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[Solved] Computer in "SafeMode"...
#1
Hi guys, I hope you are all well ...

This newbie would appreciate some urgent help with a problem that I hope will be easily remedied by the more experienced Linux user. I've just returned from an 8 day holiday, turned on my computer, and installed all the new available updates ... now my computer is permanently booting/running in "Safe Mode". 

Since updating, I'm getting a message to "Update Drivers", but when I attempt to do so, I get an additional message instructing me "Drivers cannot be installed - Please connect to the internet or insert the Linux Mint installation DVD (or USB stick)". I upgraded from 19.1 to 19.2 via the Update Manager, so do not have an installation disk .... to complicate things even more, I am unable to connect to the internet either with the wireless function, or via an ethernet cable.

If it's any help, I'm also getting another window message stating "Check your video drivers - Your system is currently running without video hardware acceleration. You may experience poor performance and very high CPU usage".

Any assistance would be very gratefully received ....
Cheers!!  Smile Smile
Live as if you were die tomorrow .... Learn as if you were to live forever.

Mahatma Gandhi .....
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#2
(08-18-2019, 12:38 PM)aetesaki Wrote: Picture, please. It seems like you are booting to a broken M$ Windows installation.

Hi ... thanks for the response. This is the screen image you requested ...


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.png   Screenshot 1.png (Size: 343.33 KB / Downloads: 24)
Live as if you were die tomorrow .... Learn as if you were to live forever.

Mahatma Gandhi .....
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#3
I am not sure if you are using UEFI or BiOS.

1) Reboot the computer and before it loads the Mint home screen press and hold SHIFT (for BIOS) or ESC (for UEFI).

2) A boot menu should appear.  You should be able to select the previous kernel in regular mode by using the arrows keys.

3) Once highlighted hit enter to load that older kernel.

Does the system function normally?
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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#4
You are spot on "cleverwise" my friend ... and thanks for your brilliant response.

Just minutes before your suggestion, I discovered the "Warning!" notes in the Kernels section of the Update Manager, which described my problem perfectly.. I went through the list of identical updates on my dual boot machine, and that too experienced problems when I installed "Linux kernel 4.15.0-58.64" update. I've followed the instructions you mentioned, and everything is now tickety-boo with both machines.

I also added that kernel to the new "Blacklist" function in Mint 19.2

Thanks again "cleverwise", and to everyone who responded ... I'll be more careful in future with kernel updates (a very big lesson learned today!!!).
Live as if you were die tomorrow .... Learn as if you were to live forever.

Mahatma Gandhi .....
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#5
Good deal.  Most of the time kernels work but sometimes new kernels break something or somethings.  However in Linux rolling back isn't that big of a deal.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
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