have heard regarding Linux; they tend to be rather funny!
Lernu, uzu, amu Linukson!
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#2
I have several articles that refer to the ease and use of GNU/Linux, especially there is a MX Linux distribution that is very stable, beautiful and easy to use by both beginners and advanced users, also has a very active forum where they solve quickly the doubts that you have and that I have not seen in any other forum, always take a long time to answer and sometimes the solutions are not the best.
Este es uno de los articulos: https://lapaginadegerman.site123.me/gnu-...ncipiantes

As I see that this forum is very targeted to Mint users, I have an article that I uploaded when I used Mint (now I use and I do not change MX Linux) that can help you for people who want to try a GNU / Linux distribution that takes time and It is very good to start.
You can read it here: https://lapaginadegerman.site123.me/gnu-...linux-mint
  Cool  No todos ignoramos las mismas cosas.  Huh
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#3
Joe and I recorded the following if you haven't listened this may help:

Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Episode 4 | Marketing Linux

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JkOBBuoyNo

In general getting people to switch from Windows to Linux in one jump isn't going to happen.  The best approach is start getting them interested in applications that work on Linux and Windows (or Mac).

For example if someone uses MS Office show them LibreOffice.  If someone uses Outlook show them Thunderbird.  If someone uses IE or Edge show them Chrome, Vivaldi, Firefox, etc.  If someone likes Photoshop show them GIMP.  You get the picture.

The point is to slowly, at their pace, get them off applications that are locked to Windows (or Mac).  Then you may start to convert to them Linux itself.  Of course if you have a laptop or a way to show them your setup that helps too.

If you are only working on leave Windows (and all software they currently know) you'll find major roadblocks.  People in general don't like change and don't want to learn a bunch of new things.  So baby steps.  It is a process of little by little; bit by bit.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#4
Having helped get two of my friend try linux and make the switch and switching myself. I found the first thing I came across with them and myself was making sure the programs used for day to day use were available, reliable, and easy to transition to.

The second thing is the terminal. I know I am trying to integrate the terminal into my day to day use as I learn about the OS. Having used a GUI almost all my life its still the first place I go and feel comfortable. I know my friends don't use the terminal as much as I do, but I found that after getting them to play Terminus by MIT they seemed less weary of the terminal. Link here: http://web.mit.edu/mprat/Public/web/Term.../main.html

I will say from my experience with linux were every few years I would install and check it out I never found it was meeting my needs for day to day use. I know some might not like this, but software and ease of use matter. Sometime people need a certain piece of software. Also some don't want to learn how to use new software or doing things in a different ways. I will say anything to make the transition easier is great, but linux might not be for them yet.
Intel® Core™2 Duo CPU     T7700  @ 2.40GHz  4GB RAM
Linux Mint 19 (Tera) Xfce
AMD Athotholon™ 64           TF-20 @ 1.6GHZ 4GB RAM
Bodhi Linux 5

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#5
I don't really try to convince others to use Linux. Instead, I wait for them to complain about their systems, and if it's getting on the way of their work, I show them what's available on the FOSS side of the computing world. They're usually happy about the result.

I'd note that, once you're bringing someone into the Linux world, it's important to help them migrate their workflow. It's not enough to say "these applications replace those applications". Most tools aren't meant as replacements, instead they're designed to do certain things. that might or might not overlap with their "counterparts". If you're doing an install for someone else, make sure they can install the software they need or at the very least, help them rebuild their workflow with other tools. If they're not able to work, they will get frustrated and go back to Windows or MacOS.

