Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Do I need antivirus if I use Wine?
#1
I have a Linux computer where all the apps are native Linux apps except for 7-Zip which is a windows app within Wine and games that run within Wine. All the games are games I own and are trusted window applications. I do not use Java, I do not use Adobe Flash. Could I still get infected by something with this setup? Do I need to worry about antivirus?
Reply
#2
If you don't use the machine to access the Internet then no otherwise there is a risk.

Once WINE is installed it can translate Windows instructions into Linux commands.  Now this doesn't mean all malware can successfully execute on Linux but it does open the door to some getting "translated" to run on Linux.  Then it comes down to what the malware is doing.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
Reply
#3
(08-17-2019, 09:10 PM)cleverwise Wrote: If you don't use the machine to access the Internet then no otherwise there is a risk.

Once WINE is installed it can translate Windows instructions into Linux commands.  Now this doesn't mean all malware can successfully execute on Linux but it does open the door to some getting "translated" to run on Linux.  Then it comes down to what the malware is doing.

If I was surfing the web in a native linux browser could I get a Windows virus that will install itself into a wine prefix or be able to run within a wine prefix?
Reply
#4
(08-18-2019, 04:05 AM)trymeout Wrote: If I was surfing the web in a native linux browser could I get a Windows virus that will install itself into a wine prefix or be able to run within a wine prefix?

I think for that, the author of the malware should be specifically targeting your PC and know what's going on there, but I might be wrong.
I think most Windows malware are designed to install themselves on Windows, and not into a Wine prefix may or may not being present on the computer.
I am working on an Arch installation in a VM that will be moved to an USB stick.
Reply
#5
The problem is that wine will force itself into the MIME database, meaning that your computer will now execute all binaries designed to run on windows automatically with wine. I have seen videos demonstrating that WannaCry works on Linux with Wine because of this.

If you turn that off, so that you have to explicitly start something wine, you should be safe.
(I have never used Wine, so I can not tell you where that option is.)
My website - My git repos

"Things are only impossible until they’re not." - Captain Jean-Luc Picard
Reply
#6
There are ways to reduce your risk with WINE installed however to think you can totally be safe would be foolish.

As mentioned there have been demonstrations and some real world infections with WINE.  It is not as common as with Windows itself, however you are using a program that understands and translates Windows instructions into Linux instructions so you can never be as safe with WINE installed as you are without it installed.

PlayOnLinux is the safer way to use WINE.  This is because each program is fairly isolated and gets its own copy of WINE.  This does eat up more disk/storage space but it is far better isolation than WINE itself.  Plus it is easier to setup and allows for each Windows program to have its own unique copy of WINE which is nice since not all programs work with the same settings.

I would strongly suggest associating .exe's with a program like your text editor.  Of course this will fail but that is the point.  What you don't want is exe's double clicked just auto launching with WINE.   Still, as mentioned, you are increasing your risk with any version of WINE.  You just have to decide which is more important: the Windows program or the risk.

There is no right productivity answer and I totally understand you may really need or just really want a program.  That is fine.  I am just explaining the risks and not whether to use WINE or not.

The best option but more expensive is to have two systems.  Your main Linux system without WINE and a gaming rig with WINE or even Windows.  Then only use the gaming rig with games even if they have an online component.  Of course I understand this requires more money, but I wanted to put it out there as an option.

It is cool WINE exists but at the end of the day there are security and privacy concerns with the program.  There is just no way around it.  Everyone has to make the call what works for them.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
Reply
#7
(08-18-2019, 01:23 PM)cleverwise Wrote: There are ways to reduce your risk with WINE installed however to think you can totally be safe would be foolish.

As mentioned there have been demonstrations and some real world infections with WINE.  It is not as common as with Windows itself, however you are using a program that understands and translates Windows instructions into Linux instructions so you can never be as safe with WINE installed as you are without it installed.

PlayOnLinux is the safer way to use WINE.  This is because each program is fairly isolated and gets its own copy of WINE.  This does eat up more disk/storage space but it is far better isolation than WINE itself.  Plus it is easier to setup and allows for each Windows program to have its own unique copy of WINE which is nice since not all programs work with the same settings.

I would strongly suggest associating .exe's with a program like your text editor.  Of course this will fail but that is the point.  What you don't want is exe's double clicked just auto launching with WINE.   Still, as mentioned, you are increasing your risk with any version of WINE.  You just have to decide which is more important: the Windows program or the risk.

There is no right productivity answer and I totally understand you may really need or just really want a program.  That is fine.  I am just explaining the risks and not whether to use WINE or not.

The best option but more expensive is to have two systems.  Your main Linux system without WINE and a gaming rig with WINE or even Windows.  Then only use the gaming rig with games even if they have an online component.  Of course I understand this requires more money, but I wanted to put it out there as an option.

It is cool WINE exists but at the end of the day there are security and privacy concerns with the program.  There is just no way around it.  Everyone has to make the call what works for them.

I do use POL because you can have wine prefixes for each Windows program and I do not like using wine GUIs that uses one wine prefix for all of your windows applications. What do you mean by "associating .exe's with a program like your text editor"?
Reply
#8
That is good that you use POL.

When you try and open an exe in the file manager how does your computer respond?
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
Reply
#9
When I click on a EXE file in my Nemo file manager it does run the EXE. The EXE file I tested was stored in my /home/me/Downloads/ folder. How do I have it so it will not run the EXE at all within Nemo?
Reply
#10
(08-19-2019, 05:30 PM)trymeout Wrote: When I click on a EXE file in my Nemo file manager it does run the EXE. The EXE file I tested was stored in my /home/me/Downloads/ folder. How do I have it so it will not run the EXE at all within Nemo?

1) In your file manager right click over an exe to bring up menu.  Then go to option that says "Open with another application..." or something similar.  I use Caja.

2) Left click once to highlight say your preferred text editor.

3) Check the box at bottom that says something like "Always use x to open".

This should associate exe's with that specific program by default.
Jeremy (Mr. Server)

* Desktop: Ubuntu MATE
* Windows are for your walls, Apple is for your health, Linux is for your computer
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)