I've often found that people who have misconceptions about Linux are the ones more interested on having an opinion on a topic instead of knowing about it. I don't bother with them. It's not a rule, just an observation I've made.
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#6
As a former Windows user I hear all kinds of excuses and lack of interest in Linux because they base it on the way Linux used to be like when I tried Linux for the first time back in 2000 because at the time I felt like smashing the computer I had that came with the most unstable garbage ever created which was Windows 98se. I tried Corel then Mandrake then Redhat which none of them the sound would work and couldn't connect to the Internet. There was no support at all for Linux back then, just lame excuses blaming everything else than the real problem which was Linux. They also think that you need to use the C.L.I. which scares them away from Linux, thanks to Linux elitists forcing it down people's throats. Also I find people have tried Linux not too long ago because they tried a bad Linux distro for a new user or a bad distro period like Manjaro which is the worst! Later on Windows got much better after Windows 98se to the point I didn't need anything else. I gave Linux another try after seeing that spyware/malware come out called Windows 10 that I disagree with the E.L.U.A. Linux worked this time. Now I hear all the complaints of people using Windows and the disgusting complacency of giving there privacy and their computer to Microsoft. I show them my computer which I only use MX Linux, my nephew is the only one who tried using my laptop on his own which he had no trouble figuring out how to use it because Xfce with the Whisker menu is similar to using Windows 7. That didn't convert him because his stupid games are more important to him than anything else. Others have watched me used it and were surprised that I didn't use the convoluted antiquated counter intuitive extremely non user friendly command line interface that's written in Gibberish. They still won't switch to Linux. The way I see it, "you can lead people to Linux but you can't make them use it."
Switched from Windows to Linux on 9/2015. I use MX-17.1 Linux.
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#7
I do not spend too much time in trying to convince others to use Linux.  My immediate family are converts.   If anyone asks me why Linux? The answers are (1) Linux does everything I need and (2) the software costs are considerably less than any available for the alternative computer systems, in fact nearly all Linux software is free.
Gordon
NZ.

Locally built 64bit desktop,  Drives 120 GB SSD,  280 GB HD (the original), 1 TB HD,
External 1TB HD backup.Also, modified Dell 9010 as system backup.
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#8
(08-22-2018, 01:08 PM)cleverwise Wrote: Joe and I recorded the following if you haven't listened this may help:

Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Episode 4 | Marketing Linux

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JkOBBuoyNo

In general getting people to switch from Windows to Linux in one jump isn't going to happen.  The best approach is start getting them interested in applications that work on Linux and Windows (or Mac).

For example if someone uses MS Office show them LibreOffice.  If someone uses Outlook show them Thunderbird.  If someone uses IE or Edge show them Chrome, Vivaldi, Firefox, etc.  If someone likes Photoshop show them GIMP.  You get the picture.

The point is to slowly, at their pace, get them off applications that are locked to Windows (or Mac).  Then you may start to convert to them Linux itself.  Of course if you have a laptop or a way to show them your setup that helps too.

If you are only working on leave Windows (and all software they currently know) you'll find major roadblocks.  People in general don't like change and don't want to learn a bunch of new things.  So baby steps.  It is a process of little by little; bit by bit.

I agree that overall , people hate change, but i have helped a number of my friends change over to linux by the following method that worked for me.. having gotten finally fed up with windows. Though my use of Linux os systems is mainly for recreational use i have switched my friends over by getting there old laptops set up with linux lite.. this gives them the chance to explore and not be afraid to push it around , unloike windows.. then when they have questions or need help i can answer them or point them to a place to get the answers .. Joe Collins vids as well as many others on you tube and here as well as the ezeelinux fb page.. at 57.. i made the jump all in one fell swoop and yes there was a learning curve.. but it wasnt painful.. i knew i was going to make mistakes and most likely break something.. but its been great and im still learning everyday.. always hated computers but this is more fun than i thought possible.. and the terminal .. man i smile everytime i get something right..happens more often now than at the beginning.. cheers
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#9
If someone has an extra computer that is a great way to introduce them to Linux.  It is similar to what I said above.

You are giving them time to explore Linux and alternative apps while they still have their familiar Windows machine. That is the real key for most people.  You aren't stopping their Windows fix cold turkey.  They get to dip their toe in to the Linux world, then their feet, then legs, and eventually they are fairly committed.

So I agree having another system is an excellent way and even if not many older computers may be bought on the cheap for testing.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#10
From my experience of converting people it was quite easy, for one thing they (the customer, relative, friend etc) were annoyed with the Malware that kept hitting them, also speed became an issue for a while. So i referred them to ZorinOS as it was easy for a Win user to customize closely to resemble what they were used to.
Then it was just a case of showing them how to update the system via the GUI and then eventually via CLI but the latter was really a small element as they tended to forget the commands ( which let's face it, is easily done ).
